Swedish News Blog

KING 5 TV Interviews Multiple Sclerosis Specialist from Swedish about Study that Looked at Marijuana Use for Spacicity in People with MS

Swedish News

SEATTLE, May 15, 2012 - KING 5 Television (NBC) aired a story last night about a study published yesterday in the Canadian Medical Association Journal that looked at smoking marijuana as a treatment for spacicity in people with multiple sclerosis (MS).

Swedish Neuroscience Institute-affiliated neurologist James Bowen, M.D., who is medical director of the new MS Center at Swedish - along with one of his patients who has experienced spacicity relief from this treatment - were interviewed for the two-minute piece.

Swedish Set to Open State-of-the-Art Multiple Sclerosis Center; New Facility Has Been Under Development for Several Years and Largely Funded Through Philanthropy

Swedish News

SEATTLE – April 6, 2012 – Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) is set to open its new MS Center to patients. Carefully designed for easy accessibility and to promote the well-being of people with MS, the new 11,700-square-foot center gives SNI the ability to consolidate all of its MS services into one facility. An additional 1,500-square-feet of outside therapy terrace will provide a safe environment for patients to work with a therapist on improving their gait over different terrain.

The new center also enables scientists, researchers, physicians and patients to work collaboratively toward new treatment options for those diagnosed with MS. In a move that further establishes Swedish’s neuroscience program as a leader in the region, the MS Center at Swedish is the largest, most comprehensive facility of its kind on the West Coast and one of only a handful in the country.

What you should know about Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Bobbie (Barbara) J. Severson, ARNP

Bobbie (Barbara) J. Severson, ARNP
ARNP, Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center

You hear the diagnosis multiple sclerosis (MS) and your world stops. You don’t know what to think, who to tell, or what to do about your future.

In this video, four people living with MS tell their stories:

But even if you aren’t diagnosed with MS, here are some things you should know:

KING 5 TV Airs Story about Procedure to Restore Hearing that Features Medical Director of Center for Hearing and Skull Base Surgery at Swedish

Swedish News

SEATTLE, Feb. 21, 2012 - KING 5 Television (NBC) aired a story on Feb. 20 about a surgical procedure to restore hearing that involved implating a tiny, artificial bone in the inner ear after a woman accidentally punctured her eardrum with a Q-Tip.

Douglas Backous, M.D., medical director of the Swedish Neuroscience Institute's Center for Hearing and Skull Base Surgery, was interviewed for the piece.

To watch the story on KING 5 TV's Web site, click here.

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Swedish Opens Cerebrovascular Center on Cherry Hill Campus

Swedish News

SEATTLE, Feb. 7, 2012 – Since diagnosing and managing cerebrovascular disorders can require a complex assortment of specialty evaluations and testing, Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) recently opened a new Cerebrovascular Center on the first floor of James Tower at the Cherry Hill campus (550 17th Ave., Suite 110, Seattle).

SNI used patient-focused convenience as the foundation for designing the new facility, which opened Dec. 19, 2011.

“In this one location, SNI has consolidated its existing advanced diagnostics and interventional therapeutics, as well as the newest generation of technology,” said David Newell, M.D., cerebrovascular neurosurgeon and chief of Neuroscience. “The center also features the expertise of a care team that includes cerebrovascular neurosurgeons, vascular neurologists, neuroendovascular and radiosurgical specialists, neuroradiologists, neurohospitalists, and advanced practitioners who are trained to evaluate and treat cerebrovascular disorders.”

The facility also includes a Stroke Clinic.

A comprehensive menu of procedures

In addition to advanced diagnostics, the center offers ...

Newly Formed Partnership with Swedish Neuroscience Institute will Bolster Stroke-Care Services for Walla Walla Community

Swedish News

WALLA WALLA, WA, Feb. 7, 2012 – Walla Walla area residents facing a potential or actual acute stroke will benefit from a recently formed partnership between the Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) Acute TeleStroke Program and Walla Walla General Hospital (WWGH) that will bolster WWGH’s stroke support services through 24/7, around-the-clock access to SNI’s nationally recognized stroke team experts via real-time, telemedicine-based technology.

This TeleStroke partnership provides an as-needed link between the Emergency Center team at WWGH and the comprehensive team of stroke specialists based at the Swedish/Cherry Hill campus campus in Seattle. With the help of a secure, video-conferencing network, members of SNI’s Stroke Program are able to quickly perform ‘virtual’ bedside neurological evaluations that allow them to examine patients, review brain images and quickly select the best acute stroke treatments in collaboration with WWGH Emergency Center physicians.

WWGH sees more than 125 patients a year who are experiencing signs and symptoms of TIA or Stroke. Many of those patients may qualify for the TeleStroke program. “We have the equipment and team, now we have the expertise of the physicians and staff at Swedish to help better serve our patients,” said Jackie Fullerton, vice president for patient- care services at WWGH. “The difference this can make for our patients and their families is huge.”

In fact, the first week that the program went live ...

Swedish to Host Online Live Stream Dec. 16 about Essential Tremor and Its Treatment Options, Including Deep Brain Stimulation

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