2013

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Wondering how a service dog may help you?

October 10, 2013

It’s our pleasure to announce that Buddy Hayes will be coming to the MS Center on October 21! Buddy is a motivational speaker who’s passionate about educating the public on the daily challenges that people with disabilities face and how they overcome them. She is a retired certified therapeutic recreation specialist as well as a veteran of the US Army.

Buddy has been living with multiple sclerosis for many years and she’s turned her diagnosis into an opportunity to change the way that the world perceives people with disabilities. Buddy has shown that she is not only an inspirational speaker, but she’s also unafraid to take on any challenge. Just a few of her many accomplishments include skiing, rock climbing, surfing, scuba diving, and winning the title of Ms. Wheelchai...

What causes bedwetting and when to be concerned

October 07, 2013

Bedwetting (also called nocturnal enuresis) is a very common childhood problem.  The number of children with this problem varies by age. For example, at five years of age, an average of 16% of children will have a bedwetting accident.  By 15 years of age and older, 1-2 % continue to wet the bed.  For most children, this will improve or resolve without any treatment as they get older.

What can cause bedwetting?

Bedwetting may be related to one or more of the following:

  • The child’s bladder holds a smaller than normal amount
  • Genetics (parents who had nocturnal enuresis as a child are more likely to have children with the same concern)
  • Diminished levels of vasopressin (a hormone that reduces urine production at night)
  • The mechanism for the bladder and brain to talk to each other is “off line”
  • Underlying medical/emotional concerns (i.e. diabetes, urinary tract infection, ADHD, etc)
  • ...

Tips for reducing hot flashes for women with breast cancer

October 05, 2013

Hot flashes are the most common complaint from women going through menopause. And for women who are breast cancer patients, the problem is often more acute. Surgery, chemotherapy and estrogen blocking medications can bring on hot flashes or make them worse if you already have them. And for women who must discontinue hormone replacement therapy, the instant onset of hot flashes and night sweats can severely impact quality of life.

Fortunately, there are several strategies you can easily and safely employ to decrease the severity and frequency of hot flashes and night sweats. Everything I recommend here is non-estrogenic so while it is generally safe for breast cancer patients and survivors, you should always check with your oncologist before trying any new supplement.

First, a few notes on diet. I recently had a patient who stopped eating refined sugars for general health reasons, and her hot flashes nearly disappeared. Your mileage may vary on this one but there are c...

Swedish Digestive Health Network � call 1-855-411-MYGI (6944)

October 04, 2013

In the fall of 2011, Swedish opened the largest, most advanced endoscopy center in the Pacific Northwest. This state-of-the-art unit serves as the procedural space for a broad range of minimally invasive cases performed by gastroenterologists, colorectal specialists, thoracic and bariatric surgeons and pulmonologists on patients with a broad range of digestive and respiratory diseases.  As we celebrated this accomplishment, we were reminded of the complexity of digestive disease and that many times, patients and possibly even referring physicians aren’t sure of what type of specialist is best suited to a particular digestive problem.

There is nothing more distressing as a health care professional than hearing patient horror stories about trying to access care. A chronic illness can cause depression and discouragement; an acute illness or a cancer diagnosis can overwhelm the patient and the patient’s family with plenty of unknowns. 

To address these challenges, a ...

Feeding Tips for Picky Eaters

October 04, 2013

It is important that children develop healthy eating habits early in life. Here are some ways to help your child eat well and to make meal times easier.

What to Expect:

  • After the first year of life, growth slows down, and your child's appetite may change.
  • It's normal for your child to eat more on some days and very little on other days.
  • A child may refuse to eat in order to have some control in his life.
  • A child may be happy to sit at the table for 15 to 20 minutes and no longer.
  • A child may want to eat the same food over and over again.

How can I encourage my child to eat more?

  • Set regular meal and snack times. Avoid feeding your child in between these times, so that they are hungry at meal and snack times. If you want your child to eat dinner at the same time you do, try to time his snack-meals so that they are at least two hours before dinner.
  • Limit juice and ...

New MS therapy approved by the European Commission

October 03, 2013

On September 17, the European Commission, the European equivalent of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), approved the release of alemtuzumab (Lemtrada™.)

Alemtuzumab is an intravenous monoclonal antibody that selectively reduces circulating T lymphocytes, which are thought to be involved in inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS). This reduction is followed by repopulation of T and B cells over time. It is administered on five consecutive days in the first year of therapy, followed by three consecutive days 12 months later.

Swedish Neuroscience Institute was involved in Care-MS II, one of the pivotal Phase III studies in which MS patients who had relapsed on other therapies were randomized to either alemtuzumab or interferon beta-1a. The drug was found to be significantly ...

Advocating for Your Child with Hearing Loss in the Classroom

October 02, 2013

By now, the new school year is in full swing.  And while it might have started with newly made memories of a great summer, it may also bring new challenges—a new classroom, a new teacher, a new setting.  All parents want the same thing for their children—to be safe, healthy, happy and successful.  But the latter can be more challenging in the educational setting for children with hearing loss of any level.  So, as a parent, how do you ensure that your child with hearing loss succeeds in the classroom?

  1. Understand the impact of hearing loss on learning, and how to manipulate the classroom on your child’s behalf.  Hearing loss, even a minimal degree, can have a significant impact on learning.  Request preferential seating for your child.  Sitting closer to the teacher will help improve the signal-to-noise ratio (or how loud the teacher’s voice is relative to background noises).  This will help make listening and learning...

Team Swedish Bikes for Multiple Sclerosis

October 01, 2013

The Swedish S’myelin Babes, Swedish’s Bike MS team, raised more than $46,000 this year. The annual event raises funds for multiple sclerosis research and local programs to support people living with the disease.

Check out a few photos captured by Dr. Lily JungHenson from this year’s event:

Cancer Awareness and Community Events

September 27, 2013

Nearly every month of the year has been recognized as a cancer-related awareness month. Cancer awareness months provide the perfect opportunity to share information about specific types of cancer in order to increase knowledge about symptoms, screenings and treatment options, to reduce the stigma of cancer, and to help raise funds for cancer research.

Whether you show your support by wearing a cancer awareness color or ribbon, discuss cancer-related information with family members and friends, or attend a community event or fundraiser, your voice counts. We encourage you to help spread the word and express the importance of education, prevention, early detection and treatment:

Brain Aneurysm Awareness: Spreading the Word

September 25, 2013

September is National Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month and across the country, those affected by various forms of the disease raise awareness through fundraising and visibility events. Bringing a voice to the disease may seem daunting in a sea of awareness ribbons and weekend community walks—but  Swedish had the opportunity to focus a spotlight on Seattle as host for the Brain Aneurysm Foundation’s Annual Symposium. This Massachusetts-based organization is the nation’s only not-for-profit profit organization solely dedicated to providing critical awareness, education, support and research funding to reduce the incidence of brain aneurysms. Swedish Neuroscience Institute physicians teamed up with other elite physicians from across the country and others in the medical community, in addition to volunteers and Brain Aneurysm Foundation members to learn more about advances in research for the disease.

One unique component to this important event was the attendance of members ...