K. Linnea Peterson
K. Linnea Peterson, M.D., FACS

K. Linnea Peterson, M.D., FACS

K. Linnea Peterson, M.D., FACS
Specialty

Head and Neck Surgery

Clinical Interests / Special Procedures Performed

Endoscopic Sinus Surgery, ENT (Adult), ENT (Pediatric), Facial Palsy (Bell's Palsy), Head and Neck Surgery, Oral Lesions, Otitis Media, Otolaryngology, Pediatric ENT, Pediatric Nasal & Sinus Disorders, Pediatric Otolaryngology, Pediatric Sinus Surgery, Pediatric Sleep Apnea, Sinus Surgery, Sinusitis, Sleep Apnea, Sleep Apnea Surgery, Snoring and Apnea Surgery, Swallowing Disorders, Thyroid Biopsy, Thyroid Diseases, Thyroid Surgery, Tracheal Problems, Voice Disorders

  • Accepting Children: Yes
  • Accepting New Patients: Yes
  • Accepting Medicare: Yes
  • Accepting Medicaid/DSHS: Yes
Payment Methods Accepted:

Medicare, Medicaid/DSHS, Bill Insurance, VISA, Master Card, Cash, Check, American Express, Discover Card

Insurance Accepted:

Contact this office for accepted insurance plans.

Additional Information:

““Dr. Peterson was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Metropolitan Magazine (2012)

Nearly 4,500 physicians, nurses and physician assistants in King, Kitsap and Snohomish counties nominated colleagues they would choose to treat themselves and their loved ones.

News Release

Philosophy of Care

I believe that communication is central to patient care. Helping patients to understand the considerations and treatment options is a key aspect of quality.

Personal Interests

Photography, running, hiking, travel, skiing

Medical School

University of Iowa

Residency

UCLA

Fellowship(s)

National Center for Voice and Speech, The University of Iowa

Board Certifications

American Board of Otolaryngology

Professional Associations:

American Academy of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, The American Medical Association, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, the Northwest Academy of Otolaryngology, and the National Spasmodic Dysphonia Association

Awards:

SeattleMet 2010 Top Doctor for Ear Nose and Throat

Additional Information:

““Dr. Peterson was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Metropolitan Magazine (2012)

Nearly 4,500 physicians, nurses and physician assistants in King, Kitsap and Snohomish counties nominated colleagues they would choose to treat themselves and their loved ones.

News Release

12th Man Fans: Protect your voice and hearing!

The infectious energy of Seahawks fans is part of what makes the team one of the most exciting to watch in the NFL.  This team spirit has caught the attention of Guinness world record officials who are verifying that the “12th Man” fans are the loudest in the NFL.  You can show your support and enjoy being a part of the “12th Man” while taking a few precautions to protect your hearing and your voice during and after the game. 

Swedish Otolaryngology cheers on the Seahawks.

Here are a few tips:

  • Wear hearing protection during the game. 

High levels of noise can result in tinnitus in the hours and days following the game.  This ringing in the ears can be a sign of permanent damage from excessive noise exposure.  Anything from large headphones to simple foam plugs are adequate for hearing protection.  The roar of the crowd will still be audible, but the dampening will protect your ears and ....

Why is it hard to swallow?

Many people suffer from difficulty swallowing (dysphagia) acutely or chronically. Difficulty with swallowing may be a result of a problem anywhere from the lips to the stomach. It may be identified by weight loss, coughing or choking when eating, delayed cough or regurgitation, or outright obstruction. This is more likely to be an issue after a stroke or in elderly and frail individuals. In the inpatient population, symptoms suggesting some level of dysphagia may be as high as 34%. So what do you do if you feel like your swallow isn’t quite right?

How our voices work, and what to do when a voice doesn't work

A voice is an amazing thing.

With our voice, we convey information, express emotion and provide entertainment. We each have our own unique vocal ‘fingerprint’ that allows our friends to recognize us when we call them on the phone. We rely on our voice to win a debate, negotiate a contract, reassure a frightened child, and to celebrate a victory. Our tone conveys honesty, anger, happiness and fear. A song can inspire a spectrum of emotions, and recall past memories.

So how does our voice work? And what do you do when it doesn’t work?

Voice is produced when air is pushed up from the lungs to the level of the vocal cords. The vocal cords vibrate, producing sound. The vocal cords tense, lengthen and stretch to produce different frequencies. The sound is then shaped by the upper airway to add resonance and articulation resulting in speech or song.

The vocal cords themselves are thin bands of tissue over muscle. They sit within a framework that has a complex nerve supply and multiple paired muscles that allow very nuanced changes in vibration of the vocal cords, well demonstrated in professional singers.

Subtle differences in vibration or movement can ...

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Offices

Otolaryngology - First Hill
600 Broadway
Suite 200
Seattle, WA 98122
Phone: 206-215-1770
Fax: 206-215-1771
Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

Map & Directions

Otolaryngology - Issaquah
751 N.E. Blakely Dr.
5th Floor
Issaquah, WA 98029
Phone: 425-313-7089

Map & Directions

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