Uma Pisharody
Uma Pisharody, MD, FAAP

Uma Pisharody, MD, FAAP

Uma Pisharody, MD, FAAP
Specialty

Pediatric Gastroenterology

Clinical Interests / Special Procedures Performed

Anorectal Disease, Anorectal Manometry, Bleeding Internal, Chronic Abdominal Pain, Colonoscopy, Constipation, Crohn's Disease, Diarrhea, Chronic, Fecal Incontinence & Constipation, Flexible Sigmoidoscopy, Food Allergies, Gallstone Dx, Gastroenterology, Gastro-Esophageal Junction, Gastro-Esophageal Reflux, Gastrointestinal, Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Gastroscopy, GI Motility Disorders, Growth Problems, Hepatitis, Hepatitis C, Hepatobiliary, Hepatology, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Intestinal Motility Disorders, Intestinal Pseudo Obstruction, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Liver, Liver Disease, Liver Dx, Nutrition, Obesity, Pancreatabiliary Systems, Pancreatic Dx, Pancreatitis, Parasitic Infections, Ped/Adol Gastroenterology, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Peg Tube Insertion, Polypectomy, Sclerosing Cholangitis, Swallowing Disorders, Ulcerative Colitis, Viral Hepatitis

  • Accepting Children: Yes
  • Accepting New Patients: Yes
  • Accepting Medicare: Yes
  • Accepting Medicaid/DSHS: Yes
Payment Methods Accepted:

Medicare, Medicaid/DSHS, Bill Insurance, VISA, Master Card, Cash, Check, American Express, Discover Card

Insurance Accepted:

Contact this office for accepted insurance plans.

Additional Information:

Dr. Pisharody was recognized in Seattle Metroplitan magazine’s annual Top Doctors and Nurse Practitioners feature. (2013, 2014)

News Release

Dr. Pisharody was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Magazine (2013)

Surveys were mailed to physicians in King, Pierce, Snohomish and Kitsap counties. The survey asked physicians to name the provider they would seek out or recommend to loved ones.

News Release

Philosophy of Care

Approach each patient and family with the sincere intent to listen carefully and empathetically. Strive to make diagnoses based on clinical judgement and experience, using diagnostic tests wisely, as a complementary adjunct. Tailor treatment approaches to meet each child's individual needs.

Personal Interests

Music, travel, reading, vegetarian cooking

Medical School

Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore

Residency

Jersey Shore University Medical Center

Fellowship(s)

Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans

Board Certifications

Pediatrics, Pediatric Gastroenterology

Languages:

English, Malayalam

Professional Associations:

North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, American Gastroenterological Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Crohns and Colitis Foundation

Additional Information:

Dr. Pisharody was recognized in Seattle Metroplitan magazine’s annual Top Doctors and Nurse Practitioners feature. (2013, 2014)

News Release

Dr. Pisharody was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Magazine (2013)

Surveys were mailed to physicians in King, Pierce, Snohomish and Kitsap counties. The survey asked physicians to name the provider they would seek out or recommend to loved ones.

News Release

Dr. Pisharody is one of the designated Principal Investigators for an international research study which collects data on children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. The name of the study is:  DEVELOPTM An Inflammatory Bowel DisEase Multicenter, ProspectiVELOng-term Registry of Pediatric Patients.

What you need to know about Enterovirus D68

Recently, there has been a lot of discussion in the media about a severe type of respiratory illness affecting many children, mainly in the Midwest.  The respiratory illness, caused by an infection with Enterovirus D68, is scary to parents, because it’s hard to differentiate whether their child is ill from this particular virus or just has one of the many other viruses that cause cold- and flu-like symptoms around this time of year.
 
Sometimes media reports leave families with more questions than answers, which is why Dr. Dianne Glover, one of Swedish’s pediatric infectious disease specialists, wanted to share this information with you:

  • Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an unusual form of an otherwise common group of viruses referred to as Enteroviruses.  These are hardy viruses that usually spread by the respiratory route, but can also spread by fecal-oral route.  It is even possible to become infected by touching a surface contaminated with these viruses.

  • EV-D68 causes a respiratory illness which can quickly progress from a child behaving like they have a simple runny nose and mild cough to then having serious difficulty breathing.  Children ....

Bellyaches in Kids (and the “Und Here” Syndrome)

Bellyaches, stomachaches, or belly pain in school-age children are a common occurrence.  At least half of the children that get referred to pediatric gastroenterologists like me come for treatment of their chronic, recurrent abdominal pain.  Parents often feel frustrated because despite multiple visits to physicians, even emergency rooms, they are left with more questions than answers all whilst their child continues to suffer.

A typical scenario is a child whose pain seems worst in the mornings after awakening and towards the evening, especially after dinner or before bedtime.  Often the child doesn’t want to eat breakfast and if forced, tells his parents he feels nauseated.   When asked where the pain is, the child most often points to the area around his belly button.

More often than not, depending on a few other factors, the diagnosis ends up being ...

Kids and lactose intolerance

Do you wonder if your child might have “lactose intolerance”?    Have you ever thought of removing dairy from your child’s diet?  If the answer to either of these questions is yes, here are a few things to remember when it comes to lactose intolerance in kids:

  • Lactose is broken down by lactase.

While lactose is the carbohydrate (sugar) found in milk, lactase is the enzyme that digests the sugar. This enzyme is found in the lining of the small intestine, breaks down lactose into simpler molecules that are easier to absorb.  When there isn’t enough lactase, the sugar isn’t properly absorbed, which leads to the symptoms of “intolerance”, which include gas, bloating, pain and diarrhea.

  • True lactose intolerance is rare in young children.

Although children as young as infants can “transiently” have less lactase in their digestive tracts (most often, this happens for a week or two after an infection), lactase production remains ...

Gluten intolerance or low FODMAPs?

Despite test results that show no evidence of their children having neither any detectable allergies to wheat nor any signs of celiac disease, many parents choose to have their children follow a gluten-free diet.  This is because of convincing stories of how gluten (a protein found in wheat and other grains) seems to cause their kids to have belly aches, nausea, bloating and a variety of other symptoms.  

For years, this was hard to explain without a scientific explanation.   Gastroenterologists like me had a hard time supporting families who wanted to follow gluten free diets, without a good “medical reason”.  Then, in 2011, researchers from Australia conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, rechallenge trial in nearly 3 dozen patients (none of whom had celiac disease or wheat allergy), all of whom described worsening symptoms when unknowingly ingesting small amounts of gluten.  The results of this study described a condition termed, “Non-celiac gluten intolerance”.    It was after reading this landmark study that many physicians, including myself, began to validate parents’ concerns about gluten being the culprit behind their children’s gastrointestinal (GI) problems.

But then in 2013, just as word of non-celiac gluten intolerance was gaining popularity amongst physicians like me, the exact same group of researchers from Australia published a follow-up study on a similar set of about 3 dozen patients.  The findings of this 2nd study showed that instead...

Does your child have a food allergy or food sensitivity?

“Every time my child eats, his belly hurts. I think he must have a food allergy. Can you help us?”

Countless times have I heard this from parents of children worried about foods being the cause of their child’s gastrointestinal (GI) complaints. Some families wonder whether their child should start a “gluten-free” or other type of dietary change. More often than not, families have already tried a few diets before meeting with me.

Parents considering these types of elimination diets need to be aware of a few key points:
The difference between “food allergy” and “food sensitivity”:

Public Comment Period on Food Label Changes Ending Soon

Time is running out if you want your opinion to be heard when it comes to the FDA’s proposed changes to the iconic food label that we’ve all come to rely on when buying packaged foods. 

This is a big deal.  For those of you who haven’t heard, highlighted below are the key proposed changes:

  • Require information about the amount of “added sugars”.  A review of this was discussed in Dr. Thekke Karumathil’s blog a few months ago.

  • Remove the “calories from fat” label

  • Update serving size requirements

  • Present “dual-column” labels to differentiate “per-serving” and “per-package” calorie and nutrition information

  • Only require the declaration of amounts of 4 nutrients (vit D, calcium, iron, and potassium).  No longer will nutrients like Vitamin A and C be required, although manufacturers may declare them voluntarily.

  • Refresh the format to emphasize calories, serving sizes, and percent daily value.

Here's what these changes would look like:

New Washington State Law to Help Children with Food Allergies

It is with great happiness that I update an earlier blog posted several months ago with the news that patients with food allergies now have a law that helps them afford their treatment.  On Friday March 28th, Governor Jay Inslee signed a law that makes Washington the most recent state in the country to set a mandate for medical coverage of elemental formulas in the treatment of Eosinophilic GI disorders (EGIDs).  EGIDs are a severe form of gastrointestinal inflammation that results from food allergy. 


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