Patricia Dawson
Patricia L. Dawson, M.D., PhD

Patricia L. Dawson, M.D., PhD

Patricia L. Dawson, M.D., PhD
Specialty

Breast Surgery, Breast-Cancer Surgery

Clinical Interests / Special Procedures Performed

Balloon Catheter Based Breast Brachytherapy, Biopsy, Blood Management Techniques, Bloodless Breast Surgery, Breast Aspiration, Breast Biopsy, Breast Cancer, Breast Disorders, Breast Surgery, Cancer Institute, Cancer Surgery, Fine Needle Aspiration, Limited to Breast Surgery, Mammosite, Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy

  • Accepting Children: No
  • Accepting New Patients: Yes
  • Accepting Medicare: Yes
  • Accepting Medicaid/DSHS: Yes
Payment Methods Accepted:

Medicare, Medicaid/DSHS, Bill Insurance, VISA, Master Card, Cash, Check, American Express, Discover Card, Money Order, Sliding Fee Scale

Insurance Accepted:

Contact this office for accepted insurance plans.

Additional Information:

Internship: University of Medicine and Dentistry, NJ
Residency: University of Medicine and Dentistry, NJ
                     Virginia Mason Medical Center
PhD - Human and Organizational Systems - The Fielding Graduate Institute 1998


 

Dr. Dawson was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Magazine (2013).

Surveys were mailed to physicians in King, Pierce, Snohomish and Kitsap counties. The survey asked physicians to name the provider they would seek out or recommend to loved ones.

News Release

Philosophy of Care

I believe in the importance of a women-centered interdisciplinary team in the treatment of women with breast cancer and benign breast disorders. The patient is an essential member of the team, and we work together with her to evaluate her condition, provide her with information about diagnostic and treatment options, address her questions and concerns, and provide appropriate, compassionate care.

Personal Interests

Writing, reading, walking, travel.

Medical School

New Jersey Medical School, NJ; University of Medicine and Dentistry, NJ

Residency

New Jersey Medical School, NJ; Virginia Mason Medical Center, WA

Board Certifications

American Board of Surgery - General Surgery

Professional Associations:

American College of Surgeons, Association of Women Surgeons, American Society of Breast Surgeons, American Society of Breast Disease

Additional Information:

Internship: University of Medicine and Dentistry, NJ
Residency: University of Medicine and Dentistry, NJ
                     Virginia Mason Medical Center
PhD - Human and Organizational Systems - The Fielding Graduate Institute 1998


 

Dr. Dawson was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Magazine (2013).

Surveys were mailed to physicians in King, Pierce, Snohomish and Kitsap counties. The survey asked physicians to name the provider they would seek out or recommend to loved ones.

News Release

Breast Cancer Screening Recommendations Revisited

Are you confused about breast cancer screening recommendations? If you are, you are not alone.

Multiple organizations have come out with conflicting studies, data, and recommendations. Those advocating for reduced screening argue that screening does not improve the death rate from breast cancer; that women who have biopsies that are found to be benign suffer significant psychological harm; and that cancers are found that would never cause death.

Significant flaws have been found in these arguments by physicians who have committed their careers to understanding and treating breast cancer. There are multiple problems with the scientific methodology, assumptions, endpoints and analyses used in these critiques of mammogram screening recommendations. One problem is that medical science currently does not have the ability to distinguish between lethal cancers and those that will not cause death. Based on rigorous scientific data, we do know that the best way to improve survival from breast cancer is to detect it before it becomes clinically obvious and to treat it early.

None of the major oncology organizations support the guidelines calling for reduced screening. A letter to the New England Journal of Medicine ....

Deciding on surgical treatment for breast cancer

A recent article in the Seattle Times references the 2012 Dartmouth Atlas Report: Improving Patient Decision-Making in Health Care. Unfortunately their take home line, "A new report that found wide geographical variation in the use of elective surgical procedures in Pacific states reflects the preferences of physicians – not what patients want or need, the authors say,” oversimplifies a complicated situation.

On my reading of the report, it stresses the values that an individual woman brings to the decision:

“Different women will prefer one option or the other, depending upon how much they value preserving their breast, their willingness to undergo radiation or more invasive surgery, and the level of uncertainty they are willing to live with in terms of their cancer recurring.”

As a breast surgeon who has practiced in Seattle for almost 40 years, I don’t believe that “the preferences of physicians” are the driving factor. I have a few observations to make.

It is clear that wide variations in treatment of early stage breast cancer can be seen across the USA, as the Dartmouth-Atlas data confirms. Some factors that influence this are physician related – for example, what % of their surgical practice involves treating women with breast cancer. Specialists in breast cancer or general surgeons who treat large numbers of women with breast cancer are motivated to be current in their practice patterns and to make sure that their patients are making considered decisions. The utilization of breast MRI has been shown to influence the mastectomy rates and there is regional variation in the use of that study. Distance to a radiation oncology treatment center is a factor for some women as are potential differences in out of pocket costs between mastectomy and breast conservation.

All of the local breast surgeons that I know strongly value shared decision making with their patients. We all work hard to present treatment options fairly and as neutrally as possible. If we have a patient that we think is choosing mastectomy over breast conservation out of fear – for example, fear of radiation therapy – we will encourage her to consult with a radiation oncology specialist prior to making a final decision. We believe that one of our roles is to help our patients make informed decisions. If there are clear medical reasons why one treatment is preferred, we will state that but otherwise encourage the patient to make the best decision for herself.

For example...

Health Disparities and Breast Cancer

Just as all breast cancers are not alike, the impact of breast cancer is not the same for all women. African American women are less likely to get breast cancer than Caucasian women, but they are about 40% more likely to die of it when they do get it. African American women are also more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer at a younger age than Caucasian women and to have more advanced cancers at diagnosis.

There appear to be multiple reasons for these disparities - including cultural beliefs / misperceptions about screening and cancer; lack of access to screening; inequities in healthcare delivery and treatment; concerns about being exposed to racism by healthcare institutions; and biological differences in the cancers themselves.

Let’s look at some of these more closely.

  • Cultural beliefs / misperceptions about ....

What you should know about breast cancer and tips for reading online information

Since October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, I’ve been paying more attention to online blogs about breast cancer and realize there is a lot of information and misinformation out there. How can you know what’s correct, what’s marketing, and what is just plain wrong? Here are some tips:

  1. Be an aware and questioning reader: Ask yourself some of the following questions. What is the source of the information? Does the author have anything to gain financially from the information? Are there studies that provide data supporting the recommendations? Who funded the studies and were there any potential conflicts of interest?
  2. Investigate more than one source: Healthcare has become very politicized and complicated but you can find reliable sources. But realize even with trusted sources the information provided may be conflicting. Some reliable sources include: Swedish Cancer Institute, Breast Cancer Action, National Cancer Institute, and American Cancer Society.

  3. Don’t be taken in by conspiracy theorists: I have practiced surgery for 30 years in a variety of situations and healthcare institutions and NEVER have I experienced a desire to withhold effective tests and treatments from patients. Physicians and hospital systems are not suppressing tests, treatments, and /or cures in order to stay in business. I don’t know a breast surgeon who wouldn’t be thrilled to have to practice another specialty if there was a way to prevent breast cancer.

Here are some things that I think it is important to know about breast cancer:

What test is best for breast screening?

I often get asked why can’t a woman just get a breast MRI rather than a mammogram. The imaging tests that we do for breast cancer screening and evaluation of abnormalities have different strengths and weaknesses.

Mammograms are very useful as a screening tool. They can be done quickly and read efficiently by the breast radiologist. They have minimal radiation exposure. They can be done by a mobile coach in locations that are more convenient to patients. They are excellent for identifying abnormal calcium deposits within the breast tissue and for seeing disrupted tissue and masses. They may be less effective in women who have dense breast tissue but the digital techniques have helped some with that. 

Ultrasound is a great tool for evaluating a mass or tissue asymmetry found on mammograms. It can distinguish between a benign appearing solid mass, a fluid filled cyst, a mass that is suspicious for cancer, or normal appearing breast tissue. There is no radiation exposure. It is less reliable as a screening tool because it can be dependent on the skill of the physician or technologist doing the procedure. It is possible to miss abnormalities or to mis-interpret normal findings as abnormal. There are studies underway evaluating using an automated version of ultrasound as a screening test but the results are not conclusive and this is not considered ready for standard practice.

Breast MRI is a highly sensitive test that is very dependent on...

Getting a mammogram

Frequently women will ask me: Where should I get my mammograms? There are several things to think about.

First, you want to go to a Center that is accredited by the American College of Radiology. This means that they have high quality images and well-trained radiologists. It is preferable to have a digital mammogram but if that technology is not available, then film mammograms are better than not having one done. While it is not clear that digital mammograms improve survival, they do allow the radiologist to examine the images more clearly and to use computer assisted diagnostic tools.

The radiologists’ experience is also important. Dedicated breast centers usually have radiologists who are specialized in breast imaging. These sub-specialized radiologists are very experienced in using mammograms, ultrasound, and breast MRI to diagnose breast disorders and are less likely to miss abnormalities.

Convenience is also a consideration. You want to make it easy to get your mammograms. Some Breast Centers will have mobile mammography programs that will bring mammogram screening to your place of work, local community or senior center, or even your church or synagogue. If possible, it is a good idea to get your mammograms at the same Center or within the same hospital system every year. That way the radiologists have easy access to your prior studies and can compare them to the current ones.

Here are some other things to know about getting mammograms:

The True Family Women’s Cancer Center Opening

We at the Swedish Cancer Institute are excited about the new True Family Women’s Cancer Center, located in downtown Seattle, which opens on June 5. Recognizing that women may have unique needs when faced with a cancer diagnosis, the True Center brings together multiple specialists who treat women with all types of cancer and provide care that is compassionate, caring, and highly coordinated. It is funded entirely by philanthropy.

The True Center is located on floors 5 and 6 of the Arnold Pavilion at 1221 Madison. Floor 5 will house medical oncology teams, our psychiatrist, social workers, genetic counselors, naturopathic physicians, nutritionists, The Rivkin Ovarian Cancer Center Clinic offices, a patient education satellite, our American Cancer Society Patient Navigator, and a financial counselor. The 6th floor will be the home to our multidisciplinary clinic, which will house our breast surgery teams, cancer rehabilitation physician, physical therapists, and social worker. Also on Floor 6 will be gynecological oncology consultations and specialized breast imaging. Other specialists may also be available to see patients in the multidisciplinary clinic.

The co-location of these services allows for improved patient convenience and enhanced communication among the members of care provision teams. Instead of ...

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Offices

True Family Women's Cancer Center
1221 Madison St.
Seattle, WA 98104
Phone: 1-(855)-TRUECTR (1-855-8783287) or (206) 215-5900
Map & Directions
True Family Women's Cancer Center
1221 Madison St.
6th Floor
Seattle, WA 98104
Phone: 206-215-6400
Map & Directions

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