Ralph W. Aye, M.D. FACS

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Patient Story: Anti-Reflux Surgery Cures 30 Years of GERD Symptoms

May 11, 2015

"I began experiencing heartburn symptoms in my mid-thirties and was in my forties when I first had GERD issues.  My symptoms were aggravated greatly with menopause and grew progressively worse as the years went along.  By the time I was 55 my reflux was something I dealt with when eating and drinking late at night.  If I went to a party and ate rich foods in the evening, I often woke up a few hours after falling asleep with acid shooting up from my stomach and getting trapped in my throat..."

Surgical treatment options for GERD

July 05, 2013

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common disorder of the upper gastrointestinal track.  It's estimated that up to 40% of Americans take some form of anti-acid medication at least once a month, making it one of the most commonly used types of medication in the world. 

Heartburn is simply a burning sensation behind the breast bone, and is not necessarily from GERD.  It can be caused by a variety of other disorders, including heart disease, musculoskeletal disorders, and disorders of other parts of the gastrointestinal track, including the stomach, pancreas, gall bladder, liver, or intestine A simple way to differentiate GERD from heartburn is to take antacids or over the counter acid suppressants.  There are two classes of acid suppressants: H2 blockers like ranitidine/zantac; and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) like prilosec/omeprazole.  If the symptom partially or completely responds, it is likely caused by stomach acid, particularly

Lung Cancer Screening

November 21, 2011

We screen for breast cancer with mammography, colon cancer with colonoscopy, and prostate cancer with blood tests and exams – why not lung cancer?

If you’re a smoker or a former smoker, or even if you’ve had significant second-hand smoke exposure, you’ve probably worried about your chances of getting lung cancer, and whether there is anything you can do about it. Perhaps you even asked your doctor about getting an x-ray; he or she may have told you that there is no proof that it helps. That’s because a national study done years ago showed no benefit from getting chest X-rays, and therefore it’s not recommended.

The studies

However, since 2000, Swedish has participated in an international study – the International Early Lung Cancer Action Project (I-ELCAP) - to see whether CT scans or CAT scans – very highly detailed X-rays – might be able to find lung cancer earlier and improve cure rates. The study was begun by a group...