Swedish News Blog

Be a Brain Surgeon for a Day!

Dana Lewis

Dana Lewis
Digital Media & Internal Communications | Swedish Blog Administrator

Dr. Greg Foltz, a brain surgeon from the Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute in Seattle is inviting 25 people (including students) to join him on Friday, Aug. 24 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. to become a “Brain Surgeon for a Day.” (Enter by 11:59 p.m. on Thursday, August 9, 2012.)

Randomly selected individuals will spend time learning about the brain and its key parts. These individuals will see how Swedish surgeons are using the latest research to find new treatments for brain cancer. As part of the event, these individuals will:

  • Walk away with their own pair of Swedish medical “scrubs”, just like a doctor
  • Participate in a behind the scenes tour and gain special access to places within the hospital most visitors do not get to see
  • Rub elbows in the confides of the “green room” and meet some of the smartest physicians of the Pacific Northwest region
  • Learn about brain tumors and why some are so deadly

At the conclusion of the tour, Dr. Foltz and other neuroscientists will host a lunch session with participants about his every day battle against brain cancer, a disease he hopes will be cured one day soon.

“Brain Surgeon for a Day” Schedule of Events:

  • 11:00 AM: Scrub Up with your new pair of medical scrubs
  • 11:05 AM: Meet and Greet with Dr. Greg Foltz of the Ivy Brain Tumor Center at Swedish
  • 11:15 AM: Take part in an interactive session with brain tissue samples at the Seattle Science Foundation
  • 11:50 AM: Guided behind-the-scenes tour of the Ivy Brain Tumor Center research lab, clinic and research partners
  • 12:05 PM: Visit a behind-the-scenes location
  • 12:20 PM: Lunch and Q&A session with Dr. Foltz and other special guests
  • 1:00 PM Conclusion

Other possible events during the two-hour event:

  • See the first commercial Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Core Facility in the U.S. and how it is being used for brain cancer.
  • Explore the genome sequencing machines that help decode DNA in tumors.
  • Meet ....

What is the difference between a Cochlear Implant and a Bone Anchored Implant?

Stacey D. Watson, MS, CCC-A

When someone with a hearing loss comes into our Center, we talk with them about many different technology options to help them reconnect to their world. Most people are familiar with hearing aids. However, many have questions about a Cochlear Implant or a Bone Anchored Implant, often called a Baha, and wonder if these implants would be an option for them.

A Bone Anchored Implant is appropriate for someone where traditional hearing aids are not efficient because of draining ears or chronic infections, blockage or damage in the outer or middle ear or loss of all hearing in one ear such as following an acoustic tumor removal. Candidates have either a conductive hearing loss or a single sided deafness. The bone anchored implant uses ....

Finding Art in the Multiple Sclerosis Experience Third-Annual MS Art Show Set for June 16

Swedish News

SEATTLE, June 11, 2012 – Multiple Sclerosis (MS) sucks, as the painting says, but it also inspires art. The MS Center at Swedish is set to unveil its third-annual Art Show. Those touched by MS and living in the Pacific Northwest have been invited to submit their work. No visual media is off limits; all people living with and affected by MS from the Northwest region are accepted. The show's goal is to enhance wellness and quality of life for individuals affected by the disease.

KING 5 TV Interviews Multiple Sclerosis Specialist from Swedish about Study that Looked at Marijuana Use for Spacicity in People with MS

Swedish News

SEATTLE, May 15, 2012 - KING 5 Television (NBC) aired a story last night about a study published yesterday in the Canadian Medical Association Journal that looked at smoking marijuana as a treatment for spacicity in people with multiple sclerosis (MS).

Swedish Neuroscience Institute-affiliated neurologist James Bowen, M.D., who is medical director of the new MS Center at Swedish - along with one of his patients who has experienced spacicity relief from this treatment - were interviewed for the two-minute piece.

Swedish Set to Open State-of-the-Art Multiple Sclerosis Center; New Facility Has Been Under Development for Several Years and Largely Funded Through Philanthropy

Swedish News

SEATTLE – April 6, 2012 – Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) is set to open its new MS Center to patients. Carefully designed for easy accessibility and to promote the well-being of people with MS, the new 11,700-square-foot center gives SNI the ability to consolidate all of its MS services into one facility. An additional 1,500-square-feet of outside therapy terrace will provide a safe environment for patients to work with a therapist on improving their gait over different terrain.

The new center also enables scientists, researchers, physicians and patients to work collaboratively toward new treatment options for those diagnosed with MS. In a move that further establishes Swedish’s neuroscience program as a leader in the region, the MS Center at Swedish is the largest, most comprehensive facility of its kind on the West Coast and one of only a handful in the country.

What you should know about Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Bobbie (Barbara) J. Severson, ARNP

Bobbie (Barbara) J. Severson, ARNP
ARNP, Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center

You hear the diagnosis multiple sclerosis (MS) and your world stops. You don’t know what to think, who to tell, or what to do about your future.

In this video, four people living with MS tell their stories:

But even if you aren’t diagnosed with MS, here are some things you should know:

KING 5 TV Airs Story about Procedure to Restore Hearing that Features Medical Director of Center for Hearing and Skull Base Surgery at Swedish

Swedish News

SEATTLE, Feb. 21, 2012 - KING 5 Television (NBC) aired a story on Feb. 20 about a surgical procedure to restore hearing that involved implating a tiny, artificial bone in the inner ear after a woman accidentally punctured her eardrum with a Q-Tip.

Douglas Backous, M.D., medical director of the Swedish Neuroscience Institute's Center for Hearing and Skull Base Surgery, was interviewed for the piece.

To watch the story on KING 5 TV's Web site, click here.

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