Skip to main content
Share
Print this page
Email this page link to a friend
FaceBook
Tweet this
Photo of Elizabeth Hamilton Meade

Elizabeth H. Meade, MD

Languages: English
Specialties:
Accepting New Patients
Education
Institution
Type
University of Washington
Medical School
University of California, Los Angeles
Residency
Services
Clinical Interests
  • congenital heart disease
  • infant respiratory distress syndrome
  • travel vaccination
Blog Posts
By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Wednesday, May 17, 2017
VideoPraising200

A recent study found that overpraising a child can lead to greater narcissism. What constitutes overpraising? And what happens if you don’t praise a child enough? Here are some guidelines for praising kids. You also can reward them … but not with food!


By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Monday, May 15, 2017
TimeoutVideo200

Timeouts can be used to teach and discipline kids, but they aren’t effective when an angry parent imposes a timeout in the heat of the moment. Here are situations where timeouts can work, and how parents should model the behavior they want to see in a resistant child.


By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Wednesday, May 3, 2017
MeadeSharenting200

Social media is a great tool for parents to share information about their children with friends, family and support communities. But with the ever-expanding role of social media in our lives and the depth of information to be found online, parents are often looking for guidance on how to share safely and respectfully! Your pediatrician can offer some great tips. Here are a few of mine.


By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Friday, March 17, 2017
Elizabeth Meade Speaking on Pot use200

A recent study found that more eighth- and 10th-graders are using pot since Washington legalized marijuana. And more kids don’t think pot is harmful. But marijuana can hurt teens in lasting ways. Think IQ. Here are some signs your child might be using pot and how to respond.


By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Friday, March 31, 2017
ThumbnailMeadeonLeadPoison200

Four million homes in the U.S. have high levels of lead, which can be a health hazard, especially for kids. There’s no safe level of lead in a child’s blood, so it’s crucial to get treatment if your child does have lead poisoning. Here’s how to spot it in children, and how to remove or prevent it in your home.


By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Tuesday, March 14, 2017
KidStressed200

A recent survey by the American Psychological Association says children are more stressed than parents realize, and that stress is affecting kids at younger and younger ages. Here are some signs that could mean your child is stressed and how you can help.


By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Wednesday, March 29, 2017
MeadeDiscussingImposterSyndrome200

After winning an Oscar, actress Viola Davis recently said she feels like an impostor and fears everyone will soon see her for the “hack” that she is. If you’ve ever had those feelings of self-doubt, you aren’t alone. It’s called impostor syndrome, and most of us have experienced it. These feelings deprive us of celebrating our success. Here are some ways to avoid this way of thinking.


By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Wednesday, February 22, 2017

TalktoKids200

If you’re a parent, you’ve probably struggled with knowing how to protect your kids from sex abuse. Many parents aren’t sure when to talk to children about sex abuse, or what to say. Start these conversations when your child is young. Here’s how and why – and some signs that a child may have been abused or touched inappropriately.


By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Thursday, February 2, 2017
DonateBreastMilk200

Donating breast milk can be an act of kindness for an infant in need, especially preemies and low birth-weight babies whose mothers can’t breastfeed. Breast milk contains substances that boost nutrition and prevent infection, important benefits for babies at risk. Learn more and consider donating extra milk to the Lytle Center at Swedish or Providence Regional Medical Center Everett.


By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Monday, January 23, 2017
FlupostThumb

The flu is at epidemic levels in Washington, but here’s some good news: The flu strain sweeping the state is protected by this year’s vaccine – and it’s not too late to get vaccinated. If you’re in a high-risk category for the flu, here’s what you need to know.


By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Tuesday, January 24, 2017
ColdSafetyVideoThumb

It’s been a cold winter by Seattle standards and that can pose a danger because we aren’t used to such frigid conditions. This can be especially true for children, who might ignore signs of frostbite or hypothermia because they’re having too much fun outside. Here’s how parents can protect their kiddos.



By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Wednesday, November 23, 2016
ThinkstockPhotos110884372_MomKissingBaby_200

When babies are born, they encounter bacteria for the first time as they pass through the womb and into the world. That might not sound healthy, but it is. Elizabeth Meade, M.D., assistant chief of pediatrics at Swedish, explains why.


By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Thursday, September 1, 2016

Heading back to school can be an exciting time, but it also can be fraught with anxiety, especially for kids who are bullied. If you think your child is a target, there are ways you can help. And if you suspect that your child is a bully, there also are things you can do. Watch this video to learn more.



By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Friday, August 26, 2016
Being kind isn’t just the right thing to do. Studies show that it’s also good for your health. This video explains how being kind is good medicine for you and others. And parents, learn how to model kindness for your kids and practice it as a family.
 


By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Tuesday, January 19, 2016

You may have heard of the Zika virus and be wondering what the dangers are and who should be concerned. The CDC has issued an advisory for pregnant women and those trying to become pregnant.


By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Wednesday, January 20, 2016

There is a quiet public health crisis in the US that is unknown to many parents and even physicians. Addiction to opiates, or narcotics, has skyrocketed. It is estimated that more than 2 million Americans abuse prescription opiate drugs, and we are now seeing increasing rates of heroin use for the first time in decades. This epidemic includes children.


By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Monday, June 8, 2015

A study recently reported that melanoma rates have risen 250% in children and young adults since the 1970s.  Another study found that between 1973 and 2009, pediatric melanomas (age 19 or younger) increased by 2% per year.  As medical providers we are seeing an upward trend in skin cancers in all age groups – but predominantly among young women, which is thought to be due to tanning practices.  We also know that even rare sunburns early in childhood can dramatically increase risk for melanoma later in life.  There are lots of ways that parents can help protect children from sun exposure – here are some tips to help us do our best as summer approaches!


By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Monday, November 24, 2014
Do you know what an e-cigarette is?  Does your child?  You may be surprised.  In 2012, 1.78 million U.S. students reported having used e-cigarettes.  And that number has only continued to increase.  Our communities have been slow to realize the impact of electronic cigarettes on our children, but this is an issue parents and pediatricians need to tackle head-on ...

By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Monday, September 1, 2014

For most parents, the newborn period is a time of profound joy, incredible challenges, and LOTS of questions.  As pediatricians, some of the questions we are frequently asked are related to a simple blood test done on all infants in Washington State.  Commonly referred to as the “newborn screen” or “NBS”, “PKU”, or “newborn metabolic testing”, this test checks for several congenital disorders that are rare but can be life-threatening. 

Often parents want to know:

  • What does the test involve? The newborn screen is done by pricking the heel of the infant at around 24 hours of age, then collecting a few drops of blood onto a piece of test paper.  This is dried and then sent to the state lab, where the testing is performed.  Because some of the conditions may take several days to show up, the test is repeated at 7-14 days old (usually by your primary care doctor; it can also ...


By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Friday, February 28, 2014
Winter can seem like one long continuous “sick day” for families - kids pick up frequent infections at school or daycare and pass them around to everyone at home.  Often it feels like by the time the illness has worked its way through the household, a new one has started!  Even for physicians, it can sometimes be difficult to distinguish between viral and bacterial infections.  Since antibiotics cannot treat viruses, they are often over-prescribed - which can lead to significant side effects in children and also contributes bacteria becoming resistant to existing medications.  In November 2013, the American Academy of Pediatrics released an updated guidance regarding antibiotic treatment, helping answer the frequently asked question about when kids need antibiotics.

Here's what you should know about antibiotics in these situations:

  • Ear infections ...

By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Monday, December 30, 2013

In 2012, Washington passed legislation to legalize marijuana use for people 21 and over.  While still illegal for those under 21, it is important to understand how this might affect adolescents and children.

Facts about marijuana and teens:

  • In a 2009 national study, 32.8% of 12th graders had used marijuana in the last year, and 20.6% within the last month.
  • One in eight adolescents who start using marijuana by age 14 become dependent.
  • When prolonged marijuana use starts in the teen years it is linked to a significant drop in IQ points - and the decrease is irreparable.
  • Marijuana can affect memory and concentration, cause or exacerbate depression/anxiety/hallucinations, and negatively affect asthma and other chronic lung diseases.
  • Marijuana is much more potent now than in the past.  In 2012 the average concentration of THC in marijuana was 15% (compared to just 4% in the 1980s).
  • Harmful effects...

By: Elizabeth Hamilton Meade, MD
Friday, December 13, 2013

As the holidays approach, parents often wonder what toys are safe for their little ones.  When making your list and checking it twice, here are some tips to ensure that toys are appropriate for the age and developmental stage of your giftees.

For younger children/infants:

  • Make sure all parts are larger than the child’s mouth.  Most children age 3 and under consistently put toys in their mouth, and some older children do as well.  A small-parts tester, or “no-choke tube” is about the size of a small child’s airway and can be purchased to test parts if you are unsure.  If a part or toy fits inside the tube, it’s too small to be safe.
  • When buying stuffed toys, look for embroidered or secured parts rather than pieces (such as eyes or noses) that could be removed and swallowed.  Remove all loose strings and ribbons.  Avoid animals with stuffing made of small pellets or material that could cause ...
1720287444
 
Affiliated Facilities
Swedish Cherry Hill
Swedish First Hill
Swedish Edmonds