2013

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Swedish Edmonds Fire Response

November 21, 2013

On Thursday, November 21, the Swedish Edmonds campus experienced a fire isolated in a lower-level, mechanical room at or about 7 PM.

No injuries are reported. Swedish Edmonds medical staff and emergency personnel have acted quickly to ensure the safety of all patients and medical staff.

There is smoke damage at the hospital, resulting in a partial patient evacuation, with transfers expected to both Swedish Ballard and Providence Everett facilities. We have confirmed that 11 patients from the Swedish Edmonds Emergency Department have been transferred to Providence Everett, and 1 OB patient to Swedish Ballard.

We are currently still confirming if additional patient transfers will be necessary. Current power outages in the hospital are not affecting patient safety.

(11/22/13 7:30 AM) Update: The majority of Swedish Edmonds is running on power. A portion of the hospital is currently without power. Patient safety is not affected at this time. Hospital staff and leaders continue to work quickly to restore power to all parts of the Swedish Edmonds campus.

Swedish Ballard Offers Open House Tonight for Expanded Oncology and Treatment Center

November 12, 2013

The Ballard community is invited to a sneak peek of the new Swedish Cancer Institute (SCI) Medical Oncology and Treatment Center from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. tonight - Tuesday, Nov. 12 - at Swedish Ballard, 5300 Tallman Ave. N.W., 2nd Floor.

Swedish Ballard has been providing cancer services to the community for more than 35 years. As a part of the continuing mission to provide world-class cancer care close to home, we are expanding our cancer treatment services at Ballard through the new Swedish Cancer Institute Medical Oncology and Treatment Center. This new space is an impressive 8,000+ square foot integrated facility that includes:

  • Clinic space for 5 medical oncologists
  • 13 infusions bays
  • 2 private rooms with hospital beds
  • Convenient, street-level access
  • Patient drop-off location

Medical oncologists and staff will be available to answer questions. We look forward to seeing you!

Swedish Organ Transplant Program Celebrates 40 Years of Kidney Transplantation, Receives Medicare Certification for Liver Services

November 08, 2013

SEATTLE — November 7, 2013 — Swedish Medical Center’s organ transplant program is celebrating two milestones this month – the 40th anniversary of its kidney transplant program and recent approval of its liver transplant program by Medicare.

Swedish is a longstanding leader in organ transplantation in the Pacific Northwest, particularly kidney transplantation. Now operating for 40 years, the kidney transplant program is the most experienced of its kind in the region treating more than 100 patients each year.

The recent approval by Medicare comes five years after the Washington Supreme Court approved the liver program’s certificate of need in 2008. The first liver transplant performed at Swedish was in September 2010.

Swedish Physician Named Bariatrician of the Year

November 07, 2013

Richard Lindquist, M.D. and medical program director of Swedish Weight Loss Services was named Bariatrician of the Year by the American Society of Bariatric Physicians (ASBP) in October.

Linquist, who serves on the ASBP Board of Trustees, accepted the award in Denver during a ceremony attended by more than 500 obesity medicine specialists last month. Bariatrics is the branch of medicine responsible for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of obesity.

What are the options when lung cancer is inoperable?

November 06, 2013

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month and for those who have been diagnosed with lung cancer, one dreaded word is inoperable. Many feel defeated when they hear they are not candidates for surgery, but promising non-surgical treatments are available. CyberKnife, a form of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), is one of these options.

Radiation treatment to a moving target adds a level of complexity. However, CyberKnife tracks a tumor and directs targeted radiation via a state of the art robotic arm. Most patients complete their treatment in 3 to 5 days.

Highly focused radiation has become the standard of care for treating medically inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer with excellent results.

This video demonstrates the robotic real-time tracking of the CyberKnife. If you have questions about this treatment option, please contact us at 206-320-7130.

Swedish Sports Concussion Clinic

November 05, 2013

The Sports Concussion Clinic at Swedish Spine, Sports & Musculoskeletal Medicine was developed to provide comprehensive concussion management and help guide return-to-play decisions for children and adults. We are a team of sports medicine physicians, physiatrists, physical therapists, and a neuropsychologist that deliver individual care for athletes. We provide physical evaluation, assessment of concussion severity, neuropsychological evaluation, ongoing monitoring and education for athletes, parents, coaches and school staff. We use clinical guidelines to implement the most appropriate treatment for return-to-play and return-to-school. Click here to learn more or to make an appointment.

Children's Clinic of South Snohomish County Joins Swedish Medical Group

November 04, 2013

Swedish Medical Group (SMG), a division of Swedish Health Services, has acquired the Children’s Clinic of South Snohomish County in Edmonds, Wash.

The newly named Swedish Children's Clinic - Edmonds will continue to provide the same level of care and quality doctors that its patients have come to rely upon since the 1960s. By joining Swedish, the children’s clinic can access many of the same shared resources as other SMG members including electronic medical records.

What should I do about a thyroid nodule?

November 01, 2013

Thyroid nodules are extremely common and studies have shown that about half of us have at least one!

Fortunately, most of these nodules do not pose any health risks. Not all thyroid nodules are benign, however, and in a minority of cases (about 5-15%) may contain a cancer. The challenge, of course, is figuring out which nodules are cause for concern and which ones are not.

With increased use of high-resolution imaging, more nodules are being identified today than ever before. It is also not uncommon for someone to learn they have a nodule “incidentally” after a CT scan, MRI or ultrasound that was performed for some other medical reason.

If you think you may have a thyroid nodule, or if one has been found incidentally by medical imaging, you should make an appointment to see your doctor. Your doctor will likely take several steps, including:

Breast cancer awareness is about information, not a color

October 30, 2013

In recent years, the colors of October seem to have changed from red, orange, and gold to pink, pink and more pink. I have always loved pink, well before becoming a breast cancer surgeon, but like many of us, I find the pink of October overwhelming, especially at this point in the month.

I appreciate and endorse the continued focus on breast cancer, but often the important information is drowned out by the rah-rah-rah of the awareness campaigns. Many women (and men) are “aware” of breast cancer, but never truly become aware of what it really is, what it really means, until they find themselves dealing with the cold terror of a palpable mass or a call-back after mammogram. They need information, not just pink blenders.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the US, affecting 1 in 8 women in their lifetime. Breast cancer usually involves cells that line the milk ducts or lobules which then undergo mutations that escape the body’s usual self-protection mechanism. These cells develop the ability to multiply rapidly, grow, invade, attract blood vessels for nutrients, and set up camp elsewhere in the body.

Cornea Surgeon at Swedish Medical Center Successfully Implants FDA-Approved Telescope for Macular Degeneration

October 28, 2013

SEATTLE – October 28, 2013 – Dr. Thomas Gillette, cornea surgeon at Swedish Medical Center and Eye Associates Northwest, P.C. in Seattle, Wash. successfully implanted a tiny telescope into the eye of an end-stage macular degeneration (AMD) patient. The patient, 76-year-old Charles DePoe, had his surgery in October 2012 at Swedish. DePoe is a resident of Kennewick, Wash. and is the first and only in the state to have received the telescope implant. DePoe, who had lost nearly all of his central vision, set a goal with his surgeon, Dr. Gillette, for the implant. He wished to gain enough of his central vision back to once again recognize his wife’s face and read the newspaper.

“We know the impact the telescope technology can have on a patient’s life. We are excited to finally be able to offer this technology on a broader basis and to be one of the first provider teams in the Pacific Northwest to help patients improve their vision and achieve a greater quality of life,” says Dr. Gillette. “More than 15 million Americans are affected by some form of AMD, and it is the leading cause of blindness in older Americans.”

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