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KING 5, PSBJ Cover Swedish’s Level IV NICU Designation

Swedish News

KING 5’s Teresa Yuan reports on Swedish’s newly designated Level IV neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), one of only two serving the region. The NICU is located at Swedish’s First Hill hospital in Seattle.

Watch the KING 5 clip here.

Last week Puget Sound Business Journal reporter Greg Lamm covered the new designation.

Read the PSBJ story here.

KOMO 4 Covers Swedish ‘POEM’ Procedure

Swedish News

KOMO 4’s Molly Shen tells viewers about a new procedure being offered at Swedish Medical Center. Per oral endoscopic myotomy (also known as ‘POEM’) is only being offered in Washington State at Swedish.

View the clip on KOMO 4 here.

Olaparib Tablet Safe in Pretreated Ovarian Cancer Patients; More Effective in Those With BRCA Mutations

Swedish News

American Association for Cancer Research News Release


SEATTLE —  Sept. 9, 2014 — An oral tablet form of a PARP inhibitor, olaparib, given in combination with chemotherapy, was safe in heavily pretreated ovarian cancer patients, and patients with BRCA mutations may have a better response compared with those without a BRCA mutation, according to phase Ib clinical trial data presented at the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research-AACR 10th Biennial Ovarian Cancer Research Symposium, held Sept. 8-9.

“This study is one of the first studies to use olaparib tablets instead of olaparib capsules,” said Saul Rivkin, MD, founder and chairman of the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research, and a research scientist at the Swedish Cancer Institute, both in Seattle, Washington. “The goal was to find the maximum tolerated dose of olaparib tablets plus weekly metronomic carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with relapsed ovarian cancer.

“This treatment regimen provided a response rate of 66 percent in heavily pretreated ovarian cancer patients. It was surprisingly tolerable with no grade 4 toxicities,” said Rivkin.

“The outlook for ovarian cancer patients with advanced disease is not equivalent to that of breast cancer, and a lot of work needs to be done to improve the cure rate,” Rivkin added. “Medical researchers are discovering and investigating new and innovative therapies for the treatment of ovarian cancer. We are constantly working toward improving the quality of life and survival for all ovarian cancer patients.”

Swedish Cancer Institute Launches New Hematologic Malignancies Program

Swedish News

International hematology expert Dr. John Pagel recruited to expand Swedish’s treatment for, and research on, blood cancers

 

SEATTLE — September 8, 2014 — The Swedish Cancer Institute is launching a Hematologic Malignancies program for the expanded treatment and research of blood-based cancers such as leukemia, multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Newly recruited international hematology expert John Pagel, M.D., Ph.D., will serve as chief of the new program, which launches this month.
 
“Dr. Pagel brings with him a world-class reputation for research and excellence in patient care,” said Swedish Cancer Institute Executive Director Thomas Brown, M.D. “This new program will add to our existing strengths in caring for patients with hematologic malignancies and further develop our autologous hematopoietic stem cell program. These efforts allow the Swedish Cancer Institute to continue providing the most versatile and comprehensive cancer care in the Pacific Northwest.”
 
Dr. Pagel’s practice will include caring for patients with acute and chronic leukemias, multiple myeloma, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, and myelodysplastic syndromes, as well as other myeloproliferative disorders. In addition to providing established treatments such as autologous stem cell transplants, the program will develop novel therapies for the treatment of blood-based diseases through research collaborations and studies initiated by Swedish Cancer Institute physicians.

Swedish Provides Washington’s First ‘POEM’ Procedure

Swedish News

Per oral endoscopic myotomy could help a range of esophageal, stomach disorders


SEATTLE — September 05, 2014— Swedish surgeons became the first in Washington State to perform a Per Oral Endoscopic Myotomy (POEM) procedure when they successfully treated a 36-year-old patient diagnosed with a rare esophageal disorder known as achalasia.
 
POEM involves inserting an endoscope in the patient’s esophagus through the mouth. Once in place, surgeons use several instruments placed though a channel in the endoscope to treat the affected area. In the case of Washington’s first patient to undergo the procedure, a team of Swedish surgeons led by Ralph Aye, M.D., and Brian Louie, M.D., cut though the inner wall of the esophagus to place the endoscope between the inner esophageal layer and the outer muscular wall. By cutting the inner most muscle layer, pressure created by the valve between the esophagus and the stomach was relieved and the patient’s case was treated successfully.
 
Previously, patients with achalasia were treated using five minimally invasive incisions through the abdominal wall. But because POEM does not require any external incisions, patients can recover quicker with similarly successful outcomes.

Swedish First Hill NICU Earns Level IV Designation

Swedish News

Washington State Department of Health designates Swedish First Hill as a top care center for newborns


SEATTLE — September 4, 2014Swedish Medical Center announced today that the Washington State Department of Health has designated its First Hill neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as a Level IV regional NICU. This designation places Swedish First Hill among an elite group of care centers in Washington – and one of only two facilities in Seattle – with the capabilities to provide the highest level of treatment for critically ill and premature newborns.
 
“Infants born early or with life-threatening conditions need instant access to specialized care and a gifted team of caregivers,” said Melissa Cate, R.N., M.N., MBA, system administrative director for Women’s, Infants and Children’s Services at Swedish Medical Center. “Swedish First Hill is honored to provide the highest level of neonatal services to families in this region.”
 
Swedish First Hill is Washington’s largest NICU, with more than 75 NICU beds. The facility treats an average of 26 babies requiring Level IV treatment and 27 babies in need of Level III care each day. With its combined birth centers at Ballard, Edmonds, First Hill and Issaquah, Swedish provides care for more than 9,000 families each year.

KOMO 4 TV interviews Dr. Renee Low about concussions in soccer

Swedish News

Watch the KOMO 4 TV clip of Swedish neuropsychologist Renee Low, M.D., interviewing with anchor Eric Johnson about the dangers of concussions in soccer and the importance of baseline testing.

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