Lily JungHenson
Lily K. Jung Henson, M.D., M.M.M., FAAN

Lily K. Jung Henson, M.D., M.M.M., FAAN

Lily K. Jung Henson, M.D., M.M.M., FAAN
Specialty

Multiple Sclerosis, Neurology

Clinical Interests / Special Procedures Performed

General Neurology, Multiple Sclerosis, Neurology, Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

  • Accepting Children: No
  • Accepting New Patients: Yes
  • Accepting Medicare: Yes
  • Accepting Medicaid/DSHS: Yes
Payment Methods Accepted:

Medicare, Medicaid/DSHS, Sliding Fee Scale

Insurance Accepted:

Contact this office for accepted insurance plans.

Additional Information:

Internship: Northwestern University, ILMasters of Medical Management: Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, LA


 

Dr. Henson was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Metropolitan Magazine (2013)

Physicians, nurses and physician assistants in King, Kitsap and Snohomish counties nominated colleagues they would choose to treat themselves and their loved ones.

News Release

Dr. Henson was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Magazine (2014).

Surveys were mailed to physicians in King, Pierce, Snohomish and Kitsap counties. The survey asked physicians to name the provider they would seek out or recommend to loved ones.

News Release

Philosophy of Care

I believe in working with patients in a partnership to determine their medical care. My responsibilities as a neurologist are to educate, counsel and comfort my patients regarding their neurological condition.

Personal Interests

I'm a runner and cyclist. One of my proudest achievements is being a member of Marathon Maniacs.

Medical School

Northwestern University, IL

Residency

University of Washington, WA

Board Certifications

American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

Languages:

English, Cantonese

Professional Associations:

American Academy of Neurology

Awards:

National Multiple Sclerosis Society Advocacy Hall of Fame

Additional Information:

Internship: Northwestern University, ILMasters of Medical Management: Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, LA


 

Dr. Henson was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Metropolitan Magazine (2013)

Physicians, nurses and physician assistants in King, Kitsap and Snohomish counties nominated colleagues they would choose to treat themselves and their loved ones.

News Release

Dr. Henson was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Magazine (2014).

Surveys were mailed to physicians in King, Pierce, Snohomish and Kitsap counties. The survey asked physicians to name the provider they would seek out or recommend to loved ones.

News Release

clinical trials in MS including therapies, wellness, imaging

New MS therapy approved by the European Commission

On September 17, the European Commission, the European equivalent of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), approved the release of alemtuzumab (Lemtrada™.)

Alemtuzumab is an intravenous monoclonal antibody that selectively reduces circulating T lymphocytes, which are thought to be involved in inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS). This reduction is followed by repopulation of T and B cells over time. It is administered on five consecutive days in the first year of therapy, followed by three consecutive days 12 months later.

Swedish Neuroscience Institute was involved in Care-MS II, one of the pivotal Phase III studies in which MS patients who had relapsed on other therapies were randomized to either alemtuzumab or interferon beta-1a. The drug was found to be significantly ...

Do injectable therapies benefit progressive forms of MS?

The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) recently published their Top Five Recommendations in the Choosing Wisely Campaign in promoting high value neurological care. This was done in collaboration with the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation and Consumer Reports to reduce ineffective and costly care.

One of the AAN’s recommendations was to stop prescribing interferon-beta and glatiramer acetate to people who have progressive, non-relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS).

The AAN made clear that  the recommendations were intended to promote discussion between patients and their providers about the value of these therapies, not to completely stop the use of specific treatments.

The recommendation to stop prescribing interferon-beta and glatiramer acetate is not unanimously supported by all MS neurologists, many of whom feel that this was an oversimplification.

People with ...

MS Research Update: Safety of oral MS medication with effective birth control

Teriflunomide (Aubagio) is a once daily oral disease modifying therapy approved for treating patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). One of the limitations of its use is its black box warning for potential fetal harm due to birth defects noted in rats and rabbits. Women who are of childbearing age who are not using reliable birth control are advised to not use teriflunomide.

At the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers annual meeting on May 30, I presented a poster describing 81 pregnancies in female patients and 20 pregnancies in partners of male patients in nine teriflunomide clinical studies. Of these pregnancies, none of the 20 babies born to female patients and 12 live births in partners of male patients had any structural or functional problems. The mean known birth weight and mean gestational age were normal, as was the miscarriage rate.

These findings are consistent with ..

MS Research Update: Pulse therapy for breakthrough multiple sclerosis

A small pilot study from the University of Southern California suggests a pulse adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy could be effective in patients with breakthrough multiple sclerosis attacks while on beta-interferon. “Breakthrough” attacks that occur after starting a disease modifying therapy (DMT).

 

The study compared the safety and benefits of monthly pulse ACTH to monthly methylprednisone (MP) pulse in patients on beta-interferon. Over 15 months, researchers found that those treated with ACTH had fewer relapses and fewer psychiatric side effects. ACTH gel is currently used to treat MS relapses, but researchers note it may be able to alter the body’s immune responses beyond producing steroids.

 

As I discussed with the Medscape reporter, Megan Brooks, last week, the results of this study are ....

Emerging therapies in multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is unique among neurological diseases in that there are currently eight treatments for this one condition that have received approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Five of these drugs require subcutaneous or intramuscular injection, two are administered intravenously, and fingolimod, the newest agent on the block, is given orally. None are considered curative, but these disease-modifying therapies (DMT) have led to a reduction in relapse rates and the progression of disability.

Despite this progress, each of the drugs comes with side effects, including flu-like symptoms with the interferons, lipoatrophy with glatiramer, progressive multifocal leukodystrophy (PML) with natalizumab, and congestive heart failure or leukemia with mitoxantrone. As the first oral agent for MS, fingolimod created great expectations prior to FDA approval. Its popularity, however, has been surprisingly limited, presumably due to the potential for unknown long-term risks. The occur rence of PML with natalizumab demonstrated to MS neurologists and patients the potential risks associated with new drugs.

Additional DMTs in the pipeline may increase MS-management effectiveness in coming years, although safety will continue to be a major consideration in the use of these drugs. For instance, oral cladribine was on the verge of FDA approval in early March when the agency referred the drug back for more safety studies. This drug is already used in intravenous form for the management of hairy cell leukemia, but it is being studied for use with remitting relapsing MS because of its apoptotic effects on lymphocytes. If cladribine is ultimately approved for use, the risk of infection and neoplasms may limit its use.

Other oral agents being studied include:

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Neurology - Issaquah
751 N.E. Blakely Dr.
4th Floor
Issaquah, WA 98029
Phone: 425-313-7070
Fax: 425-313-7179

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