Blog

Getting the most out of your appointment

Bobbie (Barbara) J. Severson, ARNP

Bobbie (Barbara) J. Severson, ARNP
ARNP, Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center

I was recently asked if I could provide advice on how patients could get the most out of their Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center visits.  In reality, I think most of us have been patients at least once in our lives. The list of tips I provide is comprehensive. However, critical information may be missing.  If you notice omissions, please respond with your own advice in the comments since we can all learn from each other.
 
One of the most important MS life survival lessons is that we are all part of the same team. As a member of that team, our goal is to equip you with the knowledge and skills to live your life to the fullest. This starts with the MS Center visit. Where you go with the information, is all part of our journey together:

Seattle Brain Cancer Walk Raises $530,000 for Brain Cancer Research

Swedish News

Funds will advance the search for new treatment options and improve patient care


SEATTLE — Sept. 26, 2014 — More than 3,000 walkers filled Seattle Center’s Next 50 Plaza on Sept. 20 for the 7th Annual Seattle Brain Cancer Walk. The walk raised more than $530,000, with 100 percent of the funds supporting research at the Ben & Catherine Ivy Center for Advanced Brain Tumor Treatment at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute (Ivy Center).
 
“The Seattle Brain Cancer Walk is an opportunity to celebrate the patients and families who are all affected by this devastating disease,” said Charles Cobbs, M.D., medical director of the Ivy Center. “The funds raised will make a direct impact on our research at the Ivy Center, and will help us push toward breakthroughs to better treat, and hopefully cure this disease.”
 
According to the American Brain Tumor Association, brain tumors are the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Americans under the age of 20; the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men ages 20-39; and the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women ages 20-39.
 
Prior to the opening of the Ivy Center in 2008, clinical trials for patients with brain tumors were extremely limited in the Pacific Northwest. To date, the Ivy Center has provided access to 15 community-based clinical trials of experimental new therapies for patients diagnosed with brain cancer.

What is ALS and why did it inspire ice bucket challenges at Swedish?

Michelle Scheff

Michelle Scheff
Speech Pathologist

Employees of Swedish Cherry Hill Outpatient Rehabilitation and Neurology Departments took the plunge and participated in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge to raise awareness of ALS and funding for ALS research.  (Click here to see their video on Facebook.)




Before the ALS clinic team takes the ice bucket challenge
 
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), most commonly referred to as “Lou Gehrig’s Disease”, is a progressive neurodegenerative disease which affects the motor neurons responsible for voluntary movements and muscle power. As the disease progresses, individuals living with ALS may lose their ability to move and control the muscles of their extremities, torso, head and mouth which can make completion of basic activities such as walking, eating, talking and even breathing very difficult.

Unfortunately, the disease has no cure and only one medication has been approved for the treatment of ALS. Research is making strides towards understanding the underlying physiology and genetic makeup of the disease. Because of  ...

Treatment options for hemifacial spasm

Dean Hamilton, ARNP

Dean Hamilton, ARNP
ARNP, Swedish Cerebrovascular Center

Hemifacial spasm is the involuntary contractions of the muscles of the face, those innervated by the facial nerve (VII). The facial spasms are intermittent and occur on one side of the face only. Hemifacial spasm can involve the upper or lower half of the face and may progress to involve the entire half of the face. The intensity and frequency of these symptoms can increase over time and can persist even during sleep. Hemifacial spasm can be associated with vestibular dysfunction and cochlear dysfunction.
 
Hemifacial spasm is usually more common in women. The most common cause of hemifacial spasm is ...

KING 5 HealthLink Profiles Focused Ultrasound Research at Swedish

Swedish News

KING 5 TV’s HealthLink program recently aired a segment on a clinical trial being conducted at the Swedish Neuroscience Institute at its Cherry Hill hospital. The study is examining the use of a novel, noninvasive approach to treating brain disorders using focused ultrasound. The concept is appealing to clinicians, as it could provide patients with a less invasive treatment option.

The KING 5 story examines the technology’s application for the treatment of essential tremor, one of the most common movement disorders. Swedish Neuroscience Institute is also studying focused ultrasound for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and brain tumors.

Watch the KING 5 HealthLink story here.

Swedish Launches Studies Examining Focused Ultrasound as a Potential Treatment for Parkinson’s disease, Brain Tumors

Swedish News

Swedish Neuroscience Institute leads national ultrasound technology research

 
News Release
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                                          
 

Contact: Clay Holtzman, Swedish, (206) 998-5028, clay.holtzman@swedish.org

SEATTLE — July 30, 2014 — The Swedish Neuroscience Institute (SNI) is expanding its study of focused ultrasound as a novel treatment for brain disorders with the opening of two clinical trials examining the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and brain tumors. The new trials add to the institute’s ongoing study of focused ultrasound for a treatment of essential tremor (ET).
 
“SNI is one of the few locations in the world where focused ultrasound is being studied at this level. These efforts exemplify SNI’s ongoing mission to deliver leading edge treatment for brain and spinal conditions,” said David Newell, M.D., Chief of Neurosciences at SNI. “We are honored to be a pioneer in this field and are eager to produce translational results.”
 
These trials come after SNI launched a study last year examining focused ultrasound’s potential as a treatment for essential tremor, a common neurological disorder resulting in involuntary shaking. The original study was designed to determine viability and safety of ultrasound treatment in improving the quality of life for those affected. Together, these three studies place SNI at the forefront of clinical care providers studying focused ultrasound as a treatment approach.

Drug treatment and weight loss restores vision in a blinding disorder linked to obesity

Steven R. Hamilton

As many as 100,000 Americans suffer from a disorder called pseudotumor cerebri or idiopathic intracranial hypertension that can cause permanent blindness and chronic headaches. The disease primarily strikes obese women of reproductive age with symptoms of daily headaches, visual symptoms including transient blurring or blindness, double vision, and pulsating noises in one’s head. Up to 5-10% of these patients may have permanent visual loss due to optic nerve damage.
 
A recent national trial funded by the National Institute of Health’s National Eye Institute has shown that a common water pill, acetazolamide, combined with a moderate but comprehensive dietary and lifestyle modification plan can restore and preserve vision in women with this disease. I was one of the local investigators for this trial along with Dr. Eugene May.
 
The symptoms of pseudotumor cerebri are thought to be due to high spinal fluid pressure around the optic nerves and brain due to impaired reabsorption of spinal fluid that is continuously being produced within the brain. This results in chronic headaches and swelling of the optic nerves that can lead to permanent blindness if left untreated. Patients typically are ...

Results 1-7 of 50

Learn more about the Swedish blog

Swedish has a social media policy

See who is blogging at Swedish

   Keep up with Swedish:

    Check out the Swedish blog

Find a Physician

              Subscribe to
             HealthWatch