Uma Pisharody
Uma Pisharody, MD, FAAP

Uma Pisharody, MD, FAAP

Uma Pisharody, MD, FAAP
Specialty

Pediatric Gastroenterology

Clinical Interests / Special Procedures Performed

Anorectal Disease, Celiac Sprue Disease, Chronic Abdominal Pain, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Conditions, Constipation, Crohn's Disease, Diarrhea, Chronic, Encopresis, Endoscopy, Esophogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), Fecal Incontinence & Constipation, Gastroenterology, Gastro-Esophageal Reflux, Gastrointestinal, Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Gastroscopy, Growth Problems, Hepatitis, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, Hepatobiliary, Hepatology, Infant Care, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Liver, Liver Disease, Liver Dx, Pancreatitis, Parasitic Infections, Ped/Adol Gastroenterology, Pediatric Allergy, Pediatric Gastroenterology, Rectal Prolapse, Sigmoidoscopy, Swallowing Disorders, Ulcerative Colitis

  • Accepting Children: Yes
  • Accepting New Patients: Yes
  • Accepting Medicare: Yes
  • Accepting Medicaid/DSHS: Yes
Payment Methods Accepted:

Medicare, Medicaid/DSHS, Bill Insurance, VISA, Master Card, Cash, Check, American Express, Discover Card

Insurance Accepted:

Contact this office for accepted insurance plans.

Additional Information:

Dr. Pisharody was recognized in Seattle Metroplitan magazine’s annual Top Doctors and Nurse Practitioners feature. (2013, 2014)

News Release

Dr. Pisharody was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Magazine (2013)

Surveys were mailed to physicians in King, Pierce, Snohomish and Kitsap counties. The survey asked physicians to name the provider they would seek out or recommend to loved ones.

News Release

Philosophy of Care

Approach each patient and family with the sincere intent to listen carefully and empathetically. Strive to make diagnoses based on clinical judgement and experience, using diagnostic tests wisely, as a complementary adjunct. Tailor treatment approaches to meet each child's individual needs.

Personal Interests

Music, travel, reading, vegetarian cooking

Medical School

Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore

Residency

Jersey Shore University Medical Center

Fellowship(s)

Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans

Board Certifications

Pediatrics, Pediatric Gastroenterology

Languages:

English, Malayalam

Professional Associations:

North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, American Gastroenterological Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Crohns and Colitis Foundation

Additional Information:

Dr. Pisharody was recognized in Seattle Metroplitan magazine’s annual Top Doctors and Nurse Practitioners feature. (2013, 2014)

News Release

Dr. Pisharody was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Magazine (2013)

Surveys were mailed to physicians in King, Pierce, Snohomish and Kitsap counties. The survey asked physicians to name the provider they would seek out or recommend to loved ones.

News Release

Dr. Pisharody is one of the designated Principal Investigators (PI) for an international research study which collects data on children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. The name of the study is:  DEVELOPTM An Inflammatory Bowel DisEase Multicenter, ProspectiVELOng-term Registry of Pediatric Patients.

She is also one of the PIs for "A Long-Term Non-Interventional Registry to Assess Safety and Effectiveness of Humira (Adalimumab) in Pediatric Patients wtih Moderately to Severely Active Crohn's Disease (CD)"

The “Leaky Gut” Hypothesis

Have you heard of the term “leaky gut”? It’s used to describe a (scientifically unproven) theory, which proposes that the lining of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract could be abnormally permeable to dietary and other environmental substances, which then “leak” into the blood stream to trigger inflammation. Sometimes, the “leaky gut” theory is put forth as the cause of a variety of poorly understood diseases, ranging from autism to autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis.

As a gastroenterologist, trained with the knowledge of how the internal mechanics of the gut lining are designed to make it an effective barrier, I have always found it hard to accept this hypothesis. I wanted to share the findings of a recent publication showing that in a group of children known to have food allergies and gut inflammation, their GI tract was no more “leaky”, compared to the intestinal tracts of healthy children.

Tips for parents dealing with toddler’s diarrhea

Toddlerhood is a time when children are going through a lot of changes.  Children enter pre-school, toilet-training begins, diets change, and sometimes stooling patterns become different as well.  The latter issue often leads to parental worry.   One of the most common changes that parents of toddlers bring up during visits with me is that their toddler’s stools seem very loose or watery (“diarrhea”).  More often than not, the diagnosis ends up being “toddler’s diarrhea”, a harmless type of diarrhea that generally starts after a child is weaned.  (Other names for this condition include “functional diarrhea of childhood” or “chronic non-specific diarrhea of childhood”.)

Toddler’s diarrhea occurs due to a relative immaturity of the intestinal tract of young children.  Relatively speaking, sugars and some fluid get poorly absorbed.  The stools often contain undigested food particles (carrots and corn being the most commonly noticed).  The key differentiating factor that sets toddler’s diarrhea apart from other causes of diarrhea at this age is that except for loose stools, there are no other symptoms.  There is no malabsorption of nutrients, so children with toddler’s diarrhea have normal growth and weight gain.  Otherwise, they are perfectly healthy.  There won’t be anything abnormal found during their physical exam.  Tests are not generally needed, because those, too, will be normal.

Even though toddler’s diarrhea resolves on its own, I often tell families to follow the “4 Fs” as a guide to treatment:

Pediatric Experts Voice Concern Over Feeding Children Rice

A recent consensus statement written by international pediatric nutrition experts has recommended that infants and young children avoid rice-based drinks.  This is due to the fact that some types of rice contain large concentrations of inorganic arsenic, a first-level carcinogen.  There is no safe level of intake, because any exposure is risky.  The longer the exposure to inorganic arsenic, the more toxic its effects.

The newly published report reminds us that rice and derived products such as starch, flour and syrup are used to fortify different foods, including drinks, purees, and snacks.  These are foods often fed to infants and young children.  Since most of the inorganic arsenic in rice is concentrated in the outer bran layers, the report also highlights that potentially, the most harmful type of exposure is that which comes from products manufactured from brown rice.  

To reduce the harmful effects from arsenic exposure in rice-based foods, experts recommend the following:

FDA Questions Safety of Constipation Medication

On Monday the New York Times published an article about the FDA’s plan to research the safety of a very commonly prescribed medication, polyethylene glycol 3350 or PEG 3350 (most commonly known under the brand name, MiraLAX®).  As a pediatric gastroenterologist who often recommends this medication, I wanted to share my personal thoughts after reading the article.

First of all, although the news was certainly a surprise to me, it was a pleasant one. I was ...

A year of personal medicine as a physician

I’m fortunate enough to have lived most of my life with hardly a worry in the world when it came to personal health issues. However, this year changed my outlook. Firmly into the fourth decade of my life, it became necessary to schedule some basic preventative health care screens for the first time. This then led me down to what seemed like a never-ending path of scheduling and completing test after test, followed by even more appointments. As the year progressed, I also became involved in a serious health care issue affecting a very close family member which led to learning how to navigate the maze of international health care!

As 2014 finally rolls to an end, I reflect on some valuable lessons learned, having experienced medicine from the perspective of a consumer rather than a provider.

No “window of opportunity” for celiac disease prevention

As a pediatric gastroenterologist, I’m often asked whether there is any way to prevent a child from developing celiac disease. Based on what I knew regarding how food allergies develop, I used to counsel families that there might be a “window of opportunity”, between four and six months, when it’s possible to introduce grains and other gluten-containing foods that could potentially “teach” the immune system to tolerate gluten and thus lower the risk of developing celiac disease.

However, my “window theory” recently got thrown out the window when the results of two important scientific studies were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

What you need to know about Enterovirus D68

Recently, there has been a lot of discussion in the media about a severe type of respiratory illness affecting many children, mainly in the Midwest.  The respiratory illness, caused by an infection with Enterovirus D68, is scary to parents, because it’s hard to differentiate whether their child is ill from this particular virus or just has one of the many other viruses that cause cold- and flu-like symptoms around this time of year.
 
Sometimes media reports leave families with more questions than answers, which is why Dr. Dianne Glover, one of Swedish’s pediatric infectious disease specialists, wanted to share this information with you:

  • Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an unusual form of an otherwise common group of viruses referred to as Enteroviruses.  These are hardy viruses that usually spread by the respiratory route, but can also spread by fecal-oral route.  It is even possible to become infected by touching a surface contaminated with these viruses.

  • EV-D68 causes a respiratory illness which can quickly progress from a child behaving like they have a simple runny nose and mild cough to then having serious difficulty breathing.  Children ....

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