Meade Elizabeth

Elizabeth Meade, MD


Specialties
  • Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
Accepting New Patients

General Information


Biography
Practicing family-centered care of hospitalized children in an environment that supports the unique needs of pediatric patients.
Additional Information

Dr. Meade was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Magazine (2014).

Surveys were mailed to physicians in King, Pierce, Snohomish and Kitsap counties. The survey asked physicians to name the provider they would seek out or recommend to loved ones.

News Release

Specialties
  • Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
Education Background
Medical School: University of Washington
Residency: University of California, Los Angeles
Languages
  • English

Publications

Blog

Mom's bacteria could prevent allergies in kids

November 23, 2016
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When babies are born, they encounter bacteria for the first time as they pass through the womb and into the world. That might not sound healthy, but it is. Elizabeth Meade, M.D., assistant chief of pediatrics at Swedish, explains why.

Back to school and bullying How to help your child

September 01, 2016

Heading back to school can be an exciting time, but it also can be fraught with anxiety, especially for kids who are bullied. If you think your child is a target, there are ways you can help. And if you suspect that your child is a bully, there also are things you can do. Watch this video to learn more.


Be nice! It's good for your health

August 26, 2016
Being kind isn’t just the right thing to do. Studies show that it’s also good for your health. This video explains how being kind is good medicine for you and others. And parents, learn how to model kindness for your kids and practice it as a family.
 

Opiate Abuse in Pediatric Patients

January 20, 2016

There is a quiet public health crisis in the US that is unknown to many parents and even physicians. Addiction to opiates, or narcotics, has skyrocketed. It is estimated that more than 2 million Americans abuse prescription opiate drugs, and we are now seeing increasing rates of heroin use for the first time in decades. This epidemic includes children.

What you should know about the Zika virus

January 19, 2016

You may have heard of the Zika virus and be wondering what the dangers are and who should be concerned. The CDC has issued an advisory for pregnant women and those trying to become pregnant.

Protect Against Melanoma in Kids

June 08, 2015

A study recently reported that melanoma rates have risen 250% in children and young adults since the 1970s.  Another study found that between 1973 and 2009, pediatric melanomas (age 19 or younger) increased by 2% per year.  As medical providers we are seeing an upward trend in skin cancers in all age groups – but predominantly among young women, which is thought to be due to tanning practices.  We also know that even rare sunburns early in childhood can dramatically increase risk for melanoma later in life.  There are lots of ways that parents can help protect children from sun exposure – here are some tips to help us do our best as summer approaches!

Parents: talk to your kids about e-cigarettes

November 24, 2014
Do you know what an e-cigarette is?  Does your child?  You may be surprised.  In 2012, 1.78 million U.S. students reported having used e-cigarettes.  And that number has only continued to increase.  Our communities have been slow to realize the impact of electronic cigarettes on our children, but this is an issue parents and pediatricians need to tackle head-on ...

Newborn screening testing in Washington

September 01, 2014

For most parents, the newborn period is a time of profound joy, incredible challenges, and LOTS of questions.  As pediatricians, some of the questions we are frequently asked are related to a simple blood test done on all infants in Washington State.  Commonly referred to as the “newborn screen” or “NBS”, “PKU”, or “newborn metabolic testing”, this test checks for several congenital disorders that are rare but can be life-threatening. 

Often parents want to know:

  • What does the test involve? The newborn screen is done by pricking the heel of the infant at around 24 hours of age, then collecting a few drops of blood onto a piece of test paper.  This is dried and then sent to the state lab, where the testing is performed.  Because some of the conditions may take several days to show up, the test is repeated at 7-14 days old (usually by your primary care doctor; it can also ...

When do kids need antibiotics?

February 28, 2014
Winter can seem like one long continuous “sick day” for families - kids pick up frequent infections at school or daycare and pass them around to everyone at home.  Often it feels like by the time the illness has worked its way through the household, a new one has started!  Even for physicians, it can sometimes be difficult to distinguish between viral and bacterial infections.  Since antibiotics cannot treat viruses, they are often over-prescribed - which can lead to significant side effects in children and also contributes bacteria becoming resistant to existing medications.  In November 2013, the American Academy of Pediatrics released an updated guidance regarding antibiotic treatment, helping answer the frequently asked question about when kids need antibiotics.

Here's what you should know about antibiotics in these situations:

  • Ear infections ...

What parents and teens should know about marijuana

December 30, 2013

In 2012, Washington passed legislation to legalize marijuana use for people 21 and over.  While still illegal for those under 21, it is important to understand how this might affect adolescents and children.

Facts about marijuana and teens:

  • In a 2009 national study, 32.8% of 12th graders had used marijuana in the last year, and 20.6% within the last month.
  • One in eight adolescents who start using marijuana by age 14 become dependent.
  • When prolonged marijuana use starts in the teen years it is linked to a significant drop in IQ points - and the decrease is irreparable.
  • Marijuana can affect memory and concentration, cause or exacerbate depression/anxiety/hallucinations, and negatively affect asthma and other chronic lung diseases.
  • Marijuana is much more potent now than in the past.  In 2012 the average concentration of THC in marijuana was 15% (compared to just 4% in the 1980s).
  • Harmful effects...

How to give safe gifts to children during the holidays

December 13, 2013

As the holidays approach, parents often wonder what toys are safe for their little ones.  When making your list and checking it twice, here are some tips to ensure that toys are appropriate for the age and developmental stage of your giftees.

For younger children/infants:

  • Make sure all parts are larger than the child’s mouth.  Most children age 3 and under consistently put toys in their mouth, and some older children do as well.  A small-parts tester, or “no-choke tube” is about the size of a small child’s airway and can be purchased to test parts if you are unsure.  If a part or toy fits inside the tube, it’s too small to be safe.
  • When buying stuffed toys, look for embroidered or secured parts rather than pieces (such as eyes or noses) that could be removed and swallowed.  Remove all loose strings and ribbons.  Avoid animals with stuffing made of small pellets or material that could cause ...

Clinical Experience

Specialties
  • Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
Services Provided
Clinical Interests
  • congenital heart disease
  • infant respiratory distress syndrome
  • travel vaccination