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Why do some people continue to have difficulty hearing even with a hearing aid?

May 12, 2014
Why is one person a successful hearing aid user while another is not?  What factors contribute to such diverse outcomes?

Many rave about using amplification and report that acquiring hearing aids is a life changing event that opens up the world to a wide range of sounds and improves communication.  But some people report that they are reluctant to obtain amplification because they have known friends or a family member that obtained advanced hearing aids but continued to struggle hearing during group activities.  

Why is one person a successful hearing aid user while another is not?  What factors contribute to such diverse outcomes?

Naren Balasubramaniam New Swedish Chief Human Resources Officer

April 24, 2014

Swedish Health Services is proud to announce that Naren Balasubramaniam will serve as its new Chief Human Resources Officer. In his role with Swedish, Naren will have accountability for the Swedish HR function and will oversee the Swedish HR team and will also lead the change management and people engagement strategies at Swedish facilities. His first day was April 21.

Naren Balasubramaniam new Swedish chief human resources officer

April 24, 2014

Swedish Health Services is proud to announce that Naren Balasubramaniam will serve as its new Chief Human Resources Officer. In his role with Swedish, Naren will have accountability for the Swedish HR function and will oversee the Swedish HR team and will also lead the change management and people engagement strategies at Swedish facilities. His first day was April 21.

Swedish, Country Doctor Partnership Profiled by Seattle Times

April 21, 2014

Seattle Times health care reporter Carol Ostrom recently profiled the innovative partnership between Swedish/Cherry Hill hospital and Country Doctor Community Health Centers. The partnership created an after-hours clinic located adjacent to the Swedish Emergency Department that is designed to provide a convenient point of care for patients, as well as to reduce the number of unnecessary visits to the Swedish Cherry Hill ED.

Read the full story online in the Seattle Times.

Swedish, Country Doctor partnership profiled by Seattle Times

April 21, 2014

Seattle Times health care reporter Carol Ostrom recently profiled the innovative partnership between Swedish/Cherry Hill hospital and Country Doctor Community Health Centers. The partnership created an after-hours clinic located adjacent to the Swedish Emergency Department that is designed to provide a convenient point of care for patients, as well as to reduce the number of unnecessary visits to the Swedish Cherry Hill ED.

What to do for a sudden change in your hearing

February 17, 2014

Sudden hearing loss is a condition that warrants you seeking medical management immediately.  If you notice a drastic change in your hearing, don’t assume its wax or fluid in your ear. It could be wax or fluid but it also may be a sudden hearing loss; either way you will likely benefit from medical treatment.

Sudden changes in hearing can happen overnight or over a few days and can be accompanied by loud ringing in the ear (tinnitus), dizziness/vertigo and/or fullness or pressure in the same ear.  They typically will occur in one ear and in very rare cases will occur on both sides.

The National Institute of Deafness and Communication Disorders (NIDCD) reports the incidence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss at approximately 4,000 new cases a year.  Sensorineural is a term used to denote hearing loss that occurs at the cochlea, the organ for hearing.

There are many causes of sudden hearing loss but it is quite uncommon to know exactly what caused the change in hearing. The patient’s medical history may offer clues. Good air and blood flow are paramount to healthy cochlear function and a change in hearing can occur due to the deprivation of either of these influences or it can be related other problems such as a virus that attacks the ear.

What to do for a sudden change in your hearing

February 17, 2014

Sudden hearing loss is a condition that warrants you seeking medical management immediately.  If you notice a drastic change in your hearing, don’t assume its wax or fluid in your ear. It could be wax or fluid but it also may be a sudden hearing loss; either way you will likely benefit from medical treatment.

Sudden changes in hearing can happen overnight or over a few days and can be accompanied by loud ringing in the ear (tinnitus), dizziness/vertigo and/or fullness or pressure in the same ear.  They typically will occur in one ear and in very rare cases will occur on both sides.

The National Institute of Deafness and Communication Disorders (NIDCD) reports the incidence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss at approximately 4,000 new cases a year.  Sensorineural is a term used to denote hearing loss that occurs at the cochlea, the organ for hearing.

There are many causes of sudden hearing loss but it is quite uncommon to know exactly what caused the change in hearing. The patient’s medical history may offer clues. Good air and blood flow are paramount to healthy cochlear function and a change in hearing can occur due to the deprivation of either of these influences or it can be related other problems such as a virus that attacks the ear.

Its raining!

January 08, 2014

Why do some people play their music so loud?

January 06, 2014

Have you heard someone ask this question? Have you asked it yourself? It is a question I hear frequently from persons in my office. The answer is not simple nor is it the same for everyone. There is one important factor, though, that remains poorly understood.

A short anatomy lesson

Our inner ear, or cochlea, has thousands of cellular components called hair cells. These cells act as biological amplifiers when the sound arriving at our ear is soft. That is, they pump up and down at the same frequency as the sound entering our ear making it more intense. This allows us to hear very soft sounds.

These same cochlear cells which amplify soft sounds can also contract and dampen the loud sounds which enter our ear. This prevents the ear from being over driven and this, in turn, prevents distortion.

So what happens if these cells are gradually damaged so that they no longer work properly? The simple answer is that we have hearing loss. We are not able to hear soft sounds as well as we once did because these cells are not able to perform their amplification function. But paradoxically, we may also be more disturbed by loud sound. The hair cells are not able to damp, or attenuate, loud sounds.

Why do some people play their music so loud?

January 06, 2014

Have you heard someone ask this question? Have you asked it yourself? It is a question I hear frequently from persons in my office. The answer is not simple nor is it the same for everyone. There is one important factor, though, that remains poorly understood.

A short anatomy lesson

Our inner ear, or cochlea, has thousands of cellular components called hair cells. These cells act as biological amplifiers when the sound arriving at our ear is soft. That is, they pump up and down at the same frequency as the sound entering our ear making it more intense. This allows us to hear very soft sounds.

These same cochlear cells which amplify soft sounds can also contract and dampen the loud sounds which enter our ear. This prevents the ear from being over driven and this, in turn, prevents distortion.

So what happens if these cells are gradually damaged so that they no longer work properly? The simple answer is that we have hearing loss. We are not able to hear soft sounds as well as we once did because these cells are not able to perform their amplification function. But paradoxically, we may also be more disturbed by loud sound. The hair cells are not able to damp, or attenuate, loud sounds.

Viewing Page 2 of 6 | Showing Results 11 - 20 of 55