Kelley Hanrahan
Kelley A. Hanrahan, M.D.

Kelley A. Hanrahan, M.D.

Kelley A. Hanrahan, M.D.
Specialty

OB/GYN Physician, Obstetrics and Gynecology

Clinical Interests / Special Procedures Performed

Gynecological Surgery

  • Accepting Children: No
  • Accepting New Patients: Yes
  • Accepting Medicare: Yes
  • Accepting Medicaid/DSHS: Yes
Payment Methods Accepted:

Medicare, Bill Insurance, VISA, Master Card, Cash, Check

Insurance Accepted:

Contact this office for accepted insurance plans.

Additional Information:

American College of OB/GYN Washington State Medical Association King County Medical Association Washington State Obstetrical Association Seattle Gynecological Society American Medical Women’s Association Alpha Omega Alpha & American Medical Women’s Association Merit Award, 2004

Philosophy of Care

Each individual patient deserves special attention. Listening and spending some extra time learning about the person as well as the medical concerns creates a level of comfort and understanding that enables a highly productive health partnership between a doctor and patient.

Personal Interests

Spending time with my husband and 2 children. Running, cooking and outdoor recreation.

Medical School

Indiana University School of Medicine, IN

Residency

University of Cincinnati, OH

Board Certifications

American Board of Obstetrics & Gynecology State of Washington Medical License

Professional Associations:

American College of OB/GYN; Washington State Medical Association; King County Medical Association; Washington State Obstetrical Association; Seattle Gynecological Society; American Medical Women's Association

Awards:

Alpha Omega Alpha; American Medical Women's Association Merit Award ~ 2004

Additional Information:

American College of OB/GYN Washington State Medical Association King County Medical Association Washington State Obstetrical Association Seattle Gynecological Society American Medical Women’s Association Alpha Omega Alpha & American Medical Women’s Association Merit Award, 2004

Why pregnant women should receive flu vaccine and pertussis booster

Why do we recommend that pregnant women receive both the flu vaccine and the pertussis booster during pregnancy? Here are a few reasons:
 
The influenza virus, better known as the flu, has been proven over and over to have the potential to cause serious disease in pregnancy.  That includes an increased risk that when pregnant women “catch” the flu, they may require admission to the intensive care unit, require a ventilator and, less commonly, even death.  It’s serious.   Babies of women who are infected with the flu during pregnancy are more likely to be born prematurely and are at increased risk for stillbirth.

We recommend the flu vaccine at any point in pregnancy and offer the single dose, preservative free vaccine in our office to all pregnant women (with the exception of those who have a medical reason not to get it.)  A common misconception is that the vaccine causes the flu - it does not.  Another misconception is that it is not safe for the developing baby to be exposed to the vaccine itself or the immune response it generates.  There is no evidence to support this fear in almost 50 years of administrating this vaccine and close follow up of those receiving it.

We recommend the flu shot, which is an inactivated virus. The Flumist is a live attenuated virus that is not recommended in pregnancy.

Your family members should also receive the vaccine as they can pass the flu on to a newborn who has not yet gotten the vaccine.  Babies can suffer severe complications if they are infected with the virus before they can receive the vaccine.
 
The other vaccine we recommend during pregnancy is the Tdap booster.  The benefit of the pertussis booster outweighs any perceived risk.  Pertussis, or the whooping cough, is at epidemic levels especially on the west coast including Washington State.  That may be  ...

What is umbilical cord blood banking?

Umbilical cord blood banking is a procedure where your OB takes some of the blood (and now tissue) from the placenta and umbilical cord after your baby is born and the cord has been cut. You may never have thought about what we do with that stuff.

What happens to your baby's umbilical cord?

In the past, it has usually been discarded as medical waste, although some women want to take it home with them. Over the last two decades medical advances have been developed in which the cells from that blood can be used to treat several diseases. The cells have unique characteristics that allow them to change into a multitude of different cell types (called pluripotent cells.) The idea is that some children and adults with certain genetic abnormalities or certain cancers can benefit from these cells. The cells can be grown to replenish the normal cells or treat abnormal cells.

The options for umbilical cord banking are divided primarily into what’s called public and private cord blood banking.

Private cord banking

Private cord banking is just what it sounds like: we collect the blood at the time of your delivery and you send it to a business that processes it and stores it for you. The cost of this varies currently from somewhere between $2000 and $3000 for initial processing and from about $120 and $300 per year to store it. In this case, you are storing the cells for yourself and your family.

Public cord banking

Alternatively, public cord banking is something anyone who delivers at certain hospitals has the opportunity to do. There is a public cord blood system that has been growing since 1990 that is similar to the blood bank and is used for individuals who need the blood due to illness or injury.

At Swedish, all patients can donate cord blood to the Puget Sound Blood Center. The cord blood collected for this bank is available to all individuals based on need. The cord blood collected is not specifically available to the individual who donated it. We are happy to collect blood from all families, but are finding increased needs in patients who are ethnic minorities or a mixed race couple. The cord blood also can be directed to Fred Hutchinson Research Center for ongoing research regarding current and future treatments.

Isn't cord blood banking controversial?

There are ...

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Offices

Minor & James Medical
Nordstrom Tower
1229 Madison St., Suite 1500
Seattle, WA 98104
Phone: 206-292-2200
Fax: 206-292-7967

Monday
8:30 AM to 4:30 PM
Tuesday
8:30 AM to 4:30 PM
Thursday
8:30 AM to 4:30 PM
Friday
8:30 AM to 4:30 PM
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