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5th Annual Multiple Sclerosis Center Art Show 2014

Bobbie (Barbara) J. Severson, ARNP

Bobbie (Barbara) J. Severson, ARNP
ARNP, Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center

The Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center is hosting the 5th annual MS Center Art Show on August 9 & 10 from 10 am to 6 pm at the Seattle Center Armory.  The event is free and open to the public.  Please join us for this yearly celebration of art that is created by people living with MS and all others affected by this disease.
 
Art frees the spirit even when MS tries to limit it. The MS Center at Swedish hopes to acknowledge the lives and talents of everyone affected by MS.  The Art Show will feature over 80 pieces of art including painting, photography, sculpture, jewelry, and more. 
 
The purpose of the annual Swedish MS Center Art Show is to:

Protect your hearing at Seattle's Seafair

Kristiina Huckabay, AuD, FAAA
Blue Angels! Cheering fans! Hydroplanes! Live music! Fireworks! Along with the excitement Seafair brings to Seattle, it also brings a lot of noise! The otolaryngologists and audiologists at Swedish Otolaryngology want you to enjoy these events, while protecting your precious hearing. The sound of a jet engine can be up to 120 dB at take-off and even 30 seconds of exposure to this sound can cause permanent noise damage (American Academy of Audiology website).
 


Here are some tips for protecting your hearing:

Wear ...

Don’t Leave Your Child in a Hot Car – Understanding the Risks & Consequences

Jayne Blackburn, MSN, RN, CCRN

Jayne Blackburn, MSN, RN, CCRN
Pediatric ICU Charge Nurse

In the span of this hot weather streak, we all need a quick refresher and reminder about how quickly children can suffer from heatstroke if left in a hot car.  Every summer, there are multiple occasions where children are left in hot cars for a myriad of “excuses” by adults.  In 2014 alone there have been 18 deaths of children related to heatstroke obtained by being left alone in a hot car. 

Here are some things you must know:

  1.  No matter how brief – there are no exceptions!  Some adults may think that taking the child in/out of their car seat is cumbersome and they are correct, even if it for what they believe is a “quick stop”.  But, remember – the stakes are too high!  The car temperatures can get very hot in a very short period of time.  There is no safe amount of time to leave children alone in a car.

(Did you know? In 10 minutes a car can heat up 20+ degrees Fahrenheit.  Even if it is only 60 degrees outside, the inside of a car can heat up to approximately 110 degrees. “Cracking” the windows does very little to keep the car cool.)

How to deal with gas and bloating

Margaret Gorham, ARNP
We all have occasional gas, usually from something we have eaten, but many people feel that they pass too much gas or burp too frequently. Intestinal gas can result in abdominal pain, bloating and embarrassment.
 
The amount of gas produced by the body depends upon your diet and other factors. Most people with symptoms of excessive gas do not produce more gas than the average person, but are more aware of normal amounts of gas.
 
Where does the gas come from?

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in Head and Neck Cancer

Joseph C. Sniezek
Cancer of the oropharynx (throat) has undergone a drastic and dramatic change over the last decade.  In the past, most throat cancers were linked with prolonged cigarette smoking and alcohol use.  Now, the occurrence of throat cancer is rising and 80-90% is likely caused by an infection with Human Papillomavirus (HPV).  Many high-profile personalities, including actor Michael Douglas, have recently revealed that they have experienced HPV-related throat cancer.

What causes HPV-related Oropharynx cancer?

Infection with the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is known to cause genital warts and lead to various genital cancers, but now it appears to also cause the majority of throat cancers.  The types of HPV that lead to throat cancer are generally sexually transmitted, though some researchers believe that even kissing may result in HPV transmission.   The time period from HPV exposure to the development of a throat cancer is often decades. Although the cancer may be slow-growing, it is important to have annual check-ups with your physician and dentist who can assess your oral health appropriately. 
 
How is HPV-related Oropharynx cancer treated?


HPV-related throat cancer can ...

How to prevent food poisoning

Whitney Carter, RN, BSN

Whitney Carter, RN, BSN
Clinical Registered Nurse for Pediatric General Surgery

Many of us are aware of the recent nationwide recall of peaches and other fruit due to the potential of bacterial contamination.  Although thankfully, no illnesses have been reported so far, I’d like to take this opportunity to refresh our knowledge about ways to avoid food borne illness or food poisoning.

 
According to The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), food poisoning affects approximately 1 in 6 Americans every year. Often it results in relatively mild symptoms such as nausea, diarrhea and vomiting that resolve within a day or so. However, food poisoning can also lead to more dangerous and even deadly outcomes, which is why food safety is so important! 
 
So how should we protect our family from food borne illness?   It’s pretty easy!  Just remember 4 basic steps:  clean, separate, cook and chill!

Talking to kids about traumatic world events

Stephanie Wilding, MS, CCLS

Stephanie Wilding, MS, CCLS
Certified Child Life Specialist

From Hurricane Sandy, shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School, Boston Marathon bombing, the Oso mudslide and most recently the shooting at Seattle Pacific University, so often now we are given immediate access and awareness to traumatic and sudden events happening around the world and right in our own communities.  As parents we play an essential role in helping our children cope with stress and the emotions that come with a traumatic event.  Sometimes we think it would be better for them not to know about these things or that talking about will make it worse, but it’s important to respect their reactions and provide a place for them to talk about it. 

Why is it important to talk with my child? 

Talking to your child is an important first step in helping them understand and process any life event and especially a large scale traumatic event.  Your child may have already heard about the event through school, social media, friends or other sources.  Taking the initiative to talk with them allows you the opportunity to clarify the facts, answer questions and provides them a chance to share their own feelings. 

What should I tell my child?

Knowing ...
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