Sonal Avasare
Sonal S. Avasare, M.D.

Sonal S. Avasare, M.D.

Sonal S. Avasare, M.D.
Specialty

Pediatric Nephrology

  • Accepting Children: Yes
  • Accepting New Patients: Yes
  • Accepting Medicare: Yes
  • Accepting Medicaid/DSHS: Yes
Insurance Accepted:

Contact this office for accepted insurance plans.

Philosophy of Care

Dr. Avasare's treatment approach is to listen to each child and family and understand what their individual needs are. She believes it is important to make diagnoses based on clinical judgement and experience, using diagnostic tests when necessary and then design treatment plans tailored to each child's needs.

Personal Interests

Dr. Avasare's hobbies include tennis, cooking and traveling.

Medical School

University of Washington

Residency

UCLA Tri-Campus Pediatric Residency Program

Fellowship(s)

UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital

Board Certifications

American Board of Pediatrics

Professional Associations:

American Society of Nephrology, American Society of Pediatric Nephrology

Tips for keeping young athletes safe and healthy

We all know exercise is an important factor in maintaining an active and healthy life. However, over-exercising can lead to a rare, but serious complication known as rhabdomyolysis – a medical team that literally means ‘dissolution or destruction of skeletal muscle’. There has been a recent increase in rhabdomyolysis amongst teen athletes so it is important to recognize the warning signs and learn how to prevent them.

The classic triad of rhabdomyolysis is dark urine, muscle weakness or fatigue, and muscle pain. Although exercise can be the primary factor, other key contributing elements such as dehydration, genetic conditions (e.g. sickle cell), metabolic disorders, nutritional supplements, drug use, and heat stress can exacerbate muscle damage. Without appropriate medical evaluation and care, rhabdomyolysis can cause permanent damage to the kidneys and may even be life-threatening in severe cases. Here are some tips to help your young athlete remain active and healthy:

  1. Maintain adequate hydration – preferably with plain water.  Sports and energy drinks may often contain caffeine and excessive amounts of sugar which can cause dehydration.  On average, children that are 6-10 years old should have about 1L of fluid a day, children 10-14 years old should have 1.5L/day and teens over 14 years should have at least 2L of fluid a day. It is important to increase fluids with increased activity due to the additional fluid losses that occur.
  2. Eliminate protein supplements. A recent study by the American Academy of Pediatrics found ...
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Offices

Pediatric Specialty Care/Seattle
1101 Madison
First Hill Campus, Madison Tower, Suites 800
Seattle, WA 98104
Phone: 206-215-2700
Fax: 206-215-2702
8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Map & Directions

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Affiliations

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