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Zika rates could grow in US this summer

May 04, 2016

So far, all of the Zika virus cases identified in the U.S. have been related to travel, but that’s likely to change soon. As warmer months approach, we expect to see the mosquito-borne virus spread locally in regions such as the Gulf Coast, home to Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida.

HPV vaccine proves effective yet vaccination rates remain low among teens

March 04, 2016
A new study reports that the HPV vaccine, which targets the sexually transmitted virus responsible for cervical cancer, has, since its introduction in 2006, reduced the virus’ prevalence in teenage girls by two-thirds. A reduction rate of two-thirds is quite remarkable; however, a further decline in the prevalence of HPV is possible and can be achieved simply by redirecting the HPV conversation healthcare providers have with patients and their parents.

The Zika virus and pregnancy: What you need to know

January 28, 2016
If you’re pregnant or planning to be, you may be paying attention to the news about the Zika virus. Here is an update about what we know so far.

Bladder drips and gullywashers improve after anti-incontinence surgery

September 02, 2015
When a woman has bothersome bladder leakage and is seeking to get her bladder back under her control, the first thing her provider will diagnose is whether the leakage is stress-type incontinence ("drips" small amount of urine with cough, sneeze, exercise), or urge-type incontinence (loses large volume of urine, "gullywashers" soaking pads and clothing). Stress-type drip patterns are more common, but urge incontinence can put a huge dent in your quality of life and can be terribly bothersome. Urge incontinence is also called overactive bladder, and may involve a spectrum of symptoms with urinary frequency, urgency, and leakage. Many women have a combination of symptoms and both types of leakage patterns, i.e. mixed-incontinence, and this situation can pose a dilemma to providers since the treatments for stress or urge incontinence are different - which to treat first?

Five day radiation option for women with breast cancer

August 26, 2015
Research shows that 90% of all local breast cancer recurrences happen within one centimeter from where the cancer was removed. Could we focus the radiation treatment into that area at highest risk but spare the remaining breast tissue?

I am excited to report that we have recently added a new breast cancer radiation treatment alternative for patients treated at the Swedish Cancer Institute. SAVI is a form of accelerated partial breast radiation that provides an alternative to the 6 weeks of treatment usually recommended to breast cancer patients. About a week after surgery, once we know that the cancer has been completely removed, a catheter is placed into the breast to deliver radiation treatment directly into the surgical cavity. Treatment now is delivered over five days instead of the standard 6-7 weeks of daily sessions.

Ductal carcinoma in situ - the need for individualized treatment planning

August 21, 2015
On August 20, 2015, the New York Times published an article with the provocative title, “Doubt is Raised Over Value of Surgery for Breast Lesion at Earliest Stage.” In it they reference a study by Narod reported in JAMA Oncology that looked at breast cancer death after a DCIS diagnosis. 

But, the questions addressed by the article were different than the questions generated by the research.

Eating organic may help prevent UTIs

August 18, 2015
Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are very common and becoming harder to treat due to antibiotic resistant bacteria. Where are these resistant bacteria coming from? Overuse of oral antibiotics for any suspected infection has historically been thought to be a culprit, but now there's increasing evidence that resistant bacteria are coming from the global food chain, and in particular the poultry industry. Antibiotics are commonly used in poultry feed on chicken farms to reduce the risk of E.coli infections. Drug-resistant E.coli UTIs are increasing in women who are otherwise healthy and living in the community and have no other risk factors for developing drug-resistant infections. There is increasing evidence that drug-resistant E.coli from antibiotic-treated chicken meat, then ingested by women, may contribute to the emergence of drug-resistant community-acquired UTIs.

What is a Urogynecologist and FPMRS Physician?

June 29, 2015
Doctors called urogynecologists diagnose and treat women with pelvic floor disorders which may include bothersome bowel, bladder or sexual symptoms. Although your primary care physician, gynecologist, or urologist may have knowledge about women's pelvic floor disorders (PFDs), an urogynecologist offers expertise in treating women's PFDs.

Swedish Family Medicine awarded March of Dimes CenteringPregnancy grant

June 24, 2015
The March of Dimes named Swedish Family Medicine Cherry Hill as the recipient of its CenteringPregnancy® Initiative grant. The program, developed by the Centering Healthcare Institute, is a prenatal care model in which expectant mothers are provided medical care, interactive learning, and community building in a group setting by family medicine physicians.

Restoring Body Image and Sexuality after Cancer Treatment

June 17, 2015
Your journey to wellness begins as soon as your cancer treatment ends. One of the first challenges along that path can be getting used to a body that cancer has altered. How your body looks and functions may be different and unfamiliar. It is not unusual for body image to suffer during this time, which can create stress in relationships and diminish sexual enjoyment. Regardless of gender or type of cancer, you might want to try “returning to normal,” yet the lingering impacts of cancer treatment can make this an unlikely prospect.
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