Swedish News Blog

Swedish Community Specialty Clinic’s impact profiled

Swedish News

The Swedish Community Specialty Clinic, which provides free specialized care for low-income patients, was recently profiled by the Catholic Health Association of the United States. The piece looks at the clinic’s impact on patient care and the savings it has generated by reducing unnecessary Emergency Department visits. Clinic Manager Tom Gibbons is quoted in the piece.

In February, Swedish was recognized for Outstanding Community Outreach by Seattle Business magazine, an award that cited the work of the Community Specialty Clinic, among other efforts.

In 2013, the Swedish Community Specialty Clinic received the Mission Leadership Award from Providence Health & Services. Swedish, a secular hospital system, is affiliated with Providence, a catholic health care ministry.

An innovative solution for the un (and under) insured

Colleen Bromen

Colleen Bromen
Assistant Director of Major Gifts, Swedish Foundation

Health-care reform is a big, confusing, emotionally-charged topic. Now that 2014 is underway and the Affordable Care Act is beginning to take effect, many more Americans will have greater access to health insurance than they had before. It is estimated that 180,000 people in King County alone will become newly insured this year.

Still, there will be many people in our community – and throughout the country – who will continue to face barriers to accessing care. Some of them will be considered underinsured because they can’t afford to fill the gap in medical expenses not covered by their insurance. Others receiving Medicaid may find it difficult to locate a physician who is willing to take them on as a patient, as doctors are not required to see Medicaid patients, and many don’t. And then, there will probably always be those people who don’t have any insurance at all because, for one reason or another, they can’t sign up: the homeless, the chronically mentally ill, those who can’t read or write English, to name just a few.

Community clinics scattered throughout the nation, including several in our community, help address this problem on the primary care end. But access to specialty medical care for low-income patients facing barriers to care like the ones described above is likely to remain extremely difficult.

Fortunately, an innovative program pioneered at Swedish is addressing this effectively, and is likely to become a national model.

The Swedish Community Specialty Clinic (SCSC) was expanded and moved to the Swedish/First Hill campus in  ..

Swedish Honored at Leaders in Health Care 2014 Event

Swedish News

Seattle Business magazine recognizes Swedish for Outstanding Community Outreach

News Release
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                        
 
Contacts: Clay Holtzman, Swedish, 206-386-2748, clay.holtzman@swedish.org
 
Swedish Honored at Leaders in Health Care 2014 Event
Seattle Business magazine recognizes Swedish for Outstanding Community Outreach
 
SEATTLE — Feb. 25, 2014 — Swedish Health Services’ Community Benefits Program received the Outstanding Community Outreach award at Seattle Business magazine’s fifth annual Leaders in Health Care awards celebration. The largest and most comprehensive non-profit health provider in the Pacific Northwest, Swedish is known for creating high-impact community outreach programs such as the Swedish Community Specialty Clinic and Global to Local (G2L).
 
The Leaders in Health Care awards honor 25 outstanding organizations in eight categories, ranging from medical research to lifetime achievement. The Outstanding Community Outreach award recognizes organizations that are committed to developing and implementing original programs that improve the health of local communities.  
 
“It is an honor to be recognized with such a prestigious award,” said Tom Gibbon, manager of the Swedish Community Specialty Clinic and Ballard High School Teen Clinic. “It showcases years of work that not only benefits the most vulnerable populations in our community, but also offers sustainable and replicable solutions that will change how care is delivered.”
 
The Swedish Community Benefits Program evaluates public health data and collaborates with local organizations to produce initiatives that address a wide range of community health needs in the Pacific Northwest. Since 2006, Swedish has launched more than 15 initiatives. Programs such as the Swedish Community Specialty Clinic and Global to Local exist to combat long-term challenges while addressing immediate health care needs.  
 

Swedish Foundation Raises $100 Million to Help Meet Increasing Demand for Regional Health-Care Services

Swedish News

SEATTLE, Oct. 26, 2012 – Swedish Medical Center's seven-year fund-raising initiative, called The Campaign for Swedish, has raised $103 million, exceeding its initial $100 million fund-raising goal in approximately five-and-a-half years. The Campaign, launched to help improve patient care and treatment options throughout the Swedish system, is the largest fund-raising effort undertaken by the private, non-profit health system to date.

Swedish Provides $112 Million in Community Benefit Programs and Services in 2010

Swedish News

SEATTLE, April 27, 2011 – In the 2010 fiscal year, Swedish increased its total community benefit giving by more than 40 percent, providing $112 million to charity and uncompensated care, health research programs and community health education services. Swedish provided $66.5 million in subsidized health-care services, $25.4 million in free or subsidized charity care assistance, $8 million in medical and health-care education, $7.9 million in research benefits and $4.3 million in community health services. This dramatic uptick in community benefits is closely tied to the economy, which has exacerbated the need for these services. In total, 14,639 patient visits were covered by charity care or were provided with financial assistance and 12,668 patients paid nothing for their care.

“We are a not-for-profit organization with a 100-year charitable history and a mission to be the best community partner possible,” said Dan Dixon, vice president of external affairs at Swedish. “It is our fiduciary responsibility to ensure that everyone in our community has access to the best available, quality care, including screenings and health education programs. Everyone in our health-care system is committed to the important responsibility we have to the health and well being of the communities we serve.”

Swedish, Project Access Northwest Open Free Specialty Clinic for Low-Income Uninsured and Underinsured Patients

Swedish News

SEATTLE, Oct. 21, 2010 – To meet a pressing community need, Swedish recently opened the Swedish Community Specialty Clinic, which is a new facility designed exclusively to treat low-income uninsured and underinsured patients. Glaser Surgical Clinic on Swedish's First Hill campus and the Mother Joseph Clinic on the medical center’s Cherry Hill campus consolidated and are now operating as one integrated, expanded service.

Swedish Announces Official Launch of $100 Million Capital Campaign

Swedish News
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