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Swedish caregivers recognized as Top Doctors and Nurse Practitioners

September 15, 2014

Dozens of Swedish caregivers were recently recognized by Seattle Metropolitan magazine’s annual Top Doctors and Nurse Practitioners feature.

The 2014 rankings include nearly 50 Swedish caregivers and draws from peer endorsements of more than 1,400 doctors, nurses and physician assistants in the Seattle metropolitan area. Nearly 13,000 nominations were narrowed down by an anonymous advisory panel. The panel’s criteria included such items as years of experience, competency, patient rapport and satisfaction and compliance with care recommendations.

Below you will find a list of Swedish providers recognized with this year’s top honor. A complete list of providers can also be found online.

Construction Begins on Biggest Project at Swedish Edmonds in 40 Years

September 12, 2014

300 Guests Celebrate Hospital’s Half-Century History and Building for the Future

EDMONDS, WA — Sept. 12, 2014 — The mood was festive as about 300 community members celebrated the hospital’s 50th anniversary and groundbreaking milestones at Swedish Edmonds on Wednesday. Shovels plunged into dirt that will be covered one year from now by a two-story, 77,000-square-foot facility to include a new emergency department (ED), urgent care center, observation unit, outpatient diagnostic imaging center, new lobby, front entry, 37,000-square-foot shelled second floor and more.

“This is a historic moment for the community we serve at Swedish Edmonds,” said David Jaffe, chief executive at the hospital. “With this new facility, we can meet the growing healthcare needs for decades to come and offer an unmatched patient experience.”

The hospital opened in 1964 as a result of voters approving the establishment of Snohomish County Public Hospital District #2 in 1962. Back then, the entire facility and property cost $2 million. The new expansion will cost over $60 million.

When the building is constructed, a time capsule will be placed in a cornerstone of the building and a small plaque will identify the location. Along with hospital-related objects destined for the time capsule, a Hostess Twinkie will also go inside to test the urban myth about shelf life for the cream-filled sponge cake snack.

What you need to know about Enterovirus D68

September 12, 2014

Recently, there has been a lot of discussion in the media about a severe type of respiratory illness affecting many children, mainly in the Midwest.  The respiratory illness, caused by an infection with Enterovirus D68, is scary to parents, because it’s hard to differentiate whether their child is ill from this particular virus or just has one of the many other viruses that cause cold- and flu-like symptoms around this time of year.
 
Sometimes media reports leave families with more questions than answers, which is why Dr. Dianne Glover, one of Swedish’s pediatric infectious disease specialists, wanted to share this information with you:

  • Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an unusual form of an otherwise common group of viruses referred to as Enteroviruses.  These are hardy viruses that usually spread by the respiratory route, but can also spread b...

KING 5, PSBJ Cover Swedish's Level IV NICU Designation

September 11, 2014

KING 5’s Teresa Yuan reports on Swedish’s newly designated Level IV neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), one of only two serving the region. The NICU is located at Swedish’s First Hill hospital in Seattle.

Watch the KING 5 clip here.

Last week Puget Sound Business Journal reporter Greg Lamm covered the new designation.

Read the PSBJ story here.

KING 5, PSBJ cover Swedish's Level IV NICU designation

September 11, 2014

KING 5’s Teresa Yuan reports on Swedish’s newly designated Level IV neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), one of only two serving the region. The NICU is located at Swedish’s First Hill hospital in Seattle.

Last week Puget Sound Business Journal reporter Greg Lamm covered the new designation.

Read the PSBJ story here.

Olaparib Tablet Safe in Pretreated Ovarian Cancer Patients; More Effective in Those With BRCA Mutations

September 09, 2014

American Association for Cancer Research News Release

SEATTLE — Sept. 9, 2014 — An oral tablet form of a PARP inhibitor, olaparib, given in combination with chemotherapy, was safe in heavily pretreated ovarian cancer patients, and patients with BRCA mutations may have a better response compared with those without a BRCA mutation, according to phase Ib clinical trial data presented at the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research-AACR 10th Biennial Ovarian Cancer Research Symposium, held Sept. 8-9.

“This study is one of the first studies to use olaparib tablets instead of olaparib capsules,” said Saul Rivkin, MD, founder and chairman of the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research, and a research scientist at the Swedish Cancer Institute, both in Seattle, Washington. “The goal was to find the maximum tolerated dose of olaparib tablets plus weekly metronomic carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with relapsed ovarian cancer.

KOMO 4 Covers Swedish 'POEM' Procedure

September 09, 2014

KOMO 4’s Molly Shen tells viewers about a new procedure being offered at Swedish Medical Center. Per oral endoscopic myotomy (also known as ‘POEM’) is only being offered in Washington State at Swedish.

View the clip on KOMO 4 here.

Olaparib tablet safe in pretreated ovarian cancer patients; More effective in those with BRCA mutations

September 09, 2014

American Association for Cancer Research News Release

SEATTLE — Sept. 9, 2014 — An oral tablet form of a PARP inhibitor, olaparib, given in combination with chemotherapy, was safe in heavily pretreated ovarian cancer patients, and patients with BRCA mutations may have a better response compared with those without a BRCA mutation, according to phase Ib clinical trial data presented at the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research-AACR 10th Biennial Ovarian Cancer Research Symposium, held Sept. 8-9.

“This study is one of the first studies to use olaparib tablets instead of olaparib capsules,” said Saul Rivkin, MD, founder and chairman of the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research, and a research scientist at the Swedish Cancer Institute, both in Seattle, Washington. “The goal was to find the maximum tolerated dose of olaparib tablets plus weekly metronomic carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with relapsed ovarian cancer.

Newborn screening testing in Washington

September 01, 2014

For most parents, the newborn period is a time of profound joy, incredible challenges, and LOTS of questions.  As pediatricians, some of the questions we are frequently asked are related to a simple blood test done on all infants in Washington State.  Commonly referred to as the “newborn screen” or “NBS”, “PKU”, or “newborn metabolic testing”, this test checks for several congenital disorders that are rare but can be life-threatening. 

Often parents want to know:

  • What does the test involve? The newborn screen is done by pricking the heel of the infant at around 24 hours of age, then collecting a few drops of blood onto a piece of test paper.  This is dried and then sent to the state lab, where the testing is performed.  Because some of the conditions may take several days to show up, the test is repeated at 7-14 days old (usually by your primary care doctor; it can also ...

Preparing your teen for college and taking care of their health

August 27, 2014

College is a huge and exciting step in an adolescent’s development. Being prepared can help your teen stay healthy and know where to go when they’re not. Whether your child is staying close to home, or going across the country for school, here are a few tips to add to your college checklist:

Schedule a visit with your primary care physician. (See a list of local Swedish physicians who can see your teen here.)

  • Physicians can make sure your teen is up to date on immunizations that many colleges require. Teens commonly need influenza, Tdap, HPV, and meningococcal vaccines.

  • Ensure that your child has prescriptions (with refills) for all medications they routinely use. Even “as needed” medicines may become needed in college. These medicines should be kept in a locked box in your teen’s room, as many medications can be st...

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