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Swedish/Issaquah to announce partnership with ISC Gunners

April 03, 2014

News Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts: Gwen Williams, ISC 561-512-9713
gwynne.williams@issaquahsoccerclub.org
Erin McCullough, Swedish 425-313-2336
erin.mccullough@swedish.org

ISSAQUAH - April 3, 2014- Swedish/Issaquah is delighted to announce a new partnership with Issaquah Soccer Club (ISC) Gunners, a not-for-profit youth soccer organization serving over 300 youth soccer teams and 3000 children on the Eastside.

When stress takes a toll on your heart

February 20, 2014

When you face danger, your body’s built-in alarm system triggers the production of adrenalin and cortisol. Adrenalin makes your heart beat faster and cortisol produces sugar to help you physically and mentally react. Your body returns to normal when the danger is over.

Unlike cavemen, barbarians and knights, we don’t face extreme danger very often. Unfortunately, every-day stress also triggers your alarm system.

Work. Commute. Kids. Relatives. Friends. Death of a loved one. Money. Everything in life can cause stress.

Stress takes a toll on your body — including your heart. Because stress can linger, your body continues to produce extra adrenalin and cortisol.

When your body’s alarm system doesn’t turn off, you may eat more, exercise less, lose sleep, argue more, forget things, get depressed, or smoke or drink more than usual. These things put an added burden on your heart and increase your risk of heart disease. Recent studies have shown that laughter and positive thinking promote heart health, while anger and job stress can increase the risk of heart attacks.

Here are some tips to protect your heart from stress:

Tips for keeping young athletes safe and healthy

February 03, 2014
We all know exercise is an important factor in maintaining an active and healthy life. However, over-exercising can lead to a rare, but serious complication known as rhabdomyolysis – a medical team that literally means ‘dissolution or destruction of skeletal muscle’. There has been a recent increase in rhabdomyolysis amongst teen athletes so it is important to recognize the warning signs and learn how to prevent them.

The classic triad of rhabdomyolysis is dark urine, muscle weakness or fatigue, and muscle pain. Although exercise can be the primary factor, other key contributing elements such as dehydration, genetic conditions (e.g. sickle cell), metabolic disorders, nutritional supplements, drug use, and heat stress can exacerbate muscle damage. Without appropriate medical evaluation and care, rhabdomyolysis can cause permanent damage to the kidneys and may even be life-threatening in severe cases. Here are some tips to help your young athlete remain active and healthy:
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How to treat PFS runner's knee

November 27, 2013

Patellofemoral pain constitutes a quarter of the injuries to the knee. Kneecap pain can be both debilitating and frustrating; prolonged pain can limit physical activity and cause those suffering from it to abandon their recreational and sporting activities.

Patellofemoral pain usually manifests as a gradual onset of pain around the edge or underneath the kneecap during physical activities. Common activities such as descending hills or stairs, squatting, running, or sitting for long periods of time can all aggravate the pain and cause soreness.

How your knee works

patellofemoral pain image from http://www.moveforwardpt.com/The knee joint is made up of three bones: the femur (thigh bone), the tibia (shin bone), and the patella (kneecap). The patellofemoral joint refers to the kneecap and the groove (trochlea) in the femur in which the patella sits. The four muscles of the quadriceps all attach to the patella. The patella is a sesamoid bone (the bone is embedded within the tendon) and it plays a crucial role in the function of the leg by lengthening the lever arm of the muscles and tendons of the quad to maximize power and function and by acting as a shield to protect the knee from direct trauma. The cartilage covering the kneecap within the knee joint acts as a shock absorber, protecting the underlying bone from stress.  With running and jumping, the knee (and its overlying cartilage) can experience forces up to 8 times bodyweight. The cartilage itself does not have a nerve supply, but the bone underneath has an extensive nerve supply and these nerves become painful when the cartilage is not functioning properly to pad and protect the bone.

Q13 Interview with Dr. Jennifer Jaucian, Issaquah OBGYN

October 07, 2013

Swedish’s Dr. Jennifer Jaucian, an OBGYN physician serving patients at the Issaquah hospital campus, spoke with Q13’s Tina Patel on Friday, Oct. 4 to talk about how much weight expecting mothers should gain during pregnancy.

The interview came after a new study shows that expecting mothers who gain more weight than is recommended have an increased risk of having overweight children.

Dr. Jaucian advised women to understand how much weight they should gain during pregnancy based on their body mass index, to work with their doctors to track their weight through each trimester and ideally to reach an ideal weight before becoming pregnant.

Watch Dr. Jaucian’s Q13 interview here.

Tips for reducing hot flashes for women with breast cancer

October 05, 2013

Hot flashes are the most common complaint from women going through menopause. And for women who are breast cancer patients, the problem is often more acute. Surgery, chemotherapy and estrogen blocking medications can bring on hot flashes or make them worse if you already have them. And for women who must discontinue hormone replacement therapy, the instant onset of hot flashes and night sweats can severely impact quality of life.

Fortunately, there are several strategies you can easily and safely employ to decrease the severity and frequency of hot flashes and night sweats. Everything I recommend here is non-estrogenic so while it is generally safe for breast cancer patients and survivors, you should always check with your oncologist before trying any new supplement.

First, a few notes on diet. I recently had a patient who stopped eating refined sugars for general health reasons, and her hot flashes nearly disappeared. Your mileage may vary on this one but there are c...

Swedish's Dr. Reisner Elected President of State Medical Association

October 03, 2013

Swedish Medical Center’s Dr. Dale Reisner, MD, has been elected the new president of the Washington State Medical Association. The WSMA represents physicians, residents, medical students, and physician-assistants throughout the state.

Dr. Reisner is medical director of Obstetrical Quality and Patient Safety at Swedish in Seattle and is a maternal fetal medicine specialist. She is one of the regional experts in the management of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, and also has extensive experience in the management of connective tissue disease and autoimmune disorders in pregnancy.

Swedish Health Services Names Anthony A. Armada Chief Executive Officer

October 02, 2013

SEATTLE, Oct. 2, 2013 – Swedish Health Services announced today that, after a national search, it has named Anthony (Tony) A. Armada as its new Chief Executive Officer, beginning Nov. 1, 2013.

Armada currently serves as President of Advocate Lutheran General Hospital, an academic and research hospital that operates the only Level I trauma center in the northwest Chicago region. The hospital is part of Advocate Health Care, the largest health provider in Illinois and one of the nation’s top health systems.

Prior to joining Advocate, Armada served as President and Chief Executive Officer of the Henry Ford Hospital and Health Network in Detroit, Mich. from 2004-2009. Armada also served as senior vice president and area manager for Kaiser Permanente’s Metropolitan Los Angeles Service Area in California from 2000-2004.

Enrollment in the Washington Healthplanfinder begins today

October 01, 2013

Swedish is highlighting the opening of Washington Healthplanfinder. Starting today, uninsured residents in King County can enroll in quality, affordable health plans simply by calling or visiting www.wahealthplanfinder.org. Coverage begins on January 1, 2014.

Swedish has a comprehensive team in place, including in-person assisters trained by the state, to help Swedish hospital or Emergency Department patients sign up for coverage through Washington Healthplanfinder and learn about their options. Swedish is also partnering with local community clinics to help assist new patients and manage their enrollment needs.

Minor & James Medical, a Swedish Health Partner, Welcomes Seattle Urological Associates

October 01, 2013

SEATTLE, Oct. 1, 2013 – Minor & James Medical, a Swedish Health Partner, announced today that Seattle Urological Associates is joining its medical group effective Oct. 1.

As an integrated practice of Minor & James, Seattle Urological Associates can now leverage many of the same resources and health practices that are available to Minor & James physicians and patients, including its electronic health records system, online access to health information and patient services through MyChart, imaging services and more.

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