Swedish News Blog

Swedish-Affiliated Neurologist Interviewed about Results of New Study on 'Mini' Strokes and Clot-Busting Drugs

Swedish News

SEATTLE, Oct. 8, 2012 - A short video news story on new research around the use of clot-busting dugs to treat 'mini' strokes was recently posted on the national news sites EverydayHealth.com and AOL.com. The two-minute long piece features an interview with William Likosky, M.D., medical director of Swedish Neuroscience Institute's Stroke Program, as well as a local stroke patient.

Swedish to Host World’s First Live-Instagrammed, Live-Tweeted Hearing Restoration Surgery as Part of Month-Long Educational Web Series on Hearing Loss

Swedish News

SEATTLE, Sept. 26, 2012 - Swedish Medical Center and Douglas Backous, M.D., medical director of the Center for Hearing and Skull Base Surgery at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute, will host the world’s first live-instagrammed and live-tweeted cochlear implant (hearing restoration) surgery on Tuesday, Oct. 2 at 7 a.m. Pacific Time (PT).

Issaquah Press Publishes Article, 'Issaquah Brothers Become Brain Surgeons for a Day'

Swedish News

SEATTLE, Aug. 29, 2012 - The Issaquah Press posted an article on their web site today headlined 'Issaquah brothers become brain surgeons for a day' about two Issaquah brothers who were among those invited by the Swedish Neuroscience Institute to become brain surgeons for a day on Aug. 24.

Brain Cancer Research in Seattle Leads to New Treatment Options for Patients

Swedish News

SEATTLE, Aug. 27, 2012 – Since its opening in 2008, the Ben & Catherine Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment (the Ivy Center) at Swedish Medical Center's Neuroscience Institute has led the expansion drive of major research projects and expanded treatment options for patients living with brain cancer in the Pacific Northwest and throughout the world. The Ivy Center was founded in 2008 to create a world-class treatment and research facility focused on delivering excellent patient care and advancing progress toward more effective treatments for brain cancer.

KING 5 TV Interviews Multiple Sclerosis Specialist from Swedish about Study that Looked at Marijuana Use for Spacicity in People with MS

Swedish News

SEATTLE, May 15, 2012 - KING 5 Television (NBC) aired a story last night about a study published yesterday in the Canadian Medical Association Journal that looked at smoking marijuana as a treatment for spacicity in people with multiple sclerosis (MS).

Swedish Neuroscience Institute-affiliated neurologist James Bowen, M.D., who is medical director of the new MS Center at Swedish - along with one of his patients who has experienced spacicity relief from this treatment - were interviewed for the two-minute piece.

Swedish Set to Open State-of-the-Art Multiple Sclerosis Center; New Facility Has Been Under Development for Several Years and Largely Funded Through Philanthropy

Swedish News

SEATTLE – April 6, 2012 – Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) is set to open its new MS Center to patients. Carefully designed for easy accessibility and to promote the well-being of people with MS, the new 11,700-square-foot center gives SNI the ability to consolidate all of its MS services into one facility. An additional 1,500-square-feet of outside therapy terrace will provide a safe environment for patients to work with a therapist on improving their gait over different terrain.

The new center also enables scientists, researchers, physicians and patients to work collaboratively toward new treatment options for those diagnosed with MS. In a move that further establishes Swedish’s neuroscience program as a leader in the region, the MS Center at Swedish is the largest, most comprehensive facility of its kind on the West Coast and one of only a handful in the country.

KING 5 TV Airs Story about Procedure to Restore Hearing that Features Medical Director of Center for Hearing and Skull Base Surgery at Swedish

Swedish News

SEATTLE, Feb. 21, 2012 - KING 5 Television (NBC) aired a story on Feb. 20 about a surgical procedure to restore hearing that involved implating a tiny, artificial bone in the inner ear after a woman accidentally punctured her eardrum with a Q-Tip.

Douglas Backous, M.D., medical director of the Swedish Neuroscience Institute's Center for Hearing and Skull Base Surgery, was interviewed for the piece.

To watch the story on KING 5 TV's Web site, click here.

###

Results 8-14 of 94

More information about the Swedish newsroom

Explore the rest of the Swedish blog

Swedish has a social media policy

See who is blogging at Swedish

   Keep up with Swedish:

    Check out the Swedish blog

Find a Physician

              Subscribe to
             HealthWatch