2013

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Minor & James Medical, a Swedish Health Partner, Welcomes Seattle Urological Associates

October 01, 2013

SEATTLE, Oct. 1, 2013 – Minor & James Medical, a Swedish Health Partner, announced today that Seattle Urological Associates is joining its medical group effective Oct. 1.

As an integrated practice of Minor & James, Seattle Urological Associates can now leverage many of the same resources and health practices that are available to Minor & James physicians and patients, including its electronic health records system, online access to health information and patient services through MyChart, imaging services and more.

Enrollment in the Washington Healthplanfinder begins today

October 01, 2013

Swedish is highlighting the opening of Washington Healthplanfinder. Starting today, uninsured residents in King County can enroll in quality, affordable health plans simply by calling or visiting www.wahealthplanfinder.org. Coverage begins on January 1, 2014.

Swedish has a comprehensive team in place, including in-person assisters trained by the state, to help Swedish hospital or Emergency Department patients sign up for coverage through Washington Healthplanfinder and learn about their options. Swedish is also partnering with local community clinics to help assist new patients and manage their enrollment needs.

PSBJ report details stake in Exchange enrollment for Swedish, hospitals

September 30, 2013

A recent article in the Puget Sound Business Journal details the critical role hospitals are playing in helping King County’s uninsured enroll in health care coverage through the state’s new Health Benefit Exchange (Exchange). In the piece, Swedish’s Tom Gibbon, Medicaid Expansion/Exchange Initiative Leader, highlights how Swedish is helping patients by:

Cholesterol and stroke awareness

September 30, 2013

September is also National Cholesterol Awareness month!

Do you know your numbers? It is important to know your cholesterol levels as they influence your risk of stroke. Talk to your provider today to find out where you stand!

Do you have trouble remembering “good” cholesterol versus “bad” cholesterol? An easy way to keep them straight is to think HDL = happy (“good” cholesterol) and LDL = lousy (“bad” cholesterol). Check out the American Heart Association’s Meet the Fats for memorable information about cholesterol.

How does cholesterol affect stroke risk? Build-up of cholesterol plaque within your arteries increases your risk of stroke by blocking normal blood flow. This reduces the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the affected area.

Swedish Neuroscience Institute Seeks Participants for Trial of an Investigational Technology to Treat Essential Tremor

September 29, 2013

One of only four sites in U.S. to treat neurological disorder

SEATTLE, Sept. 26, 2013 – Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) is looking for patients willing to participate in a study of an investigational technology to treat essential tremor, a common neurological disorder, with sound rather than surgery.

An estimated 10 million people in the U.S have essential tremor (ET), which causes a rhythmic shaking or trembling of hands and arms but can also affect the head, legs and other parts of the body. It affects one out of every 25 adults over 40 and can be confused with but is different from better-known Parkinson’s disease, which is actually much less prevalent. ET produces disabilities that hamper basic daily activities and worsens over time, with severely affected patients unable to feed or care for themselves.

Dr. Ryder Gwinn, the Principle Investigator for the study at SNI who has utilized other treatments for patients with essential tremor, said focused ultrasound could be an option for many of these patients. For example, medication has been shown to be ineffective for up to half of all ET patients.

Atrial fibrillation (afib) awareness

September 23, 2013

September is National Atrial Fibrillation Awareness month!

Atrial fibrillation (afib) is an abnormal heart rhythm that may lead to increased risk of stroke or other heart-related problems.

Common signs and symptoms of afib include:

  • Rapid and irregular heartbeat
  • Fluttering or “thumping” in the chest
  • Faintness, dizziness or weakness
  • Shortness of breath and anxiety
  • Fatigue
  • Chest pain

For individuals with atrial fibrillation or flutter, it is important to maintain a healthy lifestyle. This includes following your healthcare provider's instructions regarding medications, treatments, and maintaining a healthy diet and participating in heart healthy activities.

Active Women, Healthy Women - A Partnership Between Swedish Cancer Institute and Team Survivor Northwest

September 02, 2013

We are happy to announce that Swedish Cancer Institute and Team Survivor Northwest have recently partnered to offer an ongoing fitness program for women cancer survivors at the Swedish Cancer Institute. Certified fitness instructors will assist you in assessing your health and fitness levels to help you reap the benefits of exercise. The focus of Active Women, Healthy Women is on stretching, strength training and cardio workouts. Come enjoy the camaraderie of other women in this safe and supportive environment.

Active Women, Healthy Women is available at the Swedish/First Hill and Swedish/Issaquah campuses and is open to patients, family members and caregivers, free of charge.

Fall 2013 Dates:

Why you should have fiber in your diet

August 30, 2013

Fiber is a general term for the various plant cells that give plants their structure – it helps trees stand up tall, and is what makes fruits and vegetables crunch when you bite into them. No fiber naturally exists in meats or dairy products; fiber is found only in plants. Fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds, along with other foods such as whole grains, are good sources of fiber.

Benefits and Types of Fiber

High fiber foods help to...

Interlocal hospitals announce their decision for potential affiliation

August 29, 2013

Two of the three North Sound public district hospitals, who formed a consortium called the Interlocals, announced a decision today to explore a formal affiliation with PeaceHealth and UW Medicine. Skagit Regional Health and Cascade Valley Hospital will pursue the affiliation.  Island Hospital announced it will not pursue an affiliation at this time.

What's New in Lung Cancer Screening?

August 28, 2013

For too long lung cancer has been detected too late to benefit from the most effective treatments. Screening for lung cancer with Low Dose CT (LDCT) has been shown in large research trials to reverse this trend. There is now cause for optimism that screening has the potential to change the negative statistics around lung cancer.

The current reality is that lung cancer related deaths in our country has surpassed those of prostate, breast, and colon cancers combined. Although smokers are not the only people at risk for lung cancer they are at much higher risk than the average population. In fact, if they have a smoking history of 1 pack per day for 30 years or more, are actively smoking or have quit in the last 15 years and are now 55 years old or older, they are considered in a higher risk group for developing lung cancer and would benefit from being screened to detect lung cancer early and at a treatable state.

The last decade has been pivotal...

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