Teresa Patani
Teresa Marie Patani, M.D.

Teresa Marie Patani, M.D.

Teresa Marie Patani, M.D.
Specialty

Obstetrics and Gynecology

Clinical Interests / Special Procedures Performed

Abnormal Pap Smears, Abnormal Uterine Bleeding, Adolescent Gynecology, Colposcopy, Gynecology, Obstetrics

  • Accepting Children: No
  • Accepting New Patients: Yes
  • Accepting Medicare: Unknown
  • Accepting Medicaid/DSHS: Unknown
Insurance Accepted:

Contact this office for accepted insurance plans.

Medical School

Medical College of Wisconsin

Residency

Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rush University Medical Center

Board Certifications

American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology

Eating for Two? Nutrition in Pregnancy

You may have many questions when you find out that you are pregnant, but some of the most common concerns revolve around nutrition and food safety. These are some basic guidelines from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists to get you started. As always, your situation may be different and so always discuss specifics with your provider.

How much weight should I gain?

This depends on your pre-pregnancy BMI (body mass index - a calculation from your height and weight). In general, however, if your pre-pregnancy weight is normal you should gain between 25 to 35 pounds. Most women stay within this goal with an increase of only 300 extra calories a day (equal to about 2 tablespoons of peanut butter and one slice of whole wheat bread). If you are underweight, however, you may need to gain more weight, and if you are overweight, less. Your doctor can help you to come up with a specific weight goal.

What foods can't I eat?

Alcohol, of course, is not recommended in pregnancy, but there are other restrictions. Other foods can put you at risk for listeriosis, a bacterial infection that causes miscarriage and stillbirth. Unpasteurized milk and cheese can put you at risk, as can raw or undercooked shellfish, meat, or poultry. Deli meats and hotdogs are okay if they are heated until they are steaming hot.

What about fish?

That depends on the fish! Certain large fish may contain too much mercury to be safely eaten in pregnancy. High levels of mercury exposure in pregnancy may lead to nervous system damage in the unborn child. If you are pregnant you should avoid eating Shark, Tilefish, Swordfish, and King Mackerel and limit your intake of albacore tuna to 6 ounces a week.

You may eat fish and shellfish that are lower in mercury, but no more than 12 ounces a week. If you want to eat fish caught by family or friends from local waterways check for local advisories first, and do not eat more than 6 ounces.

Do I need to take extra vitamins or supplements?

It is important to take ...

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Offices

Minor and James Medical
Nordstrom Tower
1229 Madison St., Suite 1500
Seattle, WA 98104
Phone: 206-292-2200

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