Swedish News Blog

New MS therapy approved by the European Commission

Lily K. Jung Henson, MD

On September 17, the European Commission, the European equivalent of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), approved the release of alemtuzumab (Lemtrada™.)

Alemtuzumab is an intravenous monoclonal antibody that selectively reduces circulating T lymphocytes, which are thought to be involved in inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS). This reduction is followed by repopulation of T and B cells over time. It is administered on five consecutive days in the first year of therapy, followed by three consecutive days 12 months later.

Swedish Neuroscience Institute was involved in Care-MS II, one of the pivotal Phase III studies in which MS patients who had relapsed on other therapies were randomized to either alemtuzumab or interferon beta-1a. The drug was found to be significantly ...

Team Swedish Bikes for Multiple Sclerosis

Kate Floyd

Kate Floyd
Education Coordinator, Swedish MS Center

The Swedish S’myelin Babes, Swedish’s Bike MS team, raised more than $46,000 this year. The annual event raises funds for multiple sclerosis research and local programs to support people living with the disease.

Check out a few photos captured by Dr. Lily JungHenson from this year’s event:

Proteomics identifies protein changes in multiple sclerosis and CIS

James D. Bowen, MD

A recent study published in the journal PLOS ONE found differences in protein levels of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) among people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and clinically isolated syndrome (CIS).

Using the relatively new field of proteomics, researchers were able to identify each individual protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)—86 total—and compares their levels among people with relapsing MS, clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and healthy individuals. People with RRMS had different levels of 20 proteins compared to people with CIS. Seventy five percent of those proteins related to neurons (rather than myelin). Changes were particularly notable for proteins related to neurons in participants with CIS.

This study is one of many MS studies coming from the relatively new field of proteomics. This field uses ...

No-Cook Meals for Multiple Sclerosis - Week 4: Southwest Chop Salad

Jessica Bratrude, RD

Jessica Bratrude, RD
Nutritionist, Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center

It may be the last official week of summer, but this no-cook meal for multiple sclerosis can be enjoyed during any season. This salad’s simple ingredients are available year-round. Make it now and enjoy it again when you need a break from winter weather.

Recipe: Southwest Chop Salad

 

Super Food: Avocado

The oleic acid in avocados will help keep you satisfied and full. Oleic acid tells the body to ...

Amazing Race host and multiple sclerosis advocate Phil Koeghan visits Swedish

Kate Floyd

Kate Floyd
Education Coordinator, Swedish MS Center

 

The Multiple Sclerosis Center at Swedish had a unique visitor last week: Phil Koeghan, host of the Amazing Race (or road warrior for FOX Breakfast Time if you were a mid-90s morning talk show fan).

Phil and his wife, Louise, came by for a tour Friday afternoon and met with some of the Swedish MS Center staff. They were visiting Seattle with their professional bike team to participate in the Multiple Sclerosis Society’s local Bike MS event.

Phil’s team rode Saturday among 135 other teams and individual cyclists, including the Swedish S’Myelin Babes. Swedish’s Bike MS team rallied more than 60 teammates to raise more than $42,300 to support research and advocacy efforts within the MS community.

No-Cook Meals for Multiple Sclerosis - Week 3: Tuna and Fennel Sandwiches

Jessica Bratrude, RD

Jessica Bratrude, RD
Nutritionist, Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center

It’s back-to-school time and this week’s no-cook meal for multiple sclerosis is a twist on an American childhood mainstay; the tuna fish sandwich. Instead of mayonnaise and pickles, this meal uses flavorful olive oil, tangy vinegar and fresh crunchy vegetables.

Recipe: Tuna and Fennel Sandwiches

 

Super food ingredient: Chunk light tuna

There is strong evidence that the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish can lower triglycerides and blood pressure. Make sure to choose “chunk light tuna,” which is three times lower in mercury than the solid white or albacore tuna.

Also choose water-packed tuna over oil packed. Some of the omega-3 fatty acids leak into the added oil and will be lost when you drain the can. Because water...

Is someone with multiple sclerosis an MSer?

Pavle Repovic, MD, PhD

A survey from the United Kingdom published in the Journal of MS and Related Disorders polled 396 people with multiple sclerosis (MS) about how they would like to be referred to in conversation. The winning term ("MSer") was supported by 43% of the respondents, while "person with MS" received 34% votes. When a United States-based blog reported on the story, 2 out of 3 respondents disagreed.

What do you think? Comment below with your preference and why.

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(Ed. note: You can comment anonymously - feel free to use your initials if you are more comfortable sharing that way.)

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