Swedish News Blog

Help! My lung cancer is progressing after a great response on targeted therapy. Now what?

Howard L. (Jack) West, MD

Howard L. (Jack) West, MD
Medical Oncologist, Swedish Cancer Institute

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Is there a role for post-operative chemotherapy in early stage lung cancer?

Howard L. (Jack) West, MD

Howard L. (Jack) West, MD
Medical Oncologist, Swedish Cancer Institute

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Is there an age cap for chemotherapy?

Howard L. (Jack) West, MD

Howard L. (Jack) West, MD
Medical Oncologist, Swedish Cancer Institute

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Redefining Cancer: New Targets and New Treatments

Howard L. (Jack) West, MD

Howard L. (Jack) West, MD
Medical Oncologist, Swedish Cancer Institute

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Woman Donates Bells to Swedish Cancer Institute on the Issaquah Campus for Patients to Ring in Celebration of Treatment Milestones

Swedish News

ISSAQUAH, Nov. 1, 2012 - A Snoqualmie-area resident treated for her cancer at Swedish/ssaquah recently donated two large, wall-mounted bells to the Cancer Institute at that campus. Cancer patients who reach treatment milestones and/or finish their treatment can ring them as a way to signal and celebrate the momentous occassions. 

Swedish Foundation Raises $100 Million to Help Meet Increasing Demand for Regional Health-Care Services

Swedish News

SEATTLE, Oct. 26, 2012 – Swedish Medical Center's seven-year fund-raising initiative, called The Campaign for Swedish, has raised $103 million, exceeding its initial $100 million fund-raising goal in approximately five-and-a-half years. The Campaign, launched to help improve patient care and treatment options throughout the Swedish system, is the largest fund-raising effort undertaken by the private, non-profit health system to date.

Are you or someone you know at risk for lung cancer and should you be screened?

Joelle Thirsk-Fathi, DNP

As lung cancer awareness month approaches us in November, we think about what lung cancer risk means to ourselves, friends, family members, and our patients. Many don’t know that lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S., far surpassing the rates of other cancers like breast, colon, and prostate.

What’s the risk of getting lung cancer?

The health risks from cigarette smoking are considerable and pose the largest risk for lung cancer; more than any other risk factors combined. Men who smoke are at 23 x the increased risk and women at 16 x the risk for lung cancer. This lung cancer risk is directly correlated with the concentration of (numbers of cigarettes smoked each day) X (number of years smoked).

Fortunately, the number of those who have quit smoking is growing, but sadly, more than half of all newly diagnosed lung cancers today are occurring in former smokers or non-smokers. People who have quit smoking remain at continued risk for lung cancer and there is also concern about lung cancer in second-hand smoke exposure.

The positive news on lung cancer is that two large multicenter research trials have been conducted in the past 12 years. The Swedish Cancer Institute was a major study site for one of these trials in association with Seattle Radiology. These trials have very clearly and consistently shown significant benefit in the early detection of lung cancer with low dose CT scan, reducing lung cancer mortality by 20%.

Who should be screened and how?

Understanding who is at risk for lung cancer is helpful but identifying...

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