Swedish News Blog

Detecting thyroid cancer using ultrasound

Joseph C. Sniezek
The incidence of thyroid cancer is steadily increasing in the U.S. while the reasons for this increase are still unclear.  No environmental exposure or lifestyle trend has been linked to this recent rise but interestingly, some researchers believe that the increasing use of ultrasound in evaluating the neck and thyroid has raised the number of cancers being detected at earlier stages. Regardless of the cause of this recent uptick in thyroid cancer, there is no doubt that ultrasound has fundamentally changed the way in which thyroid lesions and cancers are evaluated and followed.
 
Ultrasound technology has undergone a dramatic improvement in recent years providing clear and precise images without exposing the patient to any radiation.  Thyroid nodules that are suspicious for malignancy can now be identified before they are large enough to be felt in the neck by the patient or health care provider.

 
When a  ...

PALB2 Gene Mutation & Breast Cancer: What it Means For You

Robert Resta

Robert Resta
Genetic Counselor

PALB2 is a gene that was first linked to hereditary breast cancer risk back in 2007. Today’s Seattle Times reports on a recent study about PALB2 that was just published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study, the largest to date, detailed the breast cancer risks faced by  women – and to a lesser extent, men – who carry a mutation in their PALB2 gene. The breast cancer risks were several times greater than the ~12% risk faced by all women, and varied with the woman’s age and family history. Currently, there is no consistent evidence to suggest  that men or women who carry a single PALB2 gene mutation are at greater risks of developing ovarian or other cancers.
 
PALB2 genetic testing can provide very important information that can help women and their families better understand and reduce their risks of developing breast cancer. However, even among women with a very strong personal or family history of breast cancer, very few will test positive. Studies suggest that only about 1-3% of high risk women  will carry a PALB2 mutation. In my personal experience, I have tested about 300 high risk women for PALB2 mutations, and ...

Summer, sun, and skin cancer - what you should know

Andrew R. Ting, MD, FACS

Andrew R. Ting, MD, FACS
General Surgeon

It is easy to get carried away enjoying the string of lovely sunny summer days we have had in Seattle. Our sun is strong, and our unprotected skin vulnerable to UV damage that can lead to sun damage and perhaps skin cancers. Skin cancers fall into the broad categories of squamous cell cancer, basal cell cancer and melanoma. Each of these cancers are usually surgically excised or destroyed by either a dermatologist or general surgeon.

How to tell if a skin lesion is concerning

Warning signs include moles larger than a pencil eraser head, change in size, change in color, itching, bleeding or scab forming over the mole. Areas of particular concern include face, neck, back and extremities. However, skin cancers can also develop in areas where the sun does not shine.

What to do if I have a skin cancer?

If you have a mole or skin lesion that is concerning, bring it up with your family physician who may biopsy it or refer you ..

Pacific Cancer Research Consortium Receives $6.6 Million Grant to Expand Access to Oncology Care, Trials

Swedish News

Consortium includes Swedish Cancer Institute, Providence Portland Medical Center and St. Luke’s Mountain States Tumor Institute

News Release
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                           
 
Contacts: Clay Holtzman, Swedish Cancer Institute, 206-386-2748, clay.holtzman@swedish.org
                  Jean Marks, Providence Portland Medical Center, 503-215-6433, jean.marks@providence.org
                  Ken Dey, St. Luke’s Mountain State Tumor Institute, 208-381-2894, deyke@slhs.org

SEATTLE — August 5, 2014 — The National Cancer Institute’s Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) has awarded a consortium of  community cancer centers from the Western United States a five-year grant worth $6.6 million to improve access to lifesaving cancer care and clinical trials across a five-state region.
 
The Pacific Cancer Research Consortium is led by three primary sites: the Swedish Cancer Institute (SCI) in Seattle, which will serve as the grant’s fiduciary, Providence Portland Medical Center (PPMC) in Oregon and St. Luke’s Mountain States Tumor Institute (MSTI) in Boise, Idaho. The consortium also includes 37 other clinical care sites in Alaska, California, Idaho, Oregon and Washington. The program opened on Aug. 4.
 
The Consortium’s grant is part of a $93 million funding cycle announced today by NCORP and awarded to 53 researchers across the country.
 
“We are extremely honored that the National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program has selected our consortium to lead the expansion of cancer clinical trials throughout the Western region,” said Thomas Brown, M.D., executive director of the Swedish Cancer Institute. “Together Swedish Cancer Institute, Providence Cancer Center at Providence Portland Medical Center, St. Luke’s Mountain States Tumor Institute, and a network of clinical care sites are giving patients and their families access to the most current investigational therapies that give hope to advancing the care of cancer patients throughout our region and beyond. Access to clinical trials is the key to providing high quality cancer care in the 21st century.”

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in Head and Neck Cancer

Joseph C. Sniezek
Cancer of the oropharynx (throat) has undergone a drastic and dramatic change over the last decade.  In the past, most throat cancers were linked with prolonged cigarette smoking and alcohol use.  Now, the occurrence of throat cancer is rising and 80-90% is likely caused by an infection with Human Papillomavirus (HPV).  Many high-profile personalities, including actor Michael Douglas, have recently revealed that they have experienced HPV-related throat cancer.

What causes HPV-related Oropharynx cancer?

Infection with the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is known to cause genital warts and lead to various genital cancers, but now it appears to also cause the majority of throat cancers.  The types of HPV that lead to throat cancer are generally sexually transmitted, though some researchers believe that even kissing may result in HPV transmission.   The time period from HPV exposure to the development of a throat cancer is often decades. Although the cancer may be slow-growing, it is important to have annual check-ups with your physician and dentist who can assess your oral health appropriately. 
 
How is HPV-related Oropharynx cancer treated?


HPV-related throat cancer can ...

Mesothelioma update: shorter course of treatment and improved survival rates?

Alexander Farivar, MD

Alexander Farivar, MD
Thoracic Surgeon

There have been some very exciting recent developments we (the Thoracic Surgery team at Swedish Cancer Institute) are utilizing in the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM).

Over the past year we have offered some of our patients deemed appropriate for surgery a more streamlined approach to their overall care. Previously we have tried to offer chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation to all patients who were healthy and strong enough to undergo the three treatments, as mesothelioma is an aggressive cancer requiring aggressive treatment to optimize survival. This new approach still offers both surgery and radiation, but chemotherapy is given only to those found to have cancer in lymph nodes in the center of chest during surgery.

The advantages of this new treatment paradigm are ...

Join Swedish Cancer Institute at Seattle's Lung Force Walk on June 7

Joelle Thirsk Fathi, DNP

The American Lung Association (ALA) has dedicated 100+ years to promoting lung health through prevention of tuberculosis, cleaner air, smoking prevention, and providing resources to those who wish to quit smoking.

In their fight for healthy lungs, the ALA has taken on a fight with lung cancer.  Lung cancer is the #1 leading cause of cancer deaths in America for men and women.  This initiative against lung cancer is called Lung Force.

Swedish Cancer Institute has a long history of fighting lung cancer through research, early detection via low dose CT screening, staging of lung cancer, surgical and medical therapies, and palliation of lung cancer.

In support of the ALA and their efforts to spread awareness of the risks of lung cancer, raising funds for lung cancer research and providing advocacy for those affected by lung cancer, Swedish will participate in the Lung Force Walk on June 7th, in Seattle.

We welcome you to join Team Swedish for a fun filled morning of music, the 5K walk, and festivities at the finish line.  You can register for the walk for free and/or make a donation in any amount that you wish.  Dogs are invited to walk too!

To join and learn more, click here and  ....

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