Marlene Peng
Marlene Peng, MD

Marlene Peng, MD

Marlene Peng, MD
Specialty

Asthma/Allergy & Immunology, Pediatric Allergy

Clinical Interests / Special Procedures Performed

Allergy, Asthma, Drug Allergy, Eczema, Food Allergies, Pediatric Allergy

  • Accepting Children: Yes
  • Accepting New Patients: Yes
  • Accepting Medicare: Yes
  • Accepting Medicaid/DSHS: Yes
Insurance Accepted:

Contact this office for accepted insurance plans.

Philosophy of Care

Patients and physicians must work as a team to fulfill the patient’s goals.

Personal Interests

I enjoy hiking, cooking and spending time with my family.

Medical School

Northwestern University

Residency

Medical College of Wisconsin

Fellowship(s)

Medical College of Wisconsin

Board Certifications

American Board of Allergy/Immunology American Board of Pediatrics

Professional Associations:

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology; American Academy of Pediatrics; American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology; Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology; King County Medical Society

New products available for allergy treatment

For those with seasonal allergies, treatment can be as simple as an over-the-counter medication, but often requires more.  The good news is that there are a lot of options now. Some new products have been recently approved by the FDA to help individuals who are dealing with grass and ragweed allergies.

The treatment of nasal and eye symptoms from allergies includes antihistamines, nasal sprays and allergy shots.  Over the counter antihistamines include diphenhydramine (ex. Benadryl), loratadine (ex. Claritin), cetirizine (ex. Zyrtec), or fexofenadine (ex. Allegra).  Over the counter allergy eye drops are also available, such as ketotifen (ex.Zaditor).  Together, these help with itchy, sneezy, watery nose and eyes.  Nasal antihistamines are prescription and also help with these symptoms.  Nasal steroids help decrease congestion and postnasal drip.  

A long-standing solution ...

Managing your fall allergies and symptoms

Although it’s hard to avoid everything that triggers fall allergies, there are many things that can be done to limit or treat the side effects so everyone can enjoy the season.

What allergies present in the fall?

Dirt-based molds are the main trigger of fall outdoor allergies. Mold is in decaying that plant material in yards and parks, as well as in pumpkin patches, hay and barns. Because we tend to close up our homes as the weather gets worse, inside allergens may get worse. Indoor mold, dust mites and our pets can trigger symptoms.

How do I know I have fall allergies?

Symptoms are the same as you might experience in the spring. Congestion, sneezing, post-nasal drip and itchy, watery eyes are the most common signs of fall allergies.

How can I limit allergens and reduce allergy symptoms?

Tips for dealing with dust allergy

Although it’s hard to imagine, we are living and sleeping with thousands of little bugs called dust mites.

For many people, ignorance is bliss, but for those who are allergic, these bugs can cause lots of problems. Dust mite allergy symptoms include eye redness and discharge, itching, sneezing, congestion and trouble breathing. Dust mites are a problem all year long, but can be more obvious in the winter when people spend more time indoors.

Dust mites like to burrow into soft surfaces, like carpets, curtains, pillows, mattresses and stuffed animals. It is impossible to completely kill all dust mites, but here are six ways to minimize exposure:

5 tips for a more comfortable allergy season

 Here are five things you should know to help you have a more comfortable allergy season:

Spring has sprung, and so have our allergies

For many, spring is time to celebrate the end of constant rain and cold weather. For those with allergies, however, spring signals the beginning of misery. Often it starts with a little runny nose and tickle in the throat, but then becomes constant congestion, itchy eyes and nose and coughing.

Seasonal allergic rhinitis, or “hay fever,” affects more than 20% of people in the United States. Allergies are triggered by allergens such as pollen or mold spores. Many trees, grasses and weeds contain small and light pollens that are easily carried by the wind, causing allergy symptoms to flare up during their pollination season.

Unless an allergy sufferer decides never to go outside during the allergy season, preventing exposure to pollens will be difficult. Some tips that can decrease exposure include keeping the windows closed when pollen counts are high, washing hands and face after coming indoors or showering before bed, and wearing a mask when mowing the lawn or gardening. Peak pollen times are between 5 AM-10 AM, so minimizing outdoor activity during this time will also decrease exposure.

Allergies not only cause nasal and eye discomfort...

Results 1-5 of 5
  • 1

Offices

Minor & James Medical
First Hill Medical Building
515 Minor Ave., Suite 300
Seattle, WA 98104
Phone: 206-386-9514

Monday
9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Thursday
9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Friday
9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Request An Appointment Online

Map & Directions

Physicians: Is this your profile? Click here for info