Conditions Treated

The Center for Neurologic Restoration offers minimally invasive, personalized surgical treatment for a wide variety of chronic neurologic conditions that can keep you from a full life.

Chronic Pain
Dementia
Epilepsy (pediatric and adult)
Movement Disorders
Neurobehavioral Disorders

Chronic Pain 

Trigeminal neuralgia: Trigeminal neuralgia is a condition characterized by episodes of severe facial pain that occur in areas of your face where the trigeminal nerve supplies normal sensation: cheek, jaw, teeth, gums and lips, and sometimes the eyes or forehead. This condition causes sudden, sharp pain, usually only on one side of your face.

If you have trigeminal neuralgia, you may initially experience attacks that last from a few seconds to several minutes. But trigeminal neuralgia can progress, causing longer, more frequent bouts of searing pain. Learn more about trigeminal neuralgia here.

Failed back surgery syndrome: You may have this condition if you have pain in the back or legs after one or more spine surgeries. This may be due to continuing compression, scarring, arachnoiditis (inflammation of the spinal cord) or nerve injury. Sometimes the cause is not obvious on imaging, but neuromodulation techniques (altering nerve activity) often can be used to successfully treat the pain.

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS): This condition involves chronic pain that develops after injury to an arm, leg, hand or foot. If you have CRPS, you may gradually recover over time. Severe cases can lead to long-term disability. Nerve damage is believed to cause CRPS. CRPS-I refers to cases where nerve injury hasn’t been confirmed. CRPS-II involves cases with confirmed nerve injuries.

Occipital Neuralgia: Occipital neuralgia is a chronic condition characterized by severe pain in your upper neck, back of the head and behind the ears. These areas of pain correspond to the location of the greater and lesser occipital nerves, which run from the base of your neck up the back of your head to your scalp. Nerve injury or irritation can cause occipital neuralgia, but often no cause can be found.

Chiari 1 malformation: This neurological condition occurs when the cerebellum, the part of the brain that controls balance, extends out of the brain and into the spinal area. This results in compression of the brain and spinal cord. The most common symptom of Chiari 1 malformation is a headache in the back of the head. Other symptoms can vary greatly but they include problems with balance, numbness, muscle weakness, dizziness and trouble swallowing. If you have Chiari 1 malformation and it’s worsening or interfering with daily life, your doctor may recommend surgery. This is done to relieve pressure on the brain and restore the normal flow of cerebrospinal fluid.

Dementia

Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH): This brain disorder usually occurs in adults 60 and older, and gradually over time. It occurs when cerebrospinal fluid doesn’t drain properly and accumulates in your brain. This creates pressure on your brain and causes a decline in thinking skills and changes in personality and behavior. If you have NPH, you also may have trouble walking and lose control of your bladder. Learn more about NPH here.

Epilepsy (pediatric and adult)

Epilepsy is a seizure disorder associated with abnormal electrical activity in your brain. There are many possible causes for these seizures, such as brain abnormalities, complications during or just after birth and a family history of seizures. But often doctors can’t pinpoint a cause.

A seizure can cause a sensory disturbance (changes in taste, smell and physical feelings), loss of consciousness and convulsions. You can be diagnosed with epilepsy if you have at least two unrelated seizures that are not caused by drugs, alcohol withdrawal or extremely low blood pressure. Learn more about our nationally known program to treat epilepsy here.

Movement Disorders

Essential Tremor: This is the most common type of movement disorder, and more common as we age.  Symptoms occur when you’re moving rather than when you’re at rest. They may include rhythmic movement of your arms, hands, head or trunk, and a quivering voice. Essential tremor is sometimes inherited.

Parkinson’s disease: This neurological disorder develops when your brain stops producing dopamine, which promotes normal brain function. Symptoms may include tremors, stiffness, slowness and balance problems.

Dystonia: This disorder is associated with involuntary muscle contractions. These are typically slow repetitive movements or abnormal posturing (rigid body movements and abnormal body positions) that can be painful. Dystonia may affect certain muscle groups or your entire body. The cause of dystonia isn’t known but some cases may be genetic.

Spasticity: This term refers to spasms and muscle stiffness. Spasticity often is linked with spinal cord and brain injury, stroke or other conditions such as cerebral palsy and multiple sclerosis. Spasticity can be painful, hurt your mobility and coordination, and interfere with your daily activities.

Learn more about movement disorders here.

Neurobehavioral Disorders

Obsessive compulsive disorder: Commonly known as OCD, obsessive compulsive disorder is characterized by uncontrollable, repetitive thoughts and behaviors. OCD can cause anxiety and interfere with your daily life.

Tourette’s syndrome: This neurological disorder usually begins in childhood. Symptoms include repetitive, involuntary physical movements and sounds that are called tics. Tics often are worse when you are excited or anxious.

To schedule a consultation with one of our specialists, call the Center for Neurologic Restoration at 206-320-4145.