Peiqing Qian
Peiqing Qian, M.D.

Peiqing Qian, M.D.

Peiqing Qian, M.D.
Specialty

Multiple Sclerosis

Clinical Interests / Special Procedures Performed

Multiple Sclerosis, Multiple Sclerosis Rehabilitation, Neuroimmunology, Neuroradiology

  • Accepting Children: Yes
  • Accepting New Patients: Yes
  • Accepting Medicare: Yes
  • Accepting Medicaid/DSHS: Yes
Insurance Accepted:

Contact this office for accepted insurance plans.

Philosophy of Care

To provide her patients guidance and support to effectively manage their conditions with better quality of life

Personal Interests

Music, culture, cooking and gardening

Medical School

Shanghai Second Medical University

Residency

Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO

Fellowship(s)

Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO

Board Certifications

American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

Languages:

English, Chinese

Professional Associations:

American Academy of Neurology

Awards:

Wexler Prize and Leonard Prize for Research in MS 2011 Foundation of CMSC scholarship 2012

Statin Benefits Secondary Progressive MS

No treatments can currently abate the advanced stage of the disease, known as secondary progressive MS, which gradually causes patients to become more disabled. Statins are postulated to have immunomodulatory effects that appear to be independent of their effect on cholesterol. A benefit has been suggested in early multiple sclerosis (MS) based on reduction of magnetic resonance imaging brain lesions.  However, following trials have had inconsistent results.

In this multicenter, double-blind study, investigators randomized 140 participants with secondary progressive (SP) MS to 80 mg of simvastatin or placebo daily for 2 years. Participants were 18 to 65 years old, had active progression over the preceding 2 years, and had difficulties ambulating but were not wheelchair bound.  Whole brain atrophy was 43% slower annually in simvastatin recipients than in placebo recipients. The simvastatin group also had small clinical improvements over placebo on the disability scale and a patient-reported MS impact scale at 24 months.
 
These findings show that simvastatin reduced ...

FDA approves 40 mg/mL Copaxone for 3 times a week

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the three-times-a-week COPAXONE® 40mg/mL, a new dose of COPAXONE® on Jan 28, 2014.  This new formulation will allow for a less frequent dosing regimen administered by injection for patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). In addition to the newly approved dose, daily COPAXONE® 20 mg/mL will continue to be available.

The FDA approval is based on data from ...

Testosterone is associated with worse disease severity in men with early relapsing onset multiple sclerosis

MS and many other autoimmune diseases are less common in men than in women. This is especially true during reproductive years. Sex hormones, including testosterone and estrogen, may be responsible for the difference. It is thought that men with multiple sclerosis may have lower testosterone levels than healthy controls.

Dr. Bove and his group assessed the prevalence and clinical associations of hypogonadism in men with recent onset relapsing multiple sclerosis.  Male subjects from the Comprehensive Longitudinal Investigations of MS at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (CLIMB) cohort were included. Hormonal measures included testosterone, the testosterone: estradiol ratio, leutinizing hormone (LH), and free testosterone. Clinical outcomes were collected every 6 months for Expanded Disease Severity Scale (EDSS), and annually for Symbol Digit Modalities test (SDMT).

The analysis included 96 men with a mean age of 40 years, disease duration of 4.6 years; 71% subjects were untreated at baseline. Of these men, 39% were ...

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Offices

Multiple Sclerosis Center
1600 East Jefferson
A Level
Seattle, WA 98122
Phone: 206-320-2200
Fax: 206-320-2560

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