Michael Milder
Michael S. Milder, M.D.

Michael S. Milder, M.D.

Michael S. Milder, M.D.
Specialty

Hematology, Oncology - Medical, Oncology - Medical: Swedish Cancer Institute

Clinical Interests / Special Procedures Performed

Bleeding & Clotting Disorders, Blood Diseases, Hematologic Malignancies, Hematology, Hodgkin's Disease, Leukemia, Lymphoma, Myeloma, Oncology, Swedish Cancer Institute

  • Accepting Children: No
  • Accepting New Patients: Yes
  • Accepting Medicare: Yes
  • Accepting Medicaid/DSHS: Yes
Payment Methods Accepted:

Medicare, Medicaid/DSHS, Bill Insurance, VISA, Master Card, Cash, Check, American Express, Billing Service, Discover Card, Money Order

Insurance Accepted:

Contact this office for accepted insurance plans.

Additional Information:

University of Washington - Clinical Professor of Medicine; American College of Physicians - Fellow; National Institutes of Health - Nuclear Medicine


 

Dr. Milder was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Metropolitan Magazine (2011, 2012, 2013)

Physicians, nurses and physician assistants in King, Kitsap and Snohomish counties nominated colleagues they would choose to treat themselves and their loved ones.

News Release

Medical School

Washington University, MO

Residency

University of Washington, WA

Fellowship(s)

University of Washington - Hematology/Oncology

Board Certifications

Internal Medicine; Oncology

Professional Associations:

American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society of Hematology, Fellow of American College of Physicians, King County Medical Society, Washington State Medical Association

Additional Information:

University of Washington - Clinical Professor of Medicine; American College of Physicians - Fellow; National Institutes of Health - Nuclear Medicine


 

Dr. Milder was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Metropolitan Magazine (2011, 2012, 2013)

Physicians, nurses and physician assistants in King, Kitsap and Snohomish counties nominated colleagues they would choose to treat themselves and their loved ones.

News Release

What you should know about multiple myeloma

Recent news about the health of the distinguished journalist, Tom Brokaw, has focused attention on multiple myeloma, a malignant disease of the bone marrow. Myeloma is characterized by an uncontrolled growth of marrow plasma cells, which normally produce antibodies for our immune system. In its advanced stages, the overgrowth of these cells and their associated proteins can cause anemia, painful bone destruction, and kidney failure.
 
Until about 10 years ago, advanced myeloma was uniformly fatal with a typical survival of about 3 years. Recent years, however, have seen a remarkable improvement in treatment possibilities for myeloma. This began with the discovery that autologous stem cell transplantation could produce complete remissions and longer survival. In addition, a variety of chemotherapy drugs administered in combination with corticosteroid drugs, now produce responses in up to 80% of patients. This means about 80% of patients are surviving longer than 3 years after chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant.
 
Not all patients with myeloma require chemotherapy. Myeloma can exist in an early stage for years. This is called smoldering myeloma. Chromosome analysis is routinely done on myeloma cells and allows us to identify patients with more aggressive forms of the disease, and those requiring treatment due to signs of organ damage or bone pain.
 
The Swedish Cancer Institute has been a participant in clinical trials leading to the development of some of the effective new treatments for myeloma. We are currently participating in a study of pomalidomide, a newly approved agent, for patients with relapsed myeloma. Another study offers an investigational drug, MLN9708, for newly diagnosed patients.
 
While the new drugs are more effective and better tolerated than previous chemotherapy, all  ...

5 things to know about cancer screenings

Cancer causes 580,000 deaths a year in the United States. One in eight women will develop breast cancer and one in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during their lifetimes. However, many deaths can be prevented when cancer is detected at an early stage. Cancer screening and risk assessment tests are the tools we use to find cancers early.
 
How do we find early cancers?

Some cancer screenings can be done yourself at home at essentially no cost or risk. This includes regular self-examination of the breasts, testicles and skin. Home fecal occult blood testing can also be done to screen for colorectal cancer. Additional information on cancer screening and self-examinations can be found on websites such as www.cancer.org or www.webmd.com.

 
Other screening requires medical interventions. There is good evidence that well-targeted screening saves lives. However, screening tests such as mammography, colonoscopy and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) are  ...
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Offices

Medical Oncology / Ballard - Swedish Cancer Institute
5300 Tallman Ave NW
2 North
Seattle, WA 98107
Phone: 206-320-3514
Fax: 206-781-6011
Tuesday: 8:30-5:00, Thursday: 8:30-5:00

Map & Directions

Medical Oncology / First Hill - Swedish Cancer Institute
1221 Madison Street
Arnold Pavilion, Suite 200
Seattle, WA 98104
Phone: 1-(855)-XCANCER (1-855-9226237) or (206) 215-3600

Map & Directions

Medical Oncology / Ballard - Swedish Cancer Institute
5300 Tallman Avenue NW
Ballard, WA 98107
Phone: 206-781-6010
Fax: 206-781-6011

Map & Directions

Medical Oncology / First Hill - Swedish Cancer Institute
1221 Madison Street
Arnold Pavilion, Suite 200
Seattle, WA 98104
Phone: 206-386-2242
Fax: 206-215-3962

Monday:
8:30AM to 5:00 PM

Wednesday:
8:30AM to 5:00 PM

Friday
8:30AM to 5:00 PM


Map & Directions

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