Biography & Education

Biography
Offering my patients the guidance and support to effectively manage their condition and lead a fuller life
Education Background
Medical School: University of Alabama School of Medicine
Residency: Cornell - New York Presbyterian Hospital
Fellowship: Mount Sinai Hospital, New York
Languages
  • English
  • Spanish
  • Croatian
Professional Associations
Diplomate, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology; Member, American Academy of Neurology
Personal Interests
foreign languages, cultures and cuisine; tango; nature

Care Locations

1600 East Jefferson
A Level
Seattle, WA 98122
Fax 206-320-2560
Accepting Medicaid

Publications

Research

Peer-reviewed original contributions:
1) Repovic P, Lublin F (2010) Treatment of multiple sclerosis exacerbations. Neurol Clinics North America, in press.
2) Repovic P, Fears C, Gladson CL, Benveniste EN (2003) Oncostatin-M induction of vascular endothelial growth factor expression in astroglioma cells. Oncogene 22(50), 8117-24.
3) Repovic P, Mi K, Benveniste EN (2003) Oncostatin M enhances the expression of prostaglandin E2 and cyclooxygenase-2 in astrocytes: synergy with interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and bacterial LPS. Glia 42(4), 433-46.
4) Repovic P, Benveniste EN (2002) Prostaglandin E2 is a novel inducer of Oncostatin M expression in macrophages and microglia. J Neurosci 22(13), 5334-43.
5) Van Wagoner NJ, Choi C, Repovic P, Benveniste EN (2000) Oncostatin M regulation of interleukin-6 expression in astrocytes: biphasic regulation involving the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK1/2 and p38. J Neurochem 75(2), 563-75.
6) Van Wagoner NJ, Oh JW, Repovic P, Benveniste EN (1999) IL-6 production by astrocytes:autocrine regulation by IL-6 and soluble IL-6 receptor. J Neurosci 19(13), 5236-44.
7) Waddel TG, Repovic P, Melendez-Hevia E, Heinrich R, Montero F (1997) Optimisation of glycolysis: a new look at the efficiency of energy coupling; Biochem Educ 25(4), 204-205.


Books and Chapters:
• Repovic P. Molecular Neurobiology and Neurotrauma chapters in the 2006 Psychiatry In-Review Study Guide, ed. S. J. Ferrando, ETAS. New York, 2006

Blog

Biotin for Progressive MS: Surprise from the American Academy of Neurology Meeting

June 06, 2015

Undoubtedly the most talked-about study presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology in Washington, DC, was the study of high-dose biotin for progressive MS (PPMS or SPMS). The authors conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study across 16 MS centers in France, comparing placebo with MD1003, a proprietary purified high dose biotin. 154 patients participated in this 12-month study. The primary endpoint of the study was the proportion of patients who improved at 9 months (compared to the entry at the study), with sustained improvement at 12 months. 12.6% of patients in the MD1003 arm improved, compared to 0% in the placebo arm. The treated group, as a whole, had improved disability scores compared to placebo group. MD1003 was well-tolerated.

HPV vaccination and risk of MS

February 25, 2015
As long as the cause of multiple sclerosis (MS) remains unknown, it will be tempting – for patients and doctors alike – to search for an explanation among events that occurred before the diagnosis. This approach, known from antiquity as post hoc, ergo propter hoc (after the fact, therefore because of the fact), though sometimes successful, can also be misleading. History of science in general, and multiple sclerosis in particular, is rife with such fallacies. It is important to remember then, that this approach is best thought of as “brainstorming”, generating potential leads, but (almost) never the definitive proof.

Gilenya fails in primary progressive multiple sclerosis trial

December 29, 2014
We recently found out that Gilenya (fingolimod), an oral treatment for relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS), did not slow down disability progression in a phase III trial among primary progressive MS (PPMS) patients. The trial, called INFORMS, was the largest to date in PPMS, involving 970 patients in North America, Europe, and Australia. Patients were assigned to placebo or Gilenya for 3 years, and the primary outcome was a composite of walking, arm function and overall disability measures. Unfortunately, the progression rates in Gilenya and placebo groups were not statistically different. A full report of the trial will be presented at one of the upcoming neurology meetings, possibly in April 2015.

A (Slightly) New Medication for Multiple Sclerosis Comes Out in November

October 21, 2014
Interferons have been used for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) since 1993. The existing line-up of interferons for MS (Avonex, Betaseron, Extavia and Rebif) will soon be joined by Plegridy, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in August 2014. Plegridy will become commercially available in November 2014.

Plegridy is a pegylated form of interferon beta. Pegylation is a process, used by several other non-MS medications, whereby a long string of polyethylene glycol molecules is attached to the interferon beta molecule, to extend its half-life by reducing clearance via kidneys or other elimination pathways in the body. This modification allows less frequent dosing of Plegridy – once every two weeks – although it is still administered as an injection under the skin.

In the ADVANCE trial, Plegridy was ..

Join the Swedish MS Center for Walk MS

March 22, 2014

The Swedish MS Center is proud to participate in the annual Multiple Sclerosis Walk organized by the National MS Society. The annual MS Walk raises awareness of multiple sclerosis in our community and also raises funds for new cutting-edge research and life changing programs and services of the National MS Society Greater Northwest Chapter. The NMSS Greater NW Chapter serves more than 15,000 people with MS living in Alaska, Montana and Central and Western Washington.
 
The Swedish MS Center has formed a Walk MS team to join in the fundraising efforts. Anyone is welcome to join the team-patients, friends, family or concerned community members. By joining, you can make a powerful statement and real difference for people living with multiple sclerosis. The money raised by the team will give hope to thousands of people living with MS in the Northwest. Join or donate to the team now!
 

FDA declines approval of Lemtrada for the treatment of MS

March 21, 2014
On December 30, 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration declined to approve the use of alemtuzumab (Lemtrada) for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. The FDA stated that the manufacturer of Lemtrada “has not submitted evidence from adequate and well-controlled studies that demonstrate the benefits of Lemtrada outweigh its serious adverse effects.” This was a surprising decision to some, as only a month earlier an advisory panel of experts convened by the FDA, while raising some objections, voted to have this medicine approved. The manufacturer of Lemtrada, Genzyme, a Sanofi company, intends to appeal this decision.
 
In response, a number of MS organizations and experts have voiced their concerns that with this step, MS patients are left without a potential choice in therapy. This decision is particularly difficult for ...

2013 World Atlas of MS published

November 22, 2013

The 2013 World Atlas of MS has been published by MS International Foundation and is available here. The key findings are:

  1. The estimated number of people with MS has increased from 2.1 million in 2008 to 2.3 million in 2013
  2. The 2:1 ratio of women to men with MS has not changed significantly since 2008
  3. Substantial global inequalities remain in terms of access to treatment and medical care

Is someone with multiple sclerosis an MSer?

September 05, 2013

A survey from the United Kingdom published in the Journal of MS and Related Disorders polled 396 people with multiple sclerosis (MS) about how they would like to be referred to in conversation. The winning term ("MSer") was supported by 43% of the respondents, while "person with MS" received 34% votes. When a United States-based blog reported on the story, 2 out of 3 respondents disagreed.

What do you think? Comment below with your preference and why.

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(Ed. note: You can comment anonymously - feel free to use your initials if you are more comfortable sharing that way.)

MS Research Roundup: Cannabinoids and new trials for progressive MS

August 10, 2013

A couple recent announcements may be of interest to people living with multiple sclerosis. Read the articles below and click through the links for more information about the individual studies.

Trial shows no benefit of cannabinoid in slowing multiple sclerosis progression

A UK trial of dronabinol (delta-9-THC) in 498 patients did not slow the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS) compared to placebo. Critics will point out that this is only one of many cannabinoids found in marijuana; and that the placebo arm did better than expected (thus limiting the ability to detect the effects of the drug). Nonetheless, the result is the strongest argument yet against the neuroprotective effects of THC in MS population.

New trials in progressive MS are coming

Later this year, two trials will ...

MS Research Update: New MS tests could improve predictions of cognitive impairment

May 14, 2013

Cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis (MS) is a recognized, but poorly understood phenomenon. Detection of cognitive dysfunction is hampered by the fact that cognitive testing is often long, sometimes costly and at times frustrating for patients. A brief, acceptable screening tool for cognitive dysfunction in MS is lacking.

A new study shows potential progress toward such a tool. Authors of a paper published in the Multiple Sclerosis Journal describe a 10-minute battery of computerized tests that was able to identify with fairly good sensitivity those patients who experienced cognitive impairment. This study, like several other similar efforts, awaits verification before they are more broadly accepted. It is hoped that such tools will come at no or minimal cost to the patients.

Identifying cognitive dysfunction early may be importan...

Swedish Contributes to New Treatment Option for Multiple Sclerosis

September 18, 2012

 On September 12, 2012, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved teriflunomide for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Teriflunomide (AUBAGIO) is a once-daily pill for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS. Led by Dr. Lily Jung Henson, the Swedish Neuroscience Institute was among several clinical sites that tested the drug. Results of the research showed that teriflunomide can lessen MS disease activity. Specifically, it behaves similarly to injectable therapies by slowing MS relapse frequency, the rate of disability and MRI activity.

The safety profile, however, is more challenging than ....

Expecting the Best in Pregnancy and Multiple Sclerosis

May 16, 2011

Considering that multiple sclerosis (MS) affects primarily women of childbearing age, it comes as no surprise that for many patients MS and pregnancy often occur together. The issues to consider when discussing pregnancy and MS include:

  • How pregnancy affects MS
  • How MS affects pregnancy
  • How MS treatment should be managed throughout pregnancy

The Pregnancy in MS (PRIMS) study of 254 patients revealed that pregnancy is generally protective against MS relapses, in particular during the third trimester. In contrast, the same study found a rebound of relapses during three months post delivery, with 30 percent of women experiencing a relapse within three months after delivery. Several strategies have been proposed to avert the risk of postpartum relapse, including the use of pro...

Specialties

Clinical Interests
  • Autoimmune Disorders
  • Clinical Trials
  • Double Vision
  • Immunology
  • Limb Numbness
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Multiple Sclerosis Clinics at SNI
  • Multiple Sclerosis Program
  • Neuroimmunology
  • Swedish Neuroscience Institute
  • The Multiple Sclerosis Specialists at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute

Reviews

Patient Ratings and Comments
About Our Survey

The Patient Rating score is based on responses given during the CAHPS Patient Experience Survey. Responses are measured on a 10-point scale, with 10 being the best score. These scores are then translated to a 5-point scale in order to display results in a 5-star rating. Comments are also gathered from the same survey and displayed in their entirety with the exception of any language that may be considered slander, libel or contain private health information, which will be removed prior to publishing the comments.

4.6 out of 5 (65 Ratings, 5 Comments)

20

01/20/2015
he was not listening to me but just using my chart notes. I need someone that would actually listen to me.
Swedish Patient
100

11/30/2014
I was referred to Dr. Repovic by another neurologist. And Swedish is highly praised and recommended by friends who have received received their care. I hope I never have to recommend anyone for my rare condition, but I continue to recommend the high level of care I have received.
Swedish Patient
100

11/30/2014
I have recommended my doctor to a friend and they thought he was very good.
Swedish Patient
70

10/07/2014
Could improve by ensuring my previous charts are read so knows my full history.
Swedish Patient
100

09/08/2014
I do wish he didn't poo-pah healthy eating/allergy concerns my husband has.
Swedish Patient