Swedish News Blog

Swedish Cancer Institute Launches New Hematologic Malignancies Program

Swedish News

International hematology expert Dr. John Pagel recruited to expand Swedish’s treatment for, and research on, blood cancers

 

SEATTLE — September 8, 2014 — The Swedish Cancer Institute is launching a Hematologic Malignancies program for the expanded treatment and research of blood-based cancers such as leukemia, multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Newly recruited international hematology expert John Pagel, M.D., Ph.D., will serve as chief of the new program, which launches this month.
 
“Dr. Pagel brings with him a world-class reputation for research and excellence in patient care,” said Swedish Cancer Institute Executive Director Thomas Brown, M.D. “This new program will add to our existing strengths in caring for patients with hematologic malignancies and further develop our autologous hematopoietic stem cell program. These efforts allow the Swedish Cancer Institute to continue providing the most versatile and comprehensive cancer care in the Pacific Northwest.”
 
Dr. Pagel’s practice will include caring for patients with acute and chronic leukemias, multiple myeloma, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, and myelodysplastic syndromes, as well as other myeloproliferative disorders. In addition to providing established treatments such as autologous stem cell transplants, the program will develop novel therapies for the treatment of blood-based diseases through research collaborations and studies initiated by Swedish Cancer Institute physicians.

Swedish Provides Washington’s First ‘POEM’ Procedure

Swedish News

Per oral endoscopic myotomy could help a range of esophageal, stomach disorders


SEATTLE — September 05, 2014— Swedish surgeons became the first in Washington State to perform a Per Oral Endoscopic Myotomy (POEM) procedure when they successfully treated a 36-year-old patient diagnosed with a rare esophageal disorder known as achalasia.
 
POEM involves inserting an endoscope in the patient’s esophagus through the mouth. Once in place, surgeons use several instruments placed though a channel in the endoscope to treat the affected area. In the case of Washington’s first patient to undergo the procedure, a team of Swedish surgeons led by Ralph Aye, M.D., and Brian Louie, M.D., cut though the inner wall of the esophagus to place the endoscope between the inner esophageal layer and the outer muscular wall. By cutting the inner most muscle layer, pressure created by the valve between the esophagus and the stomach was relieved and the patient’s case was treated successfully.
 
Previously, patients with achalasia were treated using five minimally invasive incisions through the abdominal wall. But because POEM does not require any external incisions, patients can recover quicker with similarly successful outcomes.

Swedish First Hill NICU Earns Level IV Designation

Swedish News

Washington State Department of Health designates Swedish First Hill as a top care center for newborns


SEATTLE — September 4, 2014Swedish Medical Center announced today that the Washington State Department of Health has designated its First Hill neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as a Level IV regional NICU. This designation places Swedish First Hill among an elite group of care centers in Washington – and one of only two facilities in Seattle – with the capabilities to provide the highest level of treatment for critically ill and premature newborns.
 
“Infants born early or with life-threatening conditions need instant access to specialized care and a gifted team of caregivers,” said Melissa Cate, R.N., M.N., MBA, system administrative director for Women’s, Infants and Children’s Services at Swedish Medical Center. “Swedish First Hill is honored to provide the highest level of neonatal services to families in this region.”
 
Swedish First Hill is Washington’s largest NICU, with more than 75 NICU beds. The facility treats an average of 26 babies requiring Level IV treatment and 27 babies in need of Level III care each day. With its combined birth centers at Ballard, Edmonds, First Hill and Issaquah, Swedish provides care for more than 9,000 families each year.

KOMO 4 TV interviews Dr. Renee Low about concussions in soccer

Swedish News

Watch the KOMO 4 TV clip of Swedish neuropsychologist Renee Low, M.D., interviewing with anchor Eric Johnson about the dangers of concussions in soccer and the importance of baseline testing.

50th Anniversary, Hospital Expansion Celebration Sept. 10 at Swedish Edmonds

Swedish News

Community Invited to Celebrate Hospital’s Half-Century History and Building for the Future

 

EDMONDS, WA — Aug. 29, 2014 — To mark a half-century of health care service to the community and the groundbreaking for Swedish Edmonds’ largest expansion in 40 years, the community is invited to a celebration on Wednesday, Sept. 10 from 4-6 p.m. The celebration will take place on the east side of the hospital, the future site of a $63.5 million expansion to the existing hospital campus. Celebration activities will include:

  • Groundbreaking ceremony for the planned hospital expansion – a two-story, 77,000-square-foot facility that will include a new emergency department (ED), urgent care, observation unit, outpatient diagnostic imaging center, new lobby, public space, 37,000-square-foot shelled second floor and more

  • Time capsule dedication and hall of history display acknowledging the hospital’s 50-year history and achievements over the decades

  • Refreshments served

KING 5 HealthLink Profiles Focused Ultrasound Research at Swedish

Swedish News

KING 5 TV’s HealthLink program recently aired a segment on a clinical trial being conducted at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute at its Cherry Hill hospital. The study is examining the use of a novel, noninvasive approach to treating brain disorders using focused ultrasound. The concept is appealing to clinicians, as it could provide patients with a less invasive treatment option.

The KING 5 story examines the technology’s application for the treatment of essential tremor, one of the most common movement disorders. Swedish Neuroscience Institute is also studying focused ultrasound for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and brain tumors.

Watch the KING 5 HealthLink story here.

Statement on Swedish Edmonds Construction Accident

Swedish News
At approximately 2 pm today, Swedish Edmonds emergency caregivers responded to a Code Blue (medical emergency) at the construction site adjacent to the hospital after a subcontractor working at the scene was electrocuted after coming in contact with a power line. Due to the presence of live voltage at the scene, caregivers could not access the site and the patient was later declared dead at the scene.

We are deeply saddened by this tragedy and want to express our condolences to the family of the deceased and those affected by this tragedy. We are working closely with Sellen Construction, Edmonds Police Department, Snohomish County Fire District 1, and Labor & Industries to investigate the accident and determine what happened.

Although the accident resulted in temporary disruption of power at some of the outlying buildings on the Swedish Edmonds campus, no care services at the main hospital were impacted aside from a temporary safety pause for cardiac cath lab and some elective procedure patients. Power was completely restored to the campus by 3:45 pm.

Out of respect for the family of the victim, those affected by the accident and the ongoing investigation, Swedish cannot provide additional comment at this time.
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