Kristiina Huckabay
Kristiina Huckabay, AuD

Kristiina Huckabay, AuD

Kristiina Huckabay, AuD
  • Accepting Children: Yes
  • Accepting New Patients: Yes
  • Accepting Medicare: Yes
  • Accepting Medicaid/DSHS: Yes
Insurance Accepted:

Contact this office for accepted insurance plans.

Philosophy of Care

Kristiina Huckabay, AuD provides a wide range of diagnostic audiologic and amplification services from infant through geriatrics and is dedicated to a high-quality of care. She enjoys educating each individual regarding their unique audiometric configuration, in order to understand the implications of their hearing loss in their communicative environments. For individuals motivated to improve their communication abilities, Dr. Huckabay will educate each patient regarding the numerous amplification options that exist and assist them in making an informed decision regarding their hearing healthcare.

Personal Interests

Traveling, cross country and alpine skiing, water sports and spending time with family.

Medical School

Arizona School of Health Sciences

Board Certifications

Board Certified in Audiology

Languages:

English

Professional Associations:

Affiliate Instructor at the University of Washington's Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, American Academy of Audiology (AAA), American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), Certificate of Clinical Competency in Audiology (CCC-A)

Awards:

Inaugural Future Leaders of Audiology Conference, Audiology Foundation of America (AFA) Professional Leadership Award

Protect your hearing at Seattle's Seafair

Blue Angels! Cheering fans! Hydroplanes! Live music! Fireworks! Along with the excitement Seafair brings to Seattle, it also brings a lot of noise! The otolaryngologists and audiologists at Swedish Otolaryngology want you to enjoy these events, while protecting your precious hearing. The sound of a jet engine can be up to 120 dB at take-off and even 30 seconds of exposure to this sound can cause permanent noise damage (American Academy of Audiology website).
 


Here are some tips for protecting your hearing:

Wear ...

How to manage tinnitus (when your ears are ringing)

Almost all individuals experience ”transient ear noises” which is the intermittent sensation of ringing (lasting less than 5 minutes), typically in one ear. At times this sensation is accompanied by a sensation of fullness or a momentary change in hearing. When this change is brief, it is a normal phenomenon.  If it lasts longer than 5 minutes twice week, you should be evaluated for tinnitus.

What should I do when my ear(s) start ringing? 

The first step is a comprehensive hearing evaluation by an audiologist.  Tinnitus can be caused by a variety of auditory disorders and a complete audiology evaluation will confirm and/or rule out many of these conditions.  Pending the hearing test results, you may be referred to an otolaryngologist (sometimes referred to as an ENT or an Ear, Nose and Throat physician) or other health care providers.  The otolaryngologist will further investigate your tinnitus for possible medical causes. 

It is normal for tinnitus to occasionally change in the pitch and intensity; however, significant and prolonged changes in tinnitus (increased loudness or tinnitus that is one-sided) should be (re)evaluated.   Tinnitus that is present in one ear (unilateral) or pulsatile will always require an otolaryngology evaluation after the hearing evaluation.  Tinnitus that is accompanied by a sudden hearing loss is considered an emergent condition and individuals should be evaluated by an audiologist and otolaryngologist as soon as possible.

How can I manage my tinnitus?

Tinnitus can evoke ...

Hearing loss in the workplace

Hearing loss is a term that many associate with an aging population. For some it may trigger memories of large, obvious and obtrusive hearing aids or devices that squealed!  This is not the reality in 2013.  A look at the individuals I see every day as an audiologist reveals a large number of employed professionals who are encountering difficulty in work environments.  From telephone work to conference and lunch meetings, hearing loss is impacting our workforce.

The National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) estimates that nearly 1 in 5 Americans between the ages of 45-64 years of age experience hearing loss.  The prevalence of hearing loss increases with age and with an aging workforce that includes many working well into their 70s, it should be noted that the incidence of hearing loss increases to 1 in 3 for Americans between the ages of 65-74 years of age.  We now have a culture of employment that includes unique viewpoints from four generations working side by side.   Many of us are aware that intergenerational communication styles may vary.  It would behoove us to also consider hearing loss as we think about intergenerational communication in the workplace. 

Individuals who work in a quiet or solitary environment may “get by” with their hearing loss. However, most individuals will encounter much more complex listening environments at work. Imagine if you had hearing loss and were required to listen in the following environments:

  • Working in a cubicle environment where colleagues speak from behind or speak over/through walls.
  • Participating in conference calls and telephone calls in which there are no visual cues to supplement the speaker’s voice.
  • Participating in conference room meetings where distance can create a barrier in the ability to hear individuals around the table.
  • Listening to individuals with ...

Sleigh bells ring, are you listening? (Tips for better hearing at the holidays)

The holidays are a busy time! Some love the hustle and bustle of the holidays and others can be worn down with to-do lists, shopping, planning and parties. Individuals with hearing loss can be especially impacted by the holidays if they are attending parties and group gatherings. They may be listening to unfamiliar voices and meeting people for the first time. Here are a few tips to support your family member through this busy time of the year.

Friends and family members can support someone with hearing loss in the following ways:

  • When attending group settings or restaurants, try to find a quiet area.
  • If you notice someone is not tuning into the conversation, try to repeat, rephrase or state the topic.
  • At times your family member may just need a listening break. Excuse yourselves and find a quite space to visit alone for a few minutes. Or better yet, participate in “people watching” and really give those ears a break!
  • Help with introductions by saying “you remember Bob, we met him last year at the holiday party.”
  • A little understanding can go a long way. If you are curious what your family member might be experiencing, listen to the hearing loss simulator and choose “speech in a restaurant”. I can guarantee you will be shocked to experience the impact of hearing loss on speech understanding. Imagine working that hard to understand speech for a few hours at the end of the day in a loud setting.

For individuals with hearing loss:

What is an audiologist?

An audiologist is a master’s or doctoral level trained professional who evaluates, treats and manages hearing and balance disorders in children and adults. Audiologist work in a variety of settings such as medical centers, private practice clinics, universities, schools, Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) physician clinics, Veteran’s Administration and military settings.

At Swedish, you will find caring and talented audiologists with a wealth of clinical experiences. The audiologists at Swedish have experience with infant through geriatric diagnostic hearing evaluations, auditory evoked potentials, vestibular evaluations, tinnitus management and the selection and fitting of hearing aids. Additionally, audiologists work closely with surgeons to complete the fitting and programming of osseo-integrated devices, cochlear implants and brainstem implants following surgery.

Because most hearing issues are not medically treatable, most individuals with hearing loss work...

Five Tips for Better Hearing

Did you know that portable music players produce sound at up to 100 decibels? That’s approaching the level of a jet plane taking off, which measures 120 decibels. Any volumes higher than 85 decibels can cause hearing loss if listened to for prolonged periods of time.

May is Better Hearing Month, celebrated by the American Academy of Audiology. It’s a great time to assess the health of your hearing, and recognize its importance in daily life.

Small changes in day-to-day activities can go a long way in maintaining good hearing in the future:

Results 1-6 of 6
  • 1

Offices

Otolaryngology - Ballard
1801 N.W. Market Street
Suite 411
Seattle, WA 98107
Phone: 206-781-6072
Fax: 206-781-6073
Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

Map & Directions

Otolaryngology - First Hill
600 Broadway
Suite 200
Seattle, WA 98122
Phone: 206-215-1770
Fax: 206-215-1771
Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

Map & Directions

Physicians: Is this your profile? Click here for info

Affiliations

This provider is affiliated with: