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New robotic system for catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias - Sterotaxis

Adam H. Zivin, MD, FACC, FHRS

Swedish recently completed a major upgrade to the Cardiac Electrophysiology Lab at Cherry Hill and is now the only hospital in Washington State with the Stereotaxis system.  This system is a remote navigation (robotic) system used for catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias. In contrast to conventional ablation catheters which are steered by the physician using pull wires in the catheter and manual advancement and retraction, the Stereotaxis system accomplishes this hands-free using ...

Treating Cardiac Arrhythmias with catheter ablation

Adam H. Zivin, MD, FACC, FHRS

Cardiac catheter ablation is an invasive procedure done to treat abnormal rapid or irregular heart rhythms (arrhythmias). Ablation can be used to treat both supraventricular arrhythmias coming from the upper chambers of the heart (atria) including paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT), atrial flutter, and atrial fibrillation, and ventricular arrhythmias coming from the lower chambers (ventricles).


Different types of catheter ablation for cardiac arrhythmias

“Ablation” refers to localized destruction of tissue, so the area that is being ablated needs to be carefully targeted and the ablation closely controlled. The precise areas targeted for ablation depend on the type of arrhythmia, which sometimes is known before the procedure, but often needs to be clarified or confirmed invasively during the procedure. That being said, not all tachycardias are amenable to ablation or even require treatment, but when non-drug treatment of appropriate tachycardias is appropriate, catheter ablation can be an excellent option.

Ablation can be performed either with ...

Swedish Cherry Hill Named Top Hospital for Heart Surgery

Swedish News

In its first ever rating of hospitals for heart surgery, Consumer Reports has identified Swedish/Cherry Hill as one of the top hospitals in the country for heart surgery. The publication, using data from the independent Society of Thoracic Surgeons, surveyed 400 hospitals and gave Swedish Cherry Hill ‘Above Average’ ratings (the highest possible) for aortic valve replacement and cardiac bypass surgery.

Swedish Cherry Hill was the only hospital in Washington State to receive such a rating by Consumer Reports.

KOMO TV recently profiled the report and interviewed Swedish’s Glenn Barnhart, M.D., chief of cardiac surgery. See the news story here.

When stress takes a toll on your heart

Paul Huang, MD

Paul Huang, MD
Interventional Cardiologist & Medical Director, Swedish Heart & Vascular

When you face danger, your body’s built-in alarm system triggers the production of adrenalin and cortisol. Adrenalin makes your heart beat faster and cortisol produces sugar to help you physically and mentally react. Your body returns to normal when the danger is over.

Unlike cavemen, barbarians and knights, we don’t face extreme danger very often. Unfortunately, every-day stress also triggers your alarm system.

Work. Commute. Kids. Relatives. Friends. Death of a loved one. Money. Everything in life can cause stress.

Stress takes a toll on your body — including your heart. Because stress can linger, your body continues to produce extra adrenalin and cortisol.

When your body’s alarm system doesn’t turn off, you may eat more, exercise less, lose sleep, argue more, forget things, get depressed, or smoke or drink more than usual. These things put an added burden on your heart and increase your risk of heart disease. Recent studies have shown that laughter and positive thinking promote heart health, while anger and job stress can increase the risk of heart attacks.

Here are some tips to protect your heart from stress:

Are you at risk for heart disease?

Nimish Muni, MD

Nimish Muni, MD
Cardiologist

About half of all Americans have at least one of the three main risk factors for heart disease: high blood pressure, high cholesterol and smoking. Other risk factors include diabetes, overweight/obesity, poor diet, inactivity, alcohol use and family history.

More people die from heart disease than any other medical condition. Controlling these risk factors is the most effective method of prevention.

What is your risk for heart disease? Find out by taking a free online Heart Risk Test.

If you need care, we have a team of cardiologists who can evaluate your risk, show you how to reduce that risk, and help you take the first steps to a healthy future.

Five tips for finding a cardiologist:

  1. Convenience. Care close to home or work makes life easier. Swedish has more than 35 cardiologists in 20 locations throughout the Greater Puget Sound area.

  2. Credentials. Cardiologists at Swedish are board certified by their national professional organizations.

  3. Quality. The American College of Cardiology has recognized Swedish cardiologists for being leaders in safe, high-quality care that reduces the risk of death among heart patients. Find out more about our quality outcomes.

  4. Reputation ...

Swedish Inviting 15 People to Become ‘Heart Surgeons for a Day’

Swedish News

Bellingham Herald Profiles Dr. Mark Reisman, First MitraClip Surgery in Washington

Swedish News

The Bellingham Herald recently published an interview with Swedish Heart & Vascular Institute’s Mark Reisman, M.D., as well as his patient Mavis Arfman, recipient of the first MitraClip heart valve device in Washington state. Arfman is a resident of Bellingham.

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