Brenna Carroll
Brenna Carroll, AuD

Brenna Carroll, AuD

Brenna Carroll, AuD
  • Accepting Children: Yes
  • Accepting New Patients: Yes
  • Accepting Medicare: Unknown
  • Accepting Medicaid/DSHS: Unknown
Insurance Accepted:

Contact this office for accepted insurance plans.

Philosophy of Care

Brenna Carroll, AuD, enjoys working with infant through geriatric populations. Her clinical interests include diagnostic audiology utilizing both behavioral and electrophysiological testing measurements and rehabilitative audiology through the fitting of amplification. Dr. Carroll’s philosophy includes a dedication to excellence and a strong belief in patient focused care. She enjoys the opportunity to combine personal interactions and patient relationships with scientific data to uniquely tailor diagnostic and rehabilitation approaches. Dr. Carroll is dedicated to providing a comprehensive explanation of test results and a detailed explanation of the impact of the results on communication. She feels very firmly that all visits should conclude with gained understanding about hearing loss, the implications of the individual’s hearing loss on daily activities and strategies to maximize communication in the individual’s unique environments.

Personal Interests

Distance running, travel, and spending time with friends and family.

Medical School

Doctorate, University of Washington

Board Certifications

Board Certified in Audiology

Languages:

English

Professional Associations:

Fellow of the American Academy of Audiology (AAA), Board Member of the Washington State Academy of Audiology (WSAA).

Awards:

Future Leaders of Audiology Conference, 2010 Carrell-Miner Clinical Achievement Award, 2005

Board Certified in Audiology

Why do hearing aids cost so much?

Some may be reluctant to pursue amplification based on comments from friends and relatives reporting that hearing aids are “expensive”.  These statements can be misleading.  The costs associated with amplification upon the initial fitting can sound intimidating, but it is important to consider that the average life expectancy of a pair of hearing aids is 5 to 7 years.  Breaking down the cost of amplification over this period is often comparable to a monthly cell phone or cable television bill. 

The costs associated with a hearing aid fitting include not only the device itself but also the professional skills and time associated with appropriately fitting the device through verification and follow-up. Verification refers to measurements made to determine that the hearing aids meet a set of standards which includes volume, output, cosmetic appeal, and physical comfort. Using evidence-based practices, real-ear measurements are obtained using a small microphone placed in the ear with the hearing aid to ensure that appropriate volume is provided for different signals (such as speech). If earmolds or custom hearing aids are ordered, it is necessary to ensure that their characteristics (type of tubing, venting, style and material) are appropriate for the degree of hearing loss and physical characteristics of the ear.

Hearing aids are available in a wide range of makes and models, and a hearing aid solution that works for one person may not work for another.  Additional costs include ...

Having trouble understanding television dialogue? Assistive Listening Devices can help!

Understanding television dialogue can be challenging when one has hearing loss.

Some report that a program’s soundtrack in the background can obscure the dialogue. Others report difficulty understanding fast talkers and speakers with accents while watching TV. Still others state that they feel as if the newscaster is mumbling while delivering the evening broadcast. Some choose to increase the volume on the television to compensate. This can result in discomfort for those living in the same home.

Understanding speech on television can present some challenges because the two dimensional projection on the screen limits lip reading cues that are easily identified in person. Additionally, the actors’ mouths may not synchronize with the dialogue which can pose additional challenges.

Some people may continue to experience challenges listening to TV despite wearing hearing aids. This may be a result of the degree of hearing loss and the brain’s ability to process speech. Hearing aids and amplification help, but sometimes additional devices know as Assistive Listening Devices (also known as ALDs) can also be used to enhance understanding:

No One is Too Young for a Hearing Test!

How young is too young for a hearing test?

Your child is never too young for a hearing test! Different ages require special considerations, but children of all ages can have their hearing tested. Most children born in Washington State receive a hearing test before being discharged from the hospital.

Hearing tests are painless and encouraged for all newborns. According to statistics, approximately 3 in 1000 births will result in permanent hearing loss. Additionally, chronic ear infections, speech and language concerns and some illnesses and infections may lead your child to need a test.

You may remember having your hearing screened as a child at school. Hearing tests have come a long way from the traditional method of wearing headphones and raising a hand in response to a tone! Hearing is assessed using different tools and techniques based on the age of a child...

October is National Protect Your Hearing Month!

Noise exposure causes permanent hearing loss, and it is 100% preventable!

Hearing loss from noise exposure can occur at any age. Over 36 million Americans experience hearing loss… an amount over four times larger than the entire population of New York City! Over 18 million of those Americans with hearing loss are under the age of 65.

Today’s modern world is full of everyday objects that emit hazardous levels of noise. Exposure to noise louder than 85 dB is considered loud enough to potentially damage hearing. Consider your exposure to these common sounds that exceed 85 dB:

  • 90 dB: Hair dryer, lawn mower
  • 100 dB: MP3 Player at full volume
  • 110 dB: Concerts and sporting events
  • 130 dB: Ambulance

Your hearing can be permanently damaged after exposure from a single event of loud noise. Signs of damage from noise exposure include ringing in the ears, a plugged or “cotton feeling” in the ears and feeling as if others are mumbling while speaking. The use of some medications may make some individuals more susceptible to noise induced hearing loss.

You can prevent damage from noise by limiting your exposure to loud sounds. The following actions can reduce the likelihood of developing hearing loss from noise:

What is this ringing noise in my ears?

Tinnitus is the perception of a sound or noise in the ear or head.  Tinnitus is commonly reported as a ringing or bell noise, but it has also been described as clicking, roaring, hissing, static and “motor” noises. Tinnitus has unique variations, and reports from those afflicted with tinnitus vary greatly in terms of the sound and volume. Most people experience tinnitus in both ears, though it may occasionally be perceived in one ear only.

Some tinnitus coping strategies include:

Advocate for your listening needs!

Assertive listening strategies for those with hearing loss to share with others to facilitate communication.

Hearing loss is “invisible,” and those around you may not realize that you are missing part or all of a conversation. Acknowledging your hearing loss and educating others about your listening needs will facilitate successful communication. Many are unaware of strategies that can improve communication. Education and gentle reminders to use strategies are helpful to improve communication.

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Offices

Otolaryngology - First Hill
600 Broadway
Suite 200
Seattle, WA 98122
Phone: 206-215-1770
Fax: 206-215-1771
Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

Map & Directions

Otolaryngology - Issaquah
751 N.E. Blakely Dr.
5th Floor
Issaquah, WA 98029
Phone: 425-313-7089

Map & Directions

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