James Bowen
James D Bowen, MD

James D Bowen, MD

James D Bowen, MD
Specialty

Multiple Sclerosis, Neurology

Clinical Interests / Special Procedures Performed

Multiple Sclerosis, Multiple Sclerosis Clinics at SNI, Neuroimmunology

  • Accepting Children: Yes
  • Accepting New Patients: Yes
  • Accepting Medicare: Yes
  • Accepting Medicaid/DSHS: Yes
Payment Methods Accepted:

Medicare, Medicaid/DSHS, Bill Insurance, VISA, Master Card, Cash, Check, Payment Plan, Sliding Fee Scale

Insurance Accepted:

Contact this office for accepted insurance plans.

Additional Information:

Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology, University of Washington National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Health Professionals and Researchers Volunteer Hall of Fame


Dr. Bowen was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Metropolitan Magazine (2011, 2012)

Nearly 4,500 physicians, nurses and physician assistants in King, Kitsap and Snohomish counties nominated colleagues they would choose to treat themselves and their loved ones.

News Release

Dr. Bowen was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Magazine (2012). 

A survey was mailed to more than 18,000 physicians in King, Pierce, Snohomish and Kitsap counties. The survey asked physicians to name the provider they would seek out or recommend to loved ones.

News Release

Philosophy of Care

In caring for people with multiple sclreosis and related disorders, it is important to address every aspect of care, including medical and nonmedical issues, to best partner with patients in achieving their highest level of well-being.

Personal Interests

In addition to spending time with my wife and two daughters, I enjoy playing classical guitar, mountaineering, backcountry skiing and home construction projects.

Medical School

Johns Hopkins

Residency

University of Washington

Board Certifications

American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

Languages:

English

Professional Associations:

American Academy of Neurology

Awards:

National MS Society Volunteer Health Professional and Researchers Hall of Fame

Additional Information:

Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology, University of Washington National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Health Professionals and Researchers Volunteer Hall of Fame


Dr. Bowen was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Metropolitan Magazine (2011, 2012)

Nearly 4,500 physicians, nurses and physician assistants in King, Kitsap and Snohomish counties nominated colleagues they would choose to treat themselves and their loved ones.

News Release

Dr. Bowen was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Magazine (2012). 

A survey was mailed to more than 18,000 physicians in King, Pierce, Snohomish and Kitsap counties. The survey asked physicians to name the provider they would seek out or recommend to loved ones.

News Release

Dr. Bowen’s research interests span a variety of aspects of MS research but particularly emphasize clinical trials of treatments. He is also involved as a peer and ad hoc reviewer for numerous publications and has authored more than 200 articles, abstracts and publications relating to MS and other neurological diseases.

MS in the Pacific Northwest on 12/9

All are invited to attend the presentation, “Multiple Sclerosis in the Pacific Northwest,” on Monday, Dec. 9 at 7 p.m. in Kirkland. I'll discuss multiple sclerosis as a disease, trends, changes in its distribution around the world, and how it uniquely impacts our region. The presentation is free and is open to all ages. Click here for more information.

Gut Microbiome: Studying the links between people, bacteria, and MS

Our bodies are made of billions of cells. However, the cells in our bodies are far outnumbered by the bacteria that cover our skin and inhabit our gut. These bacteria are now increasingly recognized to have an important role in maintaining our health. For example, skin bacteria help protect us from more dangerous bacteria that could invade us. Gut bacteria help digest our food. There are suggestions that changes in these bacteria, particularly those in the gut, might play a role in several diseases.

Swedish MS Center represented at Congress of the European Committee for the Treatment and Research in MS

The 29th Congress of the European Committee for the Treatment and Research in MS (ECTRIMS) and the 18th Annual Conference on Rehabilitation in MS (RIMS) were held on October 2-5 in Copenhagen, Denmark. These two meetings are the largest scientific meetings on MS and rehabilitation in MS, with over 8,000 people attending this year.

The MS Center at Swedish was well-represented with five people attending. The meeting consisted of educational courses, symposia and scientific research presentations. The scientific presentations included over 1200 posters describing recent research in MS. There were also over 200 oral scientific research presentations. Upcoming blog posts will cover some of the reports that were of most interest to us.

Proteomics identifies protein changes in multiple sclerosis and CIS

A recent study published in the journal PLOS ONE found differences in protein levels of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) among people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and clinically isolated syndrome (CIS).

Using the relatively new field of proteomics, researchers were able to identify each individual protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)—86 total—and compares their levels among people with relapsing MS, clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and healthy individuals. People with RRMS had different levels of 20 proteins compared to people with CIS. Seventy five percent of those proteins related to neurons (rather than myelin). Changes were particularly notable for proteins related to neurons in participants with CIS.

This study is one of many MS studies coming from the relatively new field of proteomics. This field uses ...

Multiple Sclerosis Cyclists Ride Cross-Country to Swedish

Help us thank and congratulate them Sunday, August 4. Photo from Diane Mattens.

More than 30 bike riders will arrive at the MS Center at Swedish on the afternoon of Sunday, August 4 to celebrate their cross-country bike ride and to make a contribution in support of the Center. We are seeking MS Center patients and friends to help us welcome the riders, including Swedish patient, Diane Mattens, and to thank them for their generous support.

The cyclists will be wrapping up their 4,295 mile bike ride that began...

Multiple sclerosis MRI technique can spot tissue damage months before an MS attack

A study published in this week’s Neurology found that a relatively new MRI technique could spot changes in the brain up to three months before inflammation causes a multiple sclerosis (MS) attack.

Traditionally, we have viewed MS as a disease where the immune system attacks the brain, causing the abrupt onset of inflammation (measured by gadolinium enhancement). This inflammation causes damage to the brain, which causes symptoms.

The new technique, called susceptibility-weighted imaging, allows researchers to see that tissue damage is happening up to three months prior to the inflammation.

Susceptibility-weighted imaging measures the amount of magnetic susceptibility of tissues aligned in different directions. The amount of alignment in different directions is called the phase image. In tissues like myelin, the magnetic susceptibility lines up with the direction of the myelin because molecules can move alongside the myelin more easily than they can move across it.

When myelin is damaged, the tissue becomes disorganized and magnetic susceptibility changes from aligning primarily in one direction to alignment in many different directions. The phase image can be used to measure the degree of myelin damage.

In this study, 20 patients ...

MS Research Update: Birth month may affect your risk for multiple sclerosis

There are many studies that show that the risks for getting multiple sclerosis (MS) vary according to the month a person is born. However, the differences between the months of birth are slight.

 

For example, a 2005 study of people with MS living in northern latitudes found that more people (9.1%) had a birthday in May and significantly less (8.5%) were born in November. The opposite pattern is seen in the southern hemisphere. Thus, worldwide there is a slight increase in MS risk in those born in the spring and a decrease in those born in the winter.

 

The cause of this has not been determined. Some ideas include differences in:

  • Vitamin intake during pregnancy (more folate in fresh vegetables in the spring, more vitamin D from sunlight in the summer)

  • Birth weight - Heavier babies born after summer and fall pregnancies
  • Exposure to viruses - More people experience viruses in spring and fall. This may affect the not only the viruses a baby is exposed to during pregnancy, but also after birth.

 

A recent article in JAMA Neurology describes ...

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Offices

Multiple Sclerosis Center
1600 East Jefferson
A Level
Seattle, WA 98122
Phone: 206-320-2200
Fax: 206-320-2560
Map & Directions
Multiple Sclerosis Center at Swedish
1600 E. Jefferson St., Suite 205
Seattle, WA 98122
Phone: (206) 320-2200
Fax: (206) 386-2560
Monday
8:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Tuesday
8:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Wednesday
8:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Thursday
8:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Friday
8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

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