Swedish News Blog

Support social work services and Swedish Cancer Institute in Issaquah

Kylie Davidson, MPH CHES

Kylie Davidson, MPH CHES
Supervisor, Health Education, Swedish Cancer Institute

Come and join us for a handbag auction that supports social work services at Swedish Issaquah and bid on new or gently used designer handbags, sunglasses, and jewelry. The auction will take place on Saturday, October 11, 2014 from 11:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m., at the Newcastle Country Club in Bellevue.
 
Every dollar raised will go towards funding the Cancer Social Work Services program at Swedish Issaquah. Social workers play a critical role in supporting cancer patients by providing a safe place for patients to talk about their emotions. In addition to ...

Bilateral Mastectomies: a patient’s personal decision

Claire L. Buchanan, MD, FACS

Claire L. Buchanan, MD, FACS
Breast Cancer Surgeon

Last week the Seattle Times reported that women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer in one breast are choosing to have bilateral mastectomies to reduce their chances of getting cancer again, but recent research shows that that there is no survival benefit, even in younger women. Researchers at Stanford and the Cancer Prevention Institute of California evaluated the outcomes of over 190,000 women from the California Cancer registry who were diagnosed with breast cancer in one breast between 1998 and 2011. The rate of bilateral mastectomies rose from 2% to 12.3% over the study period, yet there was no survival benefit to bilateral mastectomies versus lumpectomy and radiation.

To those of us who work in the field, this data comes as no surprise; the trend of bilateral mastectomies is a known phenomenon. More than 10 years ago, I remember the chatter among surgeons at national meetings asking if others noticed that more and more, younger women were coming in asking for bilateral mastectomies. Back in 2007, Dr. Todd Tuttle authored a study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology that found that the rate of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy was on the rise, from just under 2% in 1998 to 5% in 2003. This week’s study only validates that this upward trend shows no sign of leveling off.

Why do patients choose bilateral mastectomies?

Many women ....

Swedish Cancer Institute Launches New Hematologic Malignancies Program

Swedish News

International hematology expert Dr. John Pagel recruited to expand Swedish’s treatment for, and research on, blood cancers

 

SEATTLE — September 8, 2014 — The Swedish Cancer Institute is launching a Hematologic Malignancies program for the expanded treatment and research of blood-based cancers such as leukemia, multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Newly recruited international hematology expert John Pagel, M.D., Ph.D., will serve as chief of the new program, which launches this month.
 
“Dr. Pagel brings with him a world-class reputation for research and excellence in patient care,” said Swedish Cancer Institute Executive Director Thomas Brown, M.D. “This new program will add to our existing strengths in caring for patients with hematologic malignancies and further develop our autologous hematopoietic stem cell program. These efforts allow the Swedish Cancer Institute to continue providing the most versatile and comprehensive cancer care in the Pacific Northwest.”
 
Dr. Pagel’s practice will include caring for patients with acute and chronic leukemias, multiple myeloma, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, and myelodysplastic syndromes, as well as other myeloproliferative disorders. In addition to providing established treatments such as autologous stem cell transplants, the program will develop novel therapies for the treatment of blood-based diseases through research collaborations and studies initiated by Swedish Cancer Institute physicians.

Red Doors at Swedish Cancer Institute

Kylie Davidson, MPH CHES

Kylie Davidson, MPH CHES
Supervisor, Health Education, Swedish Cancer Institute

During the next couple of weeks, you will find various doors and walls at the Swedish Cancer Institute decorated in a beautiful red wrapping paper. This is a symbol of Swedish’ support for Gilda’s Club and their Red Door campaign.
 

The Red Door campaign was established to ...

Cancer Awareness and Community Events

Brian Aylward, BS, CHES

Brian Aylward, BS, CHES
Health Navigator

Nearly every month of the year has been recognized as a cancer-related awareness month. Cancer awareness months provide the perfect opportunity to share information about specific types of cancer in order to increase knowledge about symptoms, screenings and treatment options, to reduce the stigma of cancer, and to help raise funds for cancer research.

Whether you show your support by wearing a cancer awareness color or ribbon, discuss cancer-related information with family members and friends, or attend a community event or fundraiser, your voice counts. We encourage you to help spread the word and express the importance of education, prevention, early detection and treatment:

Oncology social workers help patients with cancer

Tricia Matteson, MSW, LSWAIC

Tricia Matteson, MSW, LSWAIC
Oncology Social Worker

“What happens if my insurance won’t pay for all of this treatment?”
“How do I tell my young daughter about my cancer?”
“My spouse is really struggling, but I don’t know how to help him.” 
“How will I get to radiation every day if I can’t drive?”
“My friends and family call a lot, but I don’t feel like talking to them”
“I’m scared.”   “I’m angry”   “I’m sad”    “I’m confused”
“What’s a power of attorney…and do I need one?”
“Where can I find out about a support group? ”
“I wish I knew where to turn.”

If you are faced with a diagnosis of cancer, you may be asking similar questions and wondering where to turn for answers.  A good place to start is with an oncology social worker.  Oncology social workers assist with the non-medical issues that often arise when someone is diagnosed with cancer.  We have master’s degrees in social work, and are specially trained to provide counseling and assistance with services that can reduce stress for you and your family through all phases of your cancer diagnosis and treatment.  Social work services are available at the Swedish Cancer Institute at our First Hill, Edmonds, and Issaquah campuses, and are provided at no cost to our patients. 

We can help you:

Active Women, Healthy Women - A Partnership Between Swedish Cancer Institute and Team Survivor Northwest

Brian Aylward, BS, CHES

Brian Aylward, BS, CHES
Health Navigator

We are happy to announce that Swedish Cancer Institute and Team Survivor Northwest have recently partnered to offer an ongoing fitness program for women cancer survivors at the Swedish Cancer Institute. Certified fitness instructors will assist you in assessing your health and fitness levels to help you reap the benefits of exercise. The focus of Active Women, Healthy Women is on stretching, strength training and cardio workouts. Come enjoy the camaraderie of other women in this safe and supportive environment.

Active Women, Healthy Women is available at the Swedish/First Hill and Swedish/Issaquah campuses and is open to patients, family members and caregivers, free of charge.

Fall 2013 Dates:

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