Bob Resta
Robert Resta, MS, Genetic Counseling

Robert Resta, MS, Genetic Counseling

Robert Resta, MS, Genetic Counseling
Specialty

Oncology - Medical: Swedish Cancer Institute

Clinical Interests / Special Procedures Performed

Genetic Counseling, Genetic Disorders in Hematology, Genetic Disorders in Oncology

  • Accepting Children: Unknown
  • Accepting New Patients: Yes
  • Accepting Medicare: Unknown
  • Accepting Medicaid/DSHS: Unknown
Insurance Accepted:

Contact this office for accepted insurance plans.

Additional Information:

APPOINTMENTS & COMMITTEES

Director, Hereditary Cancer Clinic, Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center (2006-Present)
Director of Genetic Counseling Services, Division of Perinatal Medicine, Swedish Medical Center (1983-2005)
Conference Co-Chair, NSGC Annual Education Conference, San Francisco, October 1996
Editorial Board, American Journal of Medical Genetics, 1995-Present
Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Genetic Counseling, 1995-2001
Editorial Board, Journal of Genetic Counseling, 1991-1995
Co-Chair, Genetic Counseling Definition Task Force, National Society of Genetic Counselors. 2003-2005.
Committee Member, Annual Education Conference Sub-Committee of the Education Committee, National Society of Genetic Counselors, 1996-1997
Committee Member, National Society of Genetic Counselors Task Force on the Standardization of the Family Pedigree, 1992-1996; 2007-2008

AWARDS

2010 – Nils Johanson Insiprational Award for Respect, Caring, and Compassion, Swedish Medical Center
2008 - Top Doctors 2008 - Seattle Metropolitan Magazine
2000 - The Galton Lecturer. Annual award given by the Galton Society (London) for contributions to the study of human genetics.
1994 - Regional Leadership Award, National Society of Genetic Counselors Region VI, in recognition of outstanding achievement and leadership in genetic counseling

Philosophy of Care

Nondirective, Supportive, Empower and educate patients,

Medical School

University of California, Irvine

Board Certifications

Genetic Counseling

Professional Associations:

National Society of Genetic Counselors

Additional Information:

APPOINTMENTS & COMMITTEES

Director, Hereditary Cancer Clinic, Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center (2006-Present)
Director of Genetic Counseling Services, Division of Perinatal Medicine, Swedish Medical Center (1983-2005)
Conference Co-Chair, NSGC Annual Education Conference, San Francisco, October 1996
Editorial Board, American Journal of Medical Genetics, 1995-Present
Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Genetic Counseling, 1995-2001
Editorial Board, Journal of Genetic Counseling, 1991-1995
Co-Chair, Genetic Counseling Definition Task Force, National Society of Genetic Counselors. 2003-2005.
Committee Member, Annual Education Conference Sub-Committee of the Education Committee, National Society of Genetic Counselors, 1996-1997
Committee Member, National Society of Genetic Counselors Task Force on the Standardization of the Family Pedigree, 1992-1996; 2007-2008

AWARDS

2010 – Nils Johanson Insiprational Award for Respect, Caring, and Compassion, Swedish Medical Center
2008 - Top Doctors 2008 - Seattle Metropolitan Magazine
2000 - The Galton Lecturer. Annual award given by the Galton Society (London) for contributions to the study of human genetics.
1994 - Regional Leadership Award, National Society of Genetic Counselors Region VI, in recognition of outstanding achievement and leadership in genetic counseling

PUBLICATIONS
Resta R (2010) Complicated shadows: A critique of autonomy in genetic counseling practice. Chapter in Genetic Counseling Advanced Practice Text. Leroy BS, McCarthy Veach P, Bartels DB (eds). New York: John Wiley & Sons. pp. 13-30

Resta R (2009) Unprepared, Understaffed, and Unplanned: Thoughts on the Practical Implications of Discovering New Breast and Ovarian Cancer Causing Genes. Journal of Genetic Counseling. 18: 521-523.

Bennett RL, Steinhaus K, Resta RG, Doyle DL (2008) Standardized human pedigree nomenclature: Update an assessment of the recommendations of the National Society of Genetic Counselors. Journal of Genetic Counseling 17:424-433.

Resta RG (2007) Relative risk: The role of the pedigree in cancer management and risk assessment. Oncology Issues Sept/Oct: 46-48.

Resta R (2006) Defining and redefining genetic counseling and its scope. American Journal of Medical Genetics, Seminars in Medical Genetics. 142C:269-275.

Resta R, Biesecker BB, Bennett RL, Blum S, Estabrooks Hahn S, Strecker M, Williams J (The National Society of Genetic Counselors’ Definition Task Force) (2006) A new definition of genetic counseling: National Society of Genetic Counselors’ Task Force Report. Journal of Genetic Counseling 15:77-83.

Resta R (2005) The changing demographics of Advanced Maternal Age (AMA) and the impact on the predicted incidence of Down syndrome in the United States: Implications for prenatal screening and genetic counseling. American Journal of Medical Genetics 133A:31-36.

Resta R (2002) Historical aspects of genetic counseling: Why was maternal age 35 chosen as the cut-off for offering amniocentesis? Medicina nei secoli 14(3):793-811.

Resta R (2001) Genetic counseling: Its scope and limitations. Chapter in A Century of Mendelism, RA Peel and J Timson eds, published by the Galton Institute (London), pp. 26-44.

Resta R (editor) (2000) Psyche and Helix: Essays on Psychological Aspects of Genetic Counseling by Seymour Kessler. John Wiley and Sons: New York.

Resta RG (1996) Genetic counseling: Coping with the human impact of genetic disease. Written as Part of the Access Excellence/Classic Collection, sponsored by Genentech, Inc., for the Internet, see: http://www.accessexcellence.org/AE/AEC/CC/counseling_background.html

Resta RG (1993) The crane's foot - the rise of the pedigree in human genetics. J Genetic Counseling 2:235-260.

Resta RG (1992) The twisted helix: An essay on genetic counselors, eugenics and social responsibility. J Genetic Counseling 1:227-44.

Columns
Resta RG – Regular contributor to blog The DNA Exchange (thednaexchange.com)

Resta RG - "The Historical Perspective", column examining how historical factors have shaped the current practice of genetic counseling, published periodically in Journal of Genetic Counseling.

ABSTRACTS, PRESENTATIONS, POSTERS
Resta R. Genetics and The Community: Goals, Achievements, Unanticipated Consequences. Beth Fine Kaplan Memorial Lecture, Genetic Counseling Program, Northwestern University Medical Center, Chicago, WA, March 11, 2011.

Pocobelli G, Chubak J, Buist D, Hanson N, Drescher C, Resta R, Urban N. Rates of Prophylactic Oophorectomy Before And After The Introduction of A Clinical Practice Guideline on The Referral of High-risk Women to Genetic Counseling. Presented at annual meeting of the American Society of Preventive Oncology, March 5-8, 2011. Las Vegas, Nevada.

Resta R, Stern Alexandra Minna. Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Autonomy in Genetic Counseling. Presented at the 29th Annual Education Conference of the National Society of Genetic Counselors, October 17, 2010, Dallas, Texas.

Resta R, Murphy SAR. Discussion Panel – The Genetic Testing Frontier: Impact on Clinical Care & Marketing Opportunities. On-line Conference for Hospital Administrators, sponsored by The Advisory Board (Washington, DC; www.advisory.com). March 25, 2008.

Resta R. Complicated Shadows: A Critique of Autonomy in Genetic Counseling. Presented at the Annual Conference of the Human Genetics Society of Australasia, Auckland, New Zealand, July 18, 2007.

Resta R. Staged Modified Risk Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy (SMRRSO): A Proposed Alternative Surgery for Reducing Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA Mutation Positive Women . Presented at the Annual Education Conference of the Australasian Society of Genetic Counselors, Auckland, New Zealand, July 15, 2007.

Resta R. Looking for Genes in All the Right Places: Who Should Have Genetic Testing and Why. Presented at Annual Oncology Symposium, Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA. April 20, 2007.

Resta R. Genetic Testing: Elements of a High-Risk Hereditary Cancer Program. Presented at Annual National Meeting of the Association of Community Cancer Centers, Baltimore, MD. March 29, 2007.

Resta R. Panel Discussion: Affording the Technology of Quality Cancer Care. Presented at Annual National Meeting of the Association of Community Cancer Centers, Baltimore, MD. March 29, 2007.

Resta R. Historical Aspects Of Genetic Counseling: Why Was Maternal Age 35 Chosen As The Cut-Off For Offering Amniocentesis. Presented at Genetics and Biotechnology in Medicine: Scientific, Ethical, Historical, Legal, and Economic Issues. Conference sponsored by Bioetica Enaudi at University of Rome La Sapienza, Rome, Italy, October 25-26, 2002.

Resta R.Genetic Counselling: Its Scope and Limitations. The Galton Lecture 2000, presented at A Century of Mendelism sponsored by the Galton Institute at The Linnean Society of London, Sept. 21, 2000.

Resta R. Social, Ethical and Technical Implications of Pedigree Construction: What the Maps Tell Us About the Mapmakers. Presented at Human Pedigree Studies, a conference sponsored by The Galton Institute at the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine, London, England, September 17, 1998.

Resta R. Genetic Counseling Is Eugenic Except for When It's Not. Presented at Eugenic Thought and Practice: A Reappraisal Towards the End of the Twentieth Century, sponsored by The Van Leer Institute and Tel Aviv University, Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, May 28, 1997.

BRCA Genetic Testing for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer

In today’s New York Times, actress and director Angelina Jolie bravely and openly discusses her experience with BRCA genetic testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer:

The 37 year old Ms. Jolie – who has not had cancer – underwent genetic testing because of her family history of cancer. She was found to carry a mutation in the BRCA1 gene, which puts her at significant risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers. Ms. Jolie, the mother of 3 adopted and 3 biological children, elected to undergo a risk-reducing double mastectomy, and plans to have her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed soon to lower her risk of developing ovarian cancer.

Ms. Jolie’s story opens a public conversation about the importance of genetic testing in helping to reduce a woman’s risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers. This very personal decision about mastectomy by someone widely regarded as one of the most beautiful women in the movies also helps women recognize that their body image and sexuality does not have to be defined by their breasts. Not every woman will make the decision to have major surgery, but genetic test results can also make sure that your breast cancer screening is appropriate for your level of risk; women who carry a BRCA gene mutation need ...

Misconceptions & Misunderstandings About Genetic Testing For Hereditary Cancer: My family history of cancer almost guarantees that one day I will develop cancer

Many people who have a family history of cancer often assume that they are at high risk of developing cancer and do not see the value of genetic counseling and genetic testing. The reasoning often goes like this:

“My mother, my cousin, and my grandmother all had breast cancer. I know there is a very high chance that I will develop it too. I would never have a mastectomy, so I am extra good about getting mammograms and my doctor checks my breasts every time I see her. I have a healthy diet, exercise regularly, rarely drink alcohol, and I have never put a cigarette to my lips. Since I am already doing everything I can possibly do, I don’t see how genetic counseling and genetic testing can help me.”

Of course, it is a good idea to be conscientious about your medical care, and everyone should maintain a healthy lifestyle, regardless of family history. The questions that genetic testing may answer for you are:

Misconceptions & Misunderstandings About Genetic Testing For Hereditary Cancer: Don’t Test Me, Test My Family!

As a genetic counselor with 30 years of experience, I have met with many families who have been concerned about their hereditary risks to develop cancer and other disorders. I have found that the complexity of genetics can sometimes cause misunderstandings about some critical information.

A common question that patients ask is this: I already have cancer, it makes no sense for me to have genetic testing, so why don’t you test my family instead?

As it turns out, the best strategy for most families is to for genetic testing to start with a relative who has already been diagnosed with cancer.

  1. If that person has a normal genetic test result, there is usually no need to test any other healthy family members.
  2. Because of the complicated nature of cancer genetics, accurate interpretation of a negative result usually requires an affected relative to have a positive genetic test.
  3. If a patient has a positive genetic test, the cost of testing all other family members will usually be considerably less expensive and increases the likelihood that health insurers will cover the test.

Let’s clarify this with a specific example.

Three sisters, all in their 30s, want to undergo genetic testing because their mother is a breast cancer survivor, and ...

Genetic Counseling: What It Means for Cancer Patients And Their Families

Genetic counseling can assure patients and their at-risk family members that they are getting the appropriate  cancer treatment, screening, and prevention.

Why do some women develop breast cancer while others do not? Why does a man get diagnosed with colon cancer at age 41 while his brother lives cancer-free well into his 90s? There are many reasons why people get cancer but for some families genetics can play a critical role in determining cancer risk, and genetic counseling can help answer these questions.

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Offices

True Family Women's Cancer Center
1221 Madison St.
5th Floor
Seattle, WA 98104
Phone: 206-386-2552

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