Drew Schembre
Drew B. Schembre, M.D.

Drew B. Schembre, M.D.

Drew B. Schembre, M.D.
Specialty

Gastroenterology

Clinical Interests / Special Procedures Performed

Celiac Sprue Disease, Colon Cancer, Colon Cancer Screening, Colonoscopy, Endoscopic Ultrasound, Endoscopy, Esophageal Cancer, Familial Colon Cancer, Gastro-Esophageal Reflux, Gastrointestinal Cancer, GI Stents, Pancreatic Cancer DX, Pancreatitis, Photodynamic Therapy, Radiofrequency Ablation, Stenting

  • Accepting Children: No
  • Accepting New Patients: Yes
  • Accepting Medicare: Yes
  • Accepting Medicaid/DSHS: Yes
Insurance Accepted:

Contact this office for accepted insurance plans.

Additional Information:

Dr. Schembre was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Metropolitan Magazine (2013)

Physicians, nurses and physician assistants in King, Kitsap and Snohomish counties nominated colleagues they would choose to treat themselves and their loved ones.

News Release

Dr. Schembre was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Magazine (2013, 2014).

Surveys were mailed to physicians in King, Pierce, Snohomish and Kitsap counties. The survey asked physicians to name the provider they would seek out or recommend to loved ones.

News Release

Medical School

Middlebury College, Middlebury Vermont, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ

Residency

Internal Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

Fellowship(s)

Gastroenterology, University of Utah, Advanced Endoscopy, Columbia Presbyterian, New York, NY

Board Certifications

Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology

Additional Information:

Dr. Schembre was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Metropolitan Magazine (2013)

Physicians, nurses and physician assistants in King, Kitsap and Snohomish counties nominated colleagues they would choose to treat themselves and their loved ones.

News Release

Dr. Schembre was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Magazine (2013, 2014).

Surveys were mailed to physicians in King, Pierce, Snohomish and Kitsap counties. The survey asked physicians to name the provider they would seek out or recommend to loved ones.

News Release

Preventing progression of Barrett's esophagus to cancer without surgery

Many people wonder what the treatment for Barrett's Esophagus (BE) is. Treatment for BE without dysplasia consists primarily of controlling esophageal acid exposure, usually with once a day proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medications like omeprazole (Prilosec®). Occasionally, twice a day dosing or even anti-reflux surgery may be necessary to completely control acid reflux. Unfortunately, suppressing acid does not usually cause the Barrett’s tissue to regress or even prevent it from progressing to cancer.

If dysplasia is found on any biopsies, treatment recommendations change:

  • Low-grade dysplasia: Close surveillance with endoscopy every 6-12 months or ablation.
  • High-grade dysplasia: Endoscopic therapy to destroy Barrett’s tissue or surgery.
  • Early cancer: Endoscopic removal of focal cancer followed by tissue destruction or surgery

Experiments performed 20 years ago showed that in most people, once the Barrett’s tissue has been removed or destroyed, normal squamous tissue tends to regrow in the area as long as acid reflux is suppressed.

Endoscopic tissue destruction can be performed many ways:

Barrett’s Esophagus and Esophageal Cancer: The dark side of the acid reflux epidemic

Heartburn (which was once considered an annoying result of over-eating) has matured into a full-blown medical condition better known as gastro-esophageal reflux or GERD.

GERD, or the sensation of acid or other gastric fluids washing up into the chest or mouth, affects as many as 1 in 5 adults in the US on a monthly basis with up to 6% experiencing symptoms 2 or more times per week. Estimates suggest that about 5% of those who suffer from reflux will develop a potentially pre-malignant condition called Barrett’s esophagus (BE). Named after the British thoracic surgeon who erroneously suggested the condition resulted from a congenitally short esophagus, BE is characterized by “specialized intestinal lining” replacing normal squamous epithelium (ie, wet skin, like the lining of the mouth) in the lower esophagus in response to long-term, repetitive exposure to stomach acid.

While this may seem like a protective adaptation—Barrett’s tissue will not ulcerate and develop scarring the way squamous tissue does—it is inherently unstable and can progress to cancer. The risk for developing adenocarcinoma of the esophagus for people with BE is more than 30 times greater than for people without it.

Luckily, the absolute risk of progression from BE to cancer is relatively low. BE progresses to esophageal cancer at the rate of around 0.2% per year. Further, cancer doesn’t usually develop suddenly. Instead, it progresses through a series of stages termed “dysplasia” meaning bad or unfavorable changes that can be identified on biopsies collected at endoscopy. These changes progress from...

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Offices

Gastroenterology - Seattle - First Hill
1221 Madison St.
Suite 1220
Seattle, WA 98104
Phone: 206-215-4250
Fax: 206-215-4252

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