Swedish News Blog

Exercising in the heat

Paul Huang, MD

Paul Huang, MD
Interventional Cardiologist & Medical Director, Swedish Heart & Vascular

Even though regular exercise is important for cardiovascular health, exercising in hot weather can lead to heat exhaustion or even heat stroke. These conditions result from the production of excess body heat, overwhelming the body’s capacity for heat release and raising the core body temperature.

What you should know:

The signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion include:

  • heavy sweating
  • fatigue
  • headache
  • pale and clammy skin
  • thirst
  • increased heart rate
  • dizziness or fainting
  • nausea and vomiting
  • muscle and abdominal cramps
  • elevated temperature.

What is heat stroke?

Heat stroke occurs when the core body temperature exceeds 104 degrees F, accompanied by seizure or coma. The primary cause of heat exhaustion and stroke is dehydration with inadequate fluid and electrolyte repletion. Those with the following risk factors are particularly prone to heat exhaustion and stroke: extreme young or old, pregnancy, chronic illness (in particular cardiac or respiratory diseases), alcohol consumption, extreme physical exertion, and certain medications.

So how do I exercise in the heat?

Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute Electrophysiologist Interviewed for KING 5 TV Story on LifeVest

Swedish News

SEATTLE, March 30, 2012 - Seattle NBC affiliate KING Television (Channel 5) aired a story during their 5 p.m. PT newscast tonight about a relatively new, FDA-approved medical device called LifeVest ®. The wearable defibrillator is a treatment option for sudden cardiac arrest that offers patients advanced protection and monitoring as well as improved quality of life.

LifeVest is the first wearable defibrillator. Unlike an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), the LifeVest is worn outside the body rather than implanted in the chest. This device continuously monitors the patient's heart with dry, non-adhesive sensing electrodes to detect life-threatening abnormal heart rhythms. If a life-threatening rhythm is detected, the device alerts the patient prior to delivering a treatment shock, and thus allows a conscious patient to delay the treatment shock. If the patient becomes unconscious, the device releases a Blue™ gel over the therapy electrodes and delivers an electrical shock to restore normal rhythm.

Emergency Cardiac Care at Four Swedish Campuses Recognized by the Washington State Department of Health

Swedish News

SEATTLE, Dec. 20, 2011 – Swedish recently learned that the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) certified four of its campuses to provide emergency cardiac care services to patients throughout the Puget Sound region. Swedish Cherry Hill and Swedish Edmonds received Level 1 designations, and Swedish First Hill and Swedish Ballard received Level 2 designations.

The DOH recently developed the emergency cardiac system to provide a consistent, statewide certification program that recognizes the level of emergency care available to cardiac patients in medical facilities across Washington state.

This new designation confirms Swedish’s long standing role as a leader in providing critical cardiac care in emergency settings. The Level 1 designation for Swedish Cherry Hill and Swedish Edmonds signifies that both campuses have the full range of equipment and staffing to provide 24/7 percutaneous (catheter-based) cardiac interventions as a provision of the Level 1 emergency cardiac care designation.

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