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Putting the science into action: helping children benefit from reading

October 29, 2014
It is astonishing to me how important it is to read to children from an early age. Research tells us there are short term and long lasting benefits from exposing children to books and language from the beginning. In an exciting progression, the idea of early literacy has moved from academia to policy. Supporting parent engagement and early literacy programs is a core part of Washington’s Early Learning System.

Early literacy does not mean early reading. Early literacy emphasizes positive exposure to a literacy-rich environment. Many important reading concepts begin before kindergarten. Studies show us that a child’s early literacy environment (age 0-3) plays a crucial role in school success and reading ability. Children enter kindergarten with different knowledge levels. Those who enter with the least knowledge of beginning reading skills are at academic risk.

The benefits of early literacy do not stop at kindergarten; it continues throughout the school years. Frequen...

How to deal with temper tantrums in toddlers

October 15, 2014
We’ve all been there during that screaming fit in the grocery store because your 2 year old just HAS to have that particular treat off the shelf, and when we say no….it (a temper tantrum) all begins.

Why do toddlers tantrum?

A tantrum is the expression of a young child's frustration with the challenges of the moment and their inability to manage that frustration in any other constructive way. This is part of the normal development of children. For some toddlers, tantrums happen when they can’t figure out a particular task; for others they just can’t find the words to express his or her thoughts or feelings. Whatever the challenge, frustration with the situation might trigger anger — resulting in a temper tantrum. Since tantrums are an expression of powerlessness, toddlers who feel some control over their lives may have many fewer tantrums. Remember, if your child is thirsty, hungry or tired, his or her threshold for frustration ...

7 benefits of eating together as a family

October 13, 2014
Regular family meals are good for children and for the family as a whole! Here's why:

1. Eating together encourages family togetherness
  • Positive family mealtimes help family members maintain relationships and feel a sense of belonging
  • When children can count on regular time with a parent or adults, they feel loved, safe and secure
  • Children set roots for a lifetime as they experience their family’s values and traditions

2. Eating together fosters happy, well-adjusted kids
  • Kids can feel accepted by their family and may not need to seek approval from the wrong crowd
  • Adolescents are less likely to be depressed and generally have a better self- esteem
  • Adolescents are less likely to smoke cigarettes, use marijuana, illegal drugs or alcohol

3. Eating together helps kids do better in school
  • Listening to grownups at ...

Should I Consider a Tummy Tuck (Abdominoplasty)?

October 09, 2014
A tummy tuck operation may help you restore the abdmonial contour that you may have lost after having children.

Medical Mission in Ethiopia - Week 2

September 22, 2014

Monday, September 22, 2014

We have been in Gondar 5 days now. Honestly, the first day here, I cried. I wondered what we were doing thinking we could live in a developing country for a school year. We are fortunate to be experiencing this as a family, as the necessary hugs to persevere are readily available. It has been interesting to me that the family seems to decompensate in a serial fashion. The other three support the decompensated one until they can function again, and then life is okay for a time, until someone else crumbles. So far all four of us have gone through some difficult emotional times. Food and sleep definitely help. Everyone has slept through the night for two nights now, and the emotional break downs are more sporadic.

I have had a difficult time getting used to so many people asking for money, touching me, shaking my hand and yelling “hello!!!” from across the street. Josh seems to have handled this the best, returning the “hellos” and handshakes. But today even he said that it is exhausting. “I’m just another human being, can’t they see that?” He also reflected that in the U.S., “it’s just not right to surround people, and if you do get surrounded, it’s dangerous.” We recognize that it is not dangerous here. But we are a spectacle, especially the kids. I think people are used to seeing white adult tourists, NGO workers, and some hospital or university faculty, but white children with red and blond hair? Last night our quiet courtyard (and attached reception hall) was rented out for a wedding. Josh and Sonja had been playing soccer (futball) in the courtyard when the wedding party just showed up. Soon, about 15-20 young men who had come to the wedding were playing futball with Josh. Sonja wisely escaped and found the musician playing the local ukulele instrument, but Josh hung in there. The game became quite lively and physical with lots of fancy footwork and exuberant vocalizations. Many of the young men took selfies with Josh, and by the end he had shaken many hands. Perhaps it is a cross cultural phenomenon that young men would rather play a futball game than attend a wedding reception.

Medical mission in Ethiopia - week 2

September 22, 2014

Monday, September 22, 2014

We have been in Gondar 5 days now. Honestly, the first day here, I cried. I wondered what we were doing thinking we could live in a developing country for a school year. We are fortunate to be experiencing this as a family, as the necessary hugs to persevere are readily available. It has been interesting to me that the family seems to decompensate in a serial fashion. The other three support the decompensated one until they can function again, and then life is okay for a time, until someone else crumbles. So far all four of us have gone through some difficult emotional times. Food and sleep definitely help. Everyone has slept through the night for two nights now, and the emotional break downs are more sporadic.

I have had a difficult time getting used to so many people asking for money, touching me, shaking my hand and yelling “hello!!!” from across the street. Josh seems to have handled this the best, returning the “hellos” and handshakes. But today even he said that it is exhausting. “I’m just another human being, can’t they see that?” He also reflected that in the U.S., “it’s just not right to surround people, and if you do get surrounded, it’s dangerous.” We recognize that it is not dangerous here. But we are a spectacle, especially the kids. I think people are used to seeing white adult tourists, NGO workers, and some hospital or university faculty, but white children with red and blond hair? Last night our quiet courtyard (and attached reception hall) was rented out for a wedding. Josh and Sonja had been playing soccer (futball) in the courtyard when the wedding party just showed up. Soon, about 15-20 young men who had come to the wedding were playing futball with Josh. Sonja wisely escaped and found the musician playing the local ukulele instrument, but Josh hung in there. The game became quite lively and physical with lots of fancy footwork and exuberant vocalizations. Many of the young men took selfies with Josh, and by the end he had shaken many hands. Perhaps it is a cross cultural phenomenon that young men would rather play a futball game than attend a wedding reception.

Using technology to help educate, prepare, and distract kids in the hospital

September 22, 2014
The hospital can be a scary place for any patient, and even more so for children. iPads have been around for nearly four years and in that time they have expanded the way children are educated, prepared, distracted, and provided normalization in the pediatric areas of the hospital.

Educating kids

An iPad allows staff to teach patients about a new diagnosis while making it fun and interactive. An iPad provides a visual and hands on way to teach about a diagnosis and also make sure the patient understands their diagnosis. There are many apps designed by healthcare professionals for diagnosis education with kids. Some of these applications include: “Medikidz explains Type One Diabetes”, “Blast Those Blasts” (for children with cancer, specifically leukemia), “Flow Breather” (for children with cystic fibrosis) and “Wellapets- Asthma Education Pets for Kids.”

Helping kids prepare for a procedure or ...

Medical Mission to Ethiopia - Week 1

September 19, 2014

September 13-14, 2014

Today we fly to Ethiopia. It has been several months in the planning, almost a year really. Although my initial announcement of my family’s plans was met with some hesitation, the recent outpouring of support has truly been overwhelming. My Swedish family is extraordinary. Patients, staff and colleagues have wished us well. Our Swedish OB/GYN Issaquah (SOGI) group has been through some challenges these last three years, many related to astronomical growth. But today, as I head to the other side of the world, I can look back and see that some of those challenges have made SOGI an incredibly strong and awesome practice. This is probably the best “well wishes” gift I could have received, to leave a practice that is doing well. This practice we have worked so hard to build is positively solid. And I feel that I am bringing some of that strength with me. At our annual clinic picnic I said that I could not do this trip without them, and that I feel I am bringing a piece of everyone with me. I believe that.

This morning we will land in Addis Ababa. We head to a small clinic about one hour from the center of the city. Blue Nile Children’s Organization (BNCO) serves a very poor area of Addis. We will stay there for a few days. BNCO is starting “Delivery Services” this year, which is Ethiopian for midwifery care. The sign actually says “Deliviery Services,” but it’s doubtful many people will notice a little detail like an extra “I.” Hmmmm. I know a little something about starting “delivery services.” In fact, the nurses and docs at First Hill L&D all have fleeces that say “We Deliver.” It’s the other side of the world, but we are all still people, working together to make something happen.

Medical mission to Ethiopia - week 1

September 19, 2014

September 13-14, 2014

Today we fly to Ethiopia. It has been several months in the planning, almost a year really. Although my initial announcement of my family’s plans was met with some hesitation, the recent outpouring of support has truly been overwhelming. My Swedish family is extraordinary. Patients, staff and colleagues have wished us well. Our Swedish OB/GYN Issaquah (SOGI) group has been through some challenges these last three years, many related to astronomical growth. But today, as I head to the other side of the world, I can look back and see that some of those challenges have made SOGI an incredibly strong and awesome practice. This is probably the best “well wishes” gift I could have received, to leave a practice that is doing well. This practice we have worked so hard to build is positively solid. And I feel that I am bringing some of that strength with me. At our annual clinic picnic I said that I could not do this trip without them, and that I feel I am bringing a piece of everyone with me. I believe that.

This morning we will land in Addis Ababa. We head to a small clinic about one hour from the center of the city. Blue Nile Children’s Organization (BNCO) serves a very poor area of Addis. We will stay there for a few days. BNCO is starting “Delivery Services” this year, which is Ethiopian for midwifery care. The sign actually says “Deliviery Services,” but it’s doubtful many people will notice a little detail like an extra “I.” Hmmmm. I know a little something about starting “delivery services.” In fact, the nurses and docs at First Hill L&D all have fleeces that say “We Deliver.” It’s the other side of the world, but we are all still people, working together to make something happen.

Swedish Caregivers Recognized as 'Top Doctors and Nurse Practitioners'

September 15, 2014

Dozens of Swedish caregivers were recently recognized by Seattle Metropolitan magazine’s annual Top Doctors and Nurse Practitioners feature.

The 2014 rankings include nearly 50 Swedish caregivers and draws from peer endorsements of more than 1,400 doctors, nurses and physician assistants in the Seattle metropolitan area. Nearly 13,000 nominations were narrowed down by an anonymous advisory panel. The panel’s criteria included such items as years of experience, competency, patient rapport and satisfaction and compliance with care recommendations.

Below you will find a list of Swedish providers recognized with this year’s top honor. A complete list of providers can also be found online.

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