Treatments

Contact us

Swedish Maxillofacial Surgery

See all


Treatment for Abnormal Jaw Growth

  • Orthognathic surgery: Surgical procedures to create straight (ortho) jaws (gnathic). The type of orthognathic surgery will depend on your particular jaw anatomy. You will often need orthodontic braces before and after orthognathic surgery.
  • Osteotomy: Surgery to shorten, lengthen or realign a bone. Depending on your particular situation, your surgeon may recommend:
    • Lefort 1 osteotomy (to correct the upper jaw and palate)
    • Bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (to correct the lower jaw)
    • Inverted L osteotomy (to correct the lower jaw)
    • Vertical ramus osteotomy (to correct the lower jaw)
  • Genioplasty: Surgery to reposition the chin.
  • Distraction osteogenesis: Surgery to move two segments of bone apart slowly, so new bone can grow in the resulting gap.


Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS)

  • Typically patients with these conditions are prescribed continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machines or dental devices. Although both of these treatments are effective, not all patients do well with them. For these patients, surgery may be an alternative. Other patients who may benefit from surgery include those younger than 30 years of age who have moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea and had teeth removed for orthodontic braces as a teen.
  • We are part of a multidisciplinary team of sleep medicine specialists at Swedish. Our surgeons work with otolarngologists (ear, nose and throat specialists) and bariatric surgeons to help you select the most appropriate surgical solution to your narrow airway. This evaluation considers your general health, severity of sleep apnea and your particular anatomy.
  • Maxillomandibular advancement (MMA): This is the most successful surgical procedure for OSA after tracheotomy. MMA brings the jaws forward to open the airway. Typically, good candidates for this surgery are healthy individuals with severe OSA who are younger than 50 years of age, and cannot tolerate CPAP or have had unsuccessful prior surgeries.
  • Genioglossus advancement: Surgery on the chin to bring the largest muscle in the tongue forward, thus opening the airway
  • Tongue reduction: Surgery to reduce the volume of the tongue
  • Septoplasty: Surgery to correct the alignment of bone and cartilage located between the nostrils


Treatment for Trigeminal Nerve Injury

  • Decompression: Removing tissue that may be pressing on the nerve.
  • Neuroma excision: Removing the injured or scarred section of the nerve.
  • Internal neurolysis: Removing scar tissue from inside the nerve.
  • Nerve graft: Replacing the injured part of the trigeminal nerve with a healthy section from another nerve.


Treatment for Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) Disorders

  • Botox decreases muscle spasm and enlarged muscles. Treatment involves multiple injections into the affected muscles. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration considers this treatment of TMJ disorders an off-label use of Botox.
  • Arthrocentesis: A procedure to flush a joint with a sterile solution and inject fluid to improve joint function. Your surgeon may use platelet-rich plasma, Hyalagan®, steroids or saline for this procedure.
  • Arthroscopy: A minimally invasive procedure to diagnose and repair joint problems. Using a very small incision, the surgeon inserts one tiny tube containing a small video camera to see inside the joint and determine the cause of the problem. A second tiny tube contains the instrument needed to repair the TMJ.
  • Arthroplasty: An open surgical procedure to repair the TMJ. Grafting using fat from the abdomen is often combined with an arthroplasty procedure.
  • Joint replacement: Surgery to remove the diseased or damaged TMJ. The replacement joint is typically a custom joint device created for your anatomy. In some cases, your own tissues can be used to create a new joint.


Treatment for Impacted Teeth

  • Surgery to uncover the impacted tooth and attach an orthodontic device (brace) to the tooth to help it move into the proper position.


Jaw Reconstruction Surgery

  • Bone grafting: Using healthy bone from an unrelated area to replace or expand the bone in your jaw.
  • Bone plating: A metal device to hold together bone that has fractured.
  • Dental implants: An artificial tooth that is permanently secured in the jaw.
  • Orthognathic surgery: Surgical procedures to create straight (ortho) jaws (gnathic). The type of orthognathic surgery will depend on your particular jaw reconstruction. You will often need braces before and after orthognathic surgery.
  • Distraction osteogenesis: Surgery to move two segments of bone apart slowly, so new bone can grow in the resulting gap.


Treatment for Facial Injury

  • Acute injury: Surgical repair.
  • Old injury: Surgical reconstruction (see Jaw Reconstruction Surgery)


Oral Pathology

  • Biopsy.
  • Lesion removal.
  • Reconstruction (see Jaw Reconstruction Surgery)