Swedish News Blog

A patient's experience with the Swedish Digestive Health Network

Dana Lewis

Dana Lewis
Digital Media & Internal Communications | Swedish Blog Administrator

We recently received this post from a patient who asked us to share her story and her experiences with Dr. Schembre and Dr. Tschirhart with the Swedish Digestive Health Network. Thank you, Yevette, for sharing your story with us!

---
Dec 2nd,  2012 I was out of town doing some promotion for work when I collapsed in my hotel room. I went to the local hospital ER.  They found I had a gallstone lodged in my common bile duct. As they attempted to remove this, the surgeon ripped my intestine.  This created a whole host of life threatening problems. After 5 days I was airlifted to Swedish Medical Center in Seattle.  Dr. Tschirhart was assigned my case.  By June I was stable enough for surgery.  Dr. Schembre referred to this surgery as a “Leap of Faith”. There was a team of 4 surgeons involved in this surgery.  Their concern that I may not survive was apparent. I actually said goodbye to my 17 year old daughter before this surgery.  After having me in surgery for only a few minutes he told my family that he didn’t think there was anything he could do for me & that my insides look like paper mache and were very fragile. But he never gave up.  I ended up with 9 different drainage tubes in my abdomen along with a J tune, G tube, every tube possible I think.  When I drank, the fluid would go in and then come out several of the tubes.  Dr. Schembre from GI worked with Dr. Tschirhart to help make my treatment plans. In October I was in a better situation to endure another surgery. Dr. Tschirhart explained exactly what needed to be done & explained the “Best Case Scenario” that he hoped he could perform. Fortunately he was able to achieve what he set out to do.   I ended up with 3 major surgeries and countless procedures.

Finally in December of 2013 they wanted me to go to rehab but I insisted on recovering at home in Marysville. I felt if there was a chance I was not going to make it I wanted to die at home.  Dr. Tschirhart assured me that if I had trouble and had to go to my local hospital he would have me airlifted immediately back to Swedish. As soon as I got home and on my couch I felt better!  I was discharged Dec 18, 2013 after a total of 381 days in the hospital.

Recently (August of 2014) I was able to return to work and can drive too!  I did have trouble this past April when my side split open and went into Swedish ER.  I commented to my friend that I needed to call Dr. Tschirhart so he could come get me.  The intake gal overheard me and said doctors never do that.  I tried to tell her that Dr. Tschirhart would. The ER was trying to gather info as to what had happened to me. My situation is too much to explain so I kept referring them to my file.  I was very frustrated. As they were questioning me I saw this hand come through the door and slowly he walked in. There he was!  I instantly started crying. He immediately had me transferred up to the 10th floor, order CT, medication etc.  He came for me as promised. I knew he would.
 

Dr. Tshirhart always told me  ....

What you can do about nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Carolyn Anderson, ARNP

Carolyn Anderson, ARNP
Swedish Gastroenterology

Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is a term used to describe the presence of fat accumulation in the liver. NAFLD affects approximately 20-30% of United States population, and is most commonly diagnosed between 40 – 50 years of age. Recent studies have shown an even distribution of NAFLD between men and women.
 
A healthy liver may contain some fat. However, NAFLD occurs when the liver has trouble breaking down fats, causing excess fat to build-up in the liver. Mild fat accumulation usually does not result in inflammation of the liver. More severe fat accumulation can cause inflammation, and potential progression to cirrhosis (scarring of liver tissue). People who drink too much alcohol can get a condition similar to NAFLD, but NAFLD happens in people who do not drink alcohol or only a little alcohol.
 
We still have much to learn about the specific cause of NAFLD, but it is often associated with:

How to deal with gas and bloating

Margaret Gorham, ARNP
We all have occasional gas, usually from something we have eaten, but many people feel that they pass too much gas or burp too frequently. Intestinal gas can result in abdominal pain, bloating and embarrassment.
 
The amount of gas produced by the body depends upon your diet and other factors. Most people with symptoms of excessive gas do not produce more gas than the average person, but are more aware of normal amounts of gas.
 
Where does the gas come from?

What is inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)?

Karlee J. Ausk, MD

Karlee J. Ausk, MD
Gastroenterologist

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic (i.e. long-lasting) inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal system.  IBD is often confused with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) because of their similar acronyms, but the two conditions are not related.  IBD affects approximately 1.4 million Americans and is most commonly diagnosed between 15-40 years of age.
 
IBD can be categorized into ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease.  Though there are clear differences between the two, they are closely related and sometimes difficult to distinguish.
 
Ulcerative colitis is a condition where inflammation affects the most superficial layer of the large intestine (colon).  It typically starts at the rectum and can involve a varying amount of the colon.  In contrast, the inflammation of Crohn’s disease can affect all layers of the intestine and can involve any area of the gastrointestinal tract – from the mouth to the anus.  The type of inflammation seen in Crohn’s disease may lead to long-term complications such as strictures or fistulas (abnormal connections to other organs) that are typically not  ...

Why aren't my bowel habits normal?

Genee Holtzman, ARNP
Do you have irregular, uncomfortable, or distressing bowel habits? Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is the most common gastrointestinal condition affecting an estimated 15% of the general population.  It is most common among women aged 30 to 49 years old.

IBS is a chronic condition of the digestive system that is not generally associated with more concerning findings of anemia, weight loss, family history of colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, or celiac disease. Symptoms of IBS include abdominal discomfort, constipation and diarrhea. Despite extensive research, no common cause of IBS has been identified. Some theories include:

FDA finally defines gluten free

Uma Pisharody, MD, FAAP

Uma Pisharody, MD, FAAP
Pediatric Gastroenterologist

On August 5th, 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) at long last published a formal rule regulating the use of the term "gluten free" on foods and beverages.  Even though this came with a big sigh of relief to the millions of people with celiac disease living in the US, consumers should be aware that the law gives manufacturers one year to be in full compliance (and goes into effect August 5, 2014).

As we head into the final months before the law’s final compliance date, I thought I’d highlight a few other key points about this brand new law:

1. No symbols needed.  The law does not require or recommend manufacturers use any particular symbol or food label, but if a label should include any of the following phrases, compliance must be ensured:
    •    “Gluten-free”
    •    “Free of gluten”
    •    “No gluten”
    •    “Without gluten”

2.  It’s voluntary.  A manufacturer may produce gluten-free foods, but just choose not to label them as such.   

3.  “Gluten-free” does not mean “zero gluten”. The new law defines "gluten-free" to mean that a food contains less than 20 parts per million (20 ppm) of gluten.  (This tiny amount can be visualized as less than a tenth of a grain of salt on a slice of bread, and is acceptable as the standard for people with celiac disease).

4.  As with any rule, there are exceptions.  Although ...

Pivotal time for chronic hepatitis C treatment

Trang Chau, ARNP

Trang Chau, ARNP
ARNP, Swedish Gastroenterology

An estimated 2.7-3.9 million people in the US are chronically infected with hepatitis C.*  Patients are often diagnosed incidentally, when they donate blood, get life insurance or get a routine physical exam with blood tests showing normal or abnormal liver enzymes.  They may have been diagnosed many years ago with non-A, non-B hepatitis, but forgot about it, never followed up, or did not mention it to their regular health care provider.  In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) issued additional recommendations to start screening “Baby Boomers,” those born between 1945-1965.  Though Baby Boomers account for 3.25% of the US population, they account for 3/4 of the hepatitis C infections.*

Patients may have seen a health care provider in the past and told that there is no treatment, that treatments were not effective, or not worthwhile due to side effects.  Patients have been reluctant to seek treatment because they have heard about the terrible side effects associated with treatment, including flu-like symptoms, fatigue, depression, muscle aches, rashes, etc, lasting up to a year. 

However, this is a pivotal time for hepatitis C patients because treatment has improved by leaps and bounds.  In late 2013, two ...
Results 1-7 of 18

More information about the Swedish newsroom

Explore the rest of the Swedish blog

Swedish has a social media policy

See who is blogging at Swedish

   Keep up with Swedish:

    Check out the Swedish blog

Find a Physician

              Subscribe to
             HealthWatch