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Swedish Cancer Institute Launches New Hematologic Malignancies Program

September 08, 2014

International hematology expert Dr. John Pagel recruited to expand Swedish’s treatment for, and research on, blood cancers

SEATTLE — September 8, 2014 — The Swedish Cancer Institute is launching a Hematologic Malignancies program for the expanded treatment and research of blood-based cancers such as leukemia, multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Newly recruited international hematology expert John Pagel, M.D., Ph.D., will serve as chief of the new program, which launches this month.

“Dr. Pagel brings with him a world-class reputation for research and excellence in patient care,” said Swedish Cancer Institute Executive Director Thomas Brown, M.D. “This new program will add to our existing strengths in caring for patients with hematologic malignancies and further develop our autologous hematopoietic stem cell program. These efforts allow the Swedish Cancer Institute to continue providing the most versatile and comprehensive cancer care in the Pacific Northwest.”

Dr. Pagel’s practice will include caring for patients with acute and chronic leukemias, multiple myeloma, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, and myelodysplastic syndromes, as well as other myeloproliferative disorders. In addition to providing established treatments such as autologous stem cell transplants, the program will develop novel therapies for the treatment of blood-based diseases through research collaborations and studies initiated by Swedish Cancer Institute physicians.

Swedish Cancer Institute launches new hematologic malignancies program

September 08, 2014

International hematology expert Dr. John Pagel recruited to expand Swedish’s treatment for, and research on, blood cancers

SEATTLE — September 8, 2014 — The Swedish Cancer Institute is launching a Hematologic Malignancies program for the expanded treatment and research of blood-based cancers such as leukemia, multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Newly recruited international hematology expert John Pagel, M.D., Ph.D., will serve as chief of the new program, which launches this month.

“Dr. Pagel brings with him a world-class reputation for research and excellence in patient care,” said Swedish Cancer Institute Executive Director Thomas Brown, M.D. “This new program will add to our existing strengths in caring for patients with hematologic malignancies and further develop our autologous hematopoietic stem cell program. These efforts allow the Swedish Cancer Institute to continue providing the most versatile and comprehensive cancer care in the Pacific Northwest.”

Dr. Pagel’s practice will include caring for patients with acute and chronic leukemias, multiple myeloma, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, and myelodysplastic syndromes, as well as other myeloproliferative disorders. In addition to providing established treatments such as autologous stem cell transplants, the program will develop novel therapies for the treatment of blood-based diseases through research collaborations and studies initiated by Swedish Cancer Institute physicians.

Dr. James Bowen to speak about Multiple Sclerosis at Tacoma Science Cafe

September 06, 2014

Join us for a talk and casual discussion at the next Tacoma Science Cafe.
 
Speaker:          Dr. James Bowen, M.D., MS Center Neurologist and Medical Director
 
Talk:                Multiple Sclerosis in the Pacific Northwest
 
Date:               Tuesday, September 9
 
Time:               6:30 p.m.
 
Location ....

Swedish Provides Washington's First 'POEM' Procedure

September 05, 2014

Per oral endoscopic myotomy could help a range of esophageal, stomach disorders

SEATTLE — September 05, 2014— Swedish surgeons became the first in Washington State to perform a Per Oral Endoscopic Myotomy (POEM) procedure when they successfully treated a 36-year-old patient diagnosed with a rare esophageal disorder known as achalasia.

POEM involves inserting an endoscope in the patient’s esophagus through the mouth. Once in place, surgeons use several instruments placed though a channel in the endoscope to treat the affected area. In the case of Washington’s first patient to undergo the procedure, a team of Swedish surgeons led by Ralph Aye, M.D., and Brian Louie, M.D., cut though the inner wall of the esophagus to place the endoscope between the inner esophageal layer and the outer muscular wall. By cutting the inner most muscle layer, pressure created by the valve between the esophagus and the stomach was relieved and the patient’s case was treated successfully.

Multiple Sclerosis and the Winter Blues

September 05, 2014
Many people with Multiple Sclerosis look forward to the cooler temperatures and reduced humidity that comes with fall and winter. Symptoms can be worse in the warm summer months so relief comes to many with the lower temperatures. With fall and winter right around the corner, it’s important to be aware of and prepare for the Winter Blues. 
 
The Winter Blues is fairly common in northern latitudes where the days become shorter and there is reduced sunlight.  The Winter Blues is often characterized by feeling irritable or gloomy, having less energy, sleeping more but not feeling more rested, and eating more, often with cravings for carbohydrates.  So what can one do to prevent the Winter Blues?

Swedish First Hill NICU Earns Level IV Designation

September 04, 2014

Washington State Department of Health designates Swedish First Hill as a top care center for newborns

SEATTLE — September 4, 2014Swedish Medical Center announced today that the Washington State Department of Health has designated its First Hill neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as a Level IV regional NICU. This designation places Swedish First Hill among an elite group of care centers in Washington – and one of only two facilities in Seattle – with the capabilities to provide the highest level of treatment for critically ill and premature newborns.

“Infants born early or with life-threatening conditions need instant access to specialized care and a gifted team of caregivers,” said Melissa Cate, R.N., M.N., MBA, system administrative director for Women’s, Infants and Children’s Services at Swedish Medical Center. “Swedish First Hill is honored to provide the highest level of neonatal services to families in this region.”

Swedish First Hill NICU earns Level IV designation

September 04, 2014

Washington State Department of Health designates Swedish First Hill as a top care center for newborns

SEATTLE — September 4, 2014Swedish Medical Center announced today that the Washington State Department of Health has designated its First Hill neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as a Level IV regional NICU. This designation places Swedish First Hill among an elite group of care centers in Washington – and one of only two facilities in Seattle – with the capabilities to provide the highest level of treatment for critically ill and premature newborns.

“Infants born early or with life-threatening conditions need instant access to specialized care and a gifted team of caregivers,” said Melissa Cate, R.N., M.N., MBA, system administrative director for Women’s, Infants and Children’s Services at Swedish Medical Center. “Swedish First Hill is honored to provide the highest level of neonatal services to families in this region.”

Multiple Sclerosis Center Summer BBQ presented by Young Adults with MS Support Group

September 03, 2014

On August 23 the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center hosted a summer barbeque in honor of the Young Adults with MS Support Group. With nearly 140 patients, family members, friends, and MS Center staff in attendance, the luncheon occupied the clinic’s lounge, wellness studio, and exterior terrace. Speeches were given by Dr. James Bowen, Medical Director and Neurologist at the MS Center as well as members of the Young Adults with MS Support Group. Patients and visitors had the opportunity to socialize and connect with others in the MS community while enjoying appetizers, burgers, hot dogs, and dessert.

 

KING 5 HealthLink profiles focused ultrasound research at Swedish

August 28, 2014

KING 5 TV’s HealthLink program recently aired a segment on a clinical trial being conducted at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute at its Cherry Hill hospital. The study is examining the use of a novel, noninvasive approach to treating brain disorders using focused ultrasound. The concept is appealing to clinicians, as it could provide patients with a less invasive treatment option.

The KING 5 story examines the technology’s application for the treatment of essential tremor, one of the most common movement disorders. Swedish Neuroscience Institute is also studying focused ultrasound for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and brain tumors.

Multiple Sclerosis Center August Pet of the Month

August 26, 2014

Meet Reggie - this two year old English Springer Spaniel loves visiting retirement homes and sporting hats and bow ties. Reggie may be the most dapper canine around as he enjoys showing off his attire and meeting new people. Found as a stray in Oregon, Reggie was rescued and placed in a shelter for ten days. Matted, disheveled, and smelly, Reggie waited but no one came to claim him. Soon after, English Springer Rescue America (ESRA) was called and he was adopted by his (now) best friend, Jackie Harrison. Jackie has trained Reggie to be her service dog while making him the best dressed dog in town. Reggie was Jackie's 14th foster dog through English Springer Rescue America.
 
Reggie in his patriotic attire at last year's 4th of July parade on Bainbridge Island Read more

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