Swedish News

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Infectious disease protocols in place at Swedish

October 07, 2014

Swedish, like all U.S. hospitals, is prepared to follow Centers for Disease Control’s infectious disease recommendations and protocols. Due to recent infectious disease events, Swedish is increasing its use of screening measures to identify potential cases of infectious disease. These include:

  • Identifying a patient’s recent travel history
  • Diagnosing any physical symptoms a patient may be experiencing

If patients are identified to be at risk of having or spreading an infectious disease, Swedish caregivers are prepared to follow appropriate protocols, which may include patient isolation, distribution of appropriate protective equipment for caregivers and patients, restricting visitation and implementing environmental infection control measures. Disease testing only occurs after a screening threshold is met and the patient is identified as a risk.

Swedish Neuroscience Institute performs focused ultrasound procedure to treat metastatic brain tumor

October 01, 2014

Study is one of three trials at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle examining novel technology’s treatment potential

SEATTLE — Oct. 1, 2014 — Surgeons from the Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) in Seattle have used focused ultrasound waves to noninvasively treat a metastatic brain tumor. The procedure was performed by Swedish neurosurgeon Stephen Monteith, M.D. and assisted by Charles Cobbs, M.D. and is part of an early stage clinical trial examining the novel technology.

The trial is one of three ongoing studies being conducted by SNI to evaluate the use of focused ultrasound – a technology traditionally associated with imaging and diagnostic procedures – for the noninvasive treatment of neurological disorders. The brain tumors trial, along with separate clinical trials examining focused ultrasound for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor, make SNI one of the nation’s leading research centers for the study of focused ultrasound.

Seattle brain cancer walk raises $530,000 for brain cancer research

September 26, 2014

Funds will advance the search for new treatment options and improve patient care

SEATTLE — Sept. 26, 2014 — More than 3,000 walkers filled Seattle Center’s Next 50 Plaza on Sept. 20 for the 7th Annual Seattle Brain Cancer Walk. The walk raised more than $530,000, with 100 percent of the funds supporting research at the Ben & Catherine Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute (Ivy Center).

“The Seattle Brain Cancer Walk is an opportunity to celebrate the patients and families who are all affected by this devastating disease,” said Charles Cobbs, M.D., medical director of the Ivy Center. “The funds raised will make a direct impact on our research at the Ivy Center, and will help us push toward breakthroughs to better treat, and hopefully cure this disease.”

Internationally renowned hepatologist, researcher named director of Swedish liver care network

September 25, 2014

Kris Kowdley, M.D., also named research director of the Swedish Organ Care Program

SEATTLE — Sept. 25, 2014 —Internationally renowned physician and researcher Kris V. Kowdley, M.D., FACP, FACG, AGAF and AASLD Fellow has joined the Swedish Liver Center’s medical staff as Director of the Swedish Liver Care Network and Research Director of the Organ Care Program. Dr. Kowdley will provide transplant and liver care for patients while continuing his groundbreaking research into Hepatitis C. Dr. Kowdley’s first day at Swedish was Sept. 15.

“We are delighted to welcome Dr. Kowdley to the Swedish Liver Center medical staff,” said Marquis Hart, M.D., director of the Swedish Organ Transplant Program. “Dr. Kowdley’s ambitious research is giving hope to patients with serious liver disease and we are excited to extend his care to our patients.”

Prior to Swedish, Dr. Kowdley served as the director of the Liver Center of Excellence and the director of research at the Digestive Disease Institute at Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle.

Swedish caregivers recognized as Top Doctors and Nurse Practitioners

September 15, 2014

Dozens of Swedish caregivers were recently recognized by Seattle Metropolitan magazine’s annual Top Doctors and Nurse Practitioners feature.

The 2014 rankings include nearly 50 Swedish caregivers and draws from peer endorsements of more than 1,400 doctors, nurses and physician assistants in the Seattle metropolitan area. Nearly 13,000 nominations were narrowed down by an anonymous advisory panel. The panel’s criteria included such items as years of experience, competency, patient rapport and satisfaction and compliance with care recommendations.

Below you will find a list of Swedish providers recognized with this year’s top honor. A complete list of providers can also be found online.

KING 5, PSBJ cover Swedish's Level IV NICU designation

September 11, 2014

KING 5’s Teresa Yuan reports on Swedish’s newly designated Level IV neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), one of only two serving the region. The NICU is located at Swedish’s First Hill hospital in Seattle.

Last week Puget Sound Business Journal reporter Greg Lamm covered the new designation.

Read the PSBJ story here.

Olaparib tablet safe in pretreated ovarian cancer patients; More effective in those with BRCA mutations

September 09, 2014

American Association for Cancer Research News Release

SEATTLE — Sept. 9, 2014 — An oral tablet form of a PARP inhibitor, olaparib, given in combination with chemotherapy, was safe in heavily pretreated ovarian cancer patients, and patients with BRCA mutations may have a better response compared with those without a BRCA mutation, according to phase Ib clinical trial data presented at the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research-AACR 10th Biennial Ovarian Cancer Research Symposium, held Sept. 8-9.

“This study is one of the first studies to use olaparib tablets instead of olaparib capsules,” said Saul Rivkin, MD, founder and chairman of the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research, and a research scientist at the Swedish Cancer Institute, both in Seattle, Washington. “The goal was to find the maximum tolerated dose of olaparib tablets plus weekly metronomic carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with relapsed ovarian cancer.

KOMO 4 Covers Swedish 'POEM' Procedure

September 09, 2014

KOMO 4’s Molly Shen tells viewers about a new procedure being offered at Swedish Medical Center. Per oral endoscopic myotomy (also known as ‘POEM’) is only being offered in Washington State at Swedish.

View the clip on KOMO 4 here.

Swedish Cancer Institute launches new hematologic malignancies program

September 08, 2014

International hematology expert Dr. John Pagel recruited to expand Swedish’s treatment for, and research on, blood cancers

SEATTLE — September 8, 2014 — The Swedish Cancer Institute is launching a Hematologic Malignancies program for the expanded treatment and research of blood-based cancers such as leukemia, multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Newly recruited international hematology expert John Pagel, M.D., Ph.D., will serve as chief of the new program, which launches this month.

“Dr. Pagel brings with him a world-class reputation for research and excellence in patient care,” said Swedish Cancer Institute Executive Director Thomas Brown, M.D. “This new program will add to our existing strengths in caring for patients with hematologic malignancies and further develop our autologous hematopoietic stem cell program. These efforts allow the Swedish Cancer Institute to continue providing the most versatile and comprehensive cancer care in the Pacific Northwest.”

Dr. Pagel’s practice will include caring for patients with acute and chronic leukemias, multiple myeloma, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, and myelodysplastic syndromes, as well as other myeloproliferative disorders. In addition to providing established treatments such as autologous stem cell transplants, the program will develop novel therapies for the treatment of blood-based diseases through research collaborations and studies initiated by Swedish Cancer Institute physicians.

Swedish provides Washington's first "POEM" procedure

September 05, 2014

Per oral endoscopic myotomy could help a range of esophageal, stomach disorders

SEATTLE — September 05, 2014— Swedish surgeons became the first in Washington State to perform a per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) procedure when they successfully treated a 36-year-old patient diagnosed with a rare esophageal disorder known as achalasia.