SNI Blog

SNI Blog

Deep brain stimulation for dystonia

Peggy Shortt, MN, ARNP

Peggy Shortt, MN, ARNP
Manager, Swedish Deep Brain Stimulation Program


Swedish DBS (Deep Brain Stimulation) patient Ian Curtis shares his story with the community in a segment that aired on KUOW last week.  He was interviewed with internationally recognized neurosurgeon Andres Lozano who was visiting Seattle. Click here to read or hear the story from KUOW.

Drug treatment and weight loss restores vision in a blinding disorder linked to obesity

Steven R. Hamilton, MD

Steven R. Hamilton, MD
Neuro-Ophthalmology at Swedish Neuroscience Institute

As many as 100,000 Americans suffer from a disorder called pseudotumor cerebri or idiopathic intracranial hypertension that can cause permanent blindness and chronic headaches. The disease primarily strikes obese women of reproductive age with symptoms of daily headaches, visual symptoms including transient blurring or blindness, double vision, and pulsating noises in one’s head. Up to 5-10% of these patients may have permanent visual loss due to optic nerve damage.
 
A recent national trial funded by the National Institute of Health’s National Eye Institute has shown that a common water pill, acetazolamide, combined with a moderate but comprehensive dietary and lifestyle modification plan can restore and preserve vision in women with this disease. I was one of the local investigators for this trial along with Dr. Eugene May.
 
The symptoms of pseudotumor cerebri are thought to be due to high spinal fluid pressure around the optic nerves and brain due to impaired reabsorption of spinal fluid that is continuously being produced within the brain. This results in chronic headaches and swelling of the optic nerves that can lead to permanent blindness if left untreated. Patients typically are ...

Supporting patients with Parkinson's Disease

Peggy Shortt, MN, ARNP

Peggy Shortt, MN, ARNP
Manager, Swedish Deep Brain Stimulation Program

On Saturday, May 17, Swedish was well represented at the Washington Chapter of the American Parkinson’s Disease Annual Magic of Hope Dinner and Auction.  Several of our Swedish Neuroscience Institute providers, patients, caregivers, families, and distinguished community members attended the event, and contributed toward a successful fund raiser.  Swedish offered a generous donation to help sponsor the event, and Swedish patient and his wife David and Nancy Jones contributed a generous financial gift for programs and services for those living with Parkinson’s Disease in our communities.

Swedish is proud to partner with the APDA to support research, education, programs and services that stay in our community to benefit those living with Parkinson's Disease.

Pituitary Tumors: Diagnosis and Management

Erin Kieper

Erin Kieper
Program Development Manager, Swedish Radiosurgery Center

The Swedish Pituitary Center at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute is one of the country’s largest centers for treating disorders of the pituitary gland – including pituitary tumors. The center brings together endocrinologists, neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists to offer a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and treatment of these tumors.
 
Tumors in the pituitary gland are quite common and many of them are so small they may go undetected throughout life. Although 99 percent of pituitary tumors are benign, the associated symptoms can be
debilitating, especially with hormone-secreting tumors. Regardless of the type of tumor, individuals with pituitary tumors may experience headaches, blurred vision, impotence/infertility, and mood changes.

Update from essential tremor (ET) forum

Peggy Shortt, MN, ARNP

Peggy Shortt, MN, ARNP
Manager, Swedish Deep Brain Stimulation Program

On Saturday, January 25, essential tremor (ET) patients in the community gathered for a symposium on the diagnosis, medical management and interventions for the treatment of tremor.  Swedish planned the event in collaboration with the International Essential Tremor Foundation.  Over 120 people in our community gathered to learn and share their stories. Dr. Gwinn discussed the MR Focused Ultrasound study, Gamma Knife, and Deep Brain Stimulation as treatment options for essential tremor.  Patients also shared their experiences with DBS.  It was a great event!

Debilitating Facial Pain May Be Trigeminal Neuralgia

Dean Hamilton, ARNP

Dean Hamilton, ARNP
ARNP, Swedish Cerebrovascular Center

All pain can be frightening, but when patients describe sharp, electric-type pain in their face, the cause may be Trigeminal Neuralgia, a treatable pain syndrome manifesting as unilateral facial pain that can be severe in intensity. The pain occurs in one or more distributions of the trigeminal nerve. The pain usually lasts for several seconds to several minutes followed by periods of being pain free. Trigeminal neuralgia pain can be triggered by sensory stimuli to the face including talking, brushing teeth, eating, and touching the face. In some cases, there is no trigger. The annual incidence of trigeminal neuralgia is approximately 4 in 100,000. The initial workup for trigeminal neuralgia may include an MRI of the brain to rule out brain tumor or MS plaques.

In many cases, trigeminal neuralgia is caused by compression of the facial nerve most commonly by the superior cerebellar artery or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, although trigeminal neuralgia can be due to compression by a persistent permanent trigeminal artery or odioectatic basilar artery. Other causes of Trigeminal Neuralgia can include demyelinating disease (such as multiple sclerosis) and tumor. In some cases, the cause of Trigeminal Neuralgia is  ...

January 25 essential tremor seminar

Tami Bloom

Tami Bloom
Business Development Specialist, Swedish Neuroscience Institute

If you or someone you care about shakes a lot—it could be essential tremor (ET) or another movement disorder. Essential tremor is a disorder affecting approximately 10 million Americans. This progressive neurological condition can cause the hands, head, voice, legs or trunk of the body to shake and can cause significant disability. It is often confused with Parkinson’s disease or dystonia. Because of stereotypes and lack of awareness, many people with ET never seek medical care, though most would benefit from treatment.
 
In an upcoming event, Dr. Ryder Gwinn will explain the causes, diagnosis,  research and treatment options for essential tremor.
 
Date: Saturday, January 25
Time: Check-in 9:30am/Program 10am-Noon
Location: Bellevue Hilton, 300 112 Ave SE, Bellevue, WA
 
There is no charge for the event but please note, parking in the Bellevue Hilton lot is $5.

Registration is required - call 888-387-3667 or visit www.essentialtremor.org/seminars

 

 
 
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Top Authors

Karen Pabillon
John W Henson IV

John W Henson IV
Director, Neurology

Peggy Shortt, MN, ARNP

Peggy Shortt, MN, ARNP
Manager, Swedish Deep Brain Stimulation Program

Erin Kieper

Erin Kieper
Program Development Manager, Swedish Radiosurgery Center