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5th Annual Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center Art Show

Mallory Higgins

Mallory Higgins
Education Coordinator and Marketing Specialist, Swedish MS Center

With over eighty art work submissions this year, the 5th annual Multiple Sclerosis Center Art Show was, again, a great success. Held at the Seattle Center Armory this past weekend, the exhibit showcased art work created by MS patients, family, friends, and members of the community affected by the disease. This event is held each year to provide community and regional awareness about MS and to provide an opportunity for those affected to express themselves through art. Displayed on white walls and under glass vitrines, artists showcased paintings, collages, sculpture, jewelry, ceramics, textiles, poetry, graphics, and photography among other multi-media compositions. As always, the show is free and art work is welcomed from all individuals of all ability levels in the Pacific Northwest. Participants need not be a patient of Swedish, merely influenced or touched by Multiple Sclerosis.

Although a lifelong disease, the event hopes to convey that multiple sclerosis (MS) is not life-ending. Resources are available to support patients and their families. The Swedish MS Center goes beyond health care to assist people living with MS and related neurological conditions and to help them achieve their highest level of well-being.

Following  ...

What you can do about nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Carolyn Anderson, ARNP

Carolyn Anderson, ARNP
Swedish Gastroenterology

Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is a term used to describe the presence of fat accumulation in the liver. NAFLD affects approximately 20-30% of United States population, and is most commonly diagnosed between 40 – 50 years of age. Recent studies have shown an even distribution of NAFLD between men and women.
 
A healthy liver may contain some fat. However, NAFLD occurs when the liver has trouble breaking down fats, causing excess fat to build-up in the liver. Mild fat accumulation usually does not result in inflammation of the liver. More severe fat accumulation can cause inflammation, and potential progression to cirrhosis (scarring of liver tissue). People who drink too much alcohol can get a condition similar to NAFLD, but NAFLD happens in people who do not drink alcohol or only a little alcohol.
 
We still have much to learn about the specific cause of NAFLD, but it is often associated with:

Bike the US for MS donates $20,000 to Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Center

Mallory Higgins

Mallory Higgins
Education Coordinator and Marketing Specialist, Swedish MS Center

Cyclists participating in Bike the US for MS arrived at the Peddler Brewing Company in Ballard, Washington last Monday, some having travelled all the way from Bar Harbor, Maine. There to greet the cyclists was Dr. James Bowen, Swedish Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Center Neurologist and Medical Director. To date, the bike tour has contributed $80,000 to the Swedish MS Center helping ensure that patients in the Pacific Northwest have access to vital MS services today as well as into the future.


Bike the US for MS is ...

The Science and the Art of Exceptional Cancer Care

Jeffery C. Ward
Not long ago, I read two articles, one by a cancer doctor and another by a journalist. They both left me steaming a bit.  In medicine, we talk about the science (the factual database and knowledge that we use) and the art of medicine (how we use and adapt that database to the benefit of individual and different patients). Both of these articles, the first overtly and the second more indirectly, suggested that the art of medicine is about hiding the science from the patient in order to provide hope, albeit false hope to the cancer victim. Let me state clearly, despite paternalistic instincts, dishonesty has no place in the practice of oncology.

Both of my grandmothers died from cancer. Grandma S. died of stomach cancer when I was in college. As far as I know, she was never told that her cancer had recurred after surgery. Her second husband and family wanted it that way. “Knowing that she has cancer will devastate her, let her have her hope,” we were told. When my cousins and I visited, we were under strict orders to not ask too many questions about her “gall stone” problems. She knew though. You could see it in Grandma’s eyes. But the web that had been woven kept her from being able to grieve and gave no opportunity for good byes. As she slipped away she became withdrawn and depressed.

Grandma B. was diagnosed with an aggressive lymphoma when I was just out of medical school and in my training. She was fully informed by her doctors. She had opportunity to seek second opinions. She conferenced with her children. When she chose to not leave her little ranch valley in Idaho for desperate treatments far from home, and to die in her own home, her family rallied around her in support. For six weeks, she narrated her life history, wrapping up a legacy of lasting value for her family. She was the recipient of an outpouring of love from her community and she died fulfilled, with a smile of satisfaction on her face.

The science and art of medicine are ...

How to treat babies with forceful vomiting (pyloric stenosis)

Angela M. Hanna
Pyloric Stenosis (or infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis) is a condition characterized by forceful vomiting in an infant due to hypertrophy of the pylorus muscle leading to gastric outlet obstruction. This means the muscle where the stomach empties into the small intestine becomes too thick and prevents emptying. As a result, after eating, the baby vomits. The reason for this happening is not known but is likely caused by many things and family history can play a role. Pyloric stenosis is rare, occurring in about 3 of  every 1,000 live births, and most often occurs between the ages of 3-6 weeks, is more common in males, and 1/3 of the time occurs in a first-born child.
 
Vomit from pyloric stenosis usually consists of just milk or formula. Any vomit with color should raise suspicion for other diagnoses. Parents report vomiting from pyloric stenosis as forceful and projectile. Infants are often hungry after vomiting, wanting to continue eating, however eating usually continues the cycle of vomiting.
 
How to treat pyloric stenosis
 
To ...

PALB2 Gene Mutation & Breast Cancer: What it Means For You

Robert Resta

Robert Resta
Genetic Counselor

PALB2 is a gene that was first linked to hereditary breast cancer risk back in 2007. Today’s Seattle Times reports on a recent study about PALB2 that was just published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study, the largest to date, detailed the breast cancer risks faced by  women – and to a lesser extent, men – who carry a mutation in their PALB2 gene. The breast cancer risks were several times greater than the ~12% risk faced by all women, and varied with the woman’s age and family history. Currently, there is no consistent evidence to suggest  that men or women who carry a single PALB2 gene mutation are at greater risks of developing ovarian or other cancers.
 
PALB2 genetic testing can provide very important information that can help women and their families better understand and reduce their risks of developing breast cancer. However, even among women with a very strong personal or family history of breast cancer, very few will test positive. Studies suggest that only about 1-3% of high risk women  will carry a PALB2 mutation. In my personal experience, I have tested about 300 high risk women for PALB2 mutations, and ...

Summer, sun, and skin cancer - what you should know

Andrew R. Ting, MD, FACS

Andrew R. Ting, MD, FACS
General Surgeon

It is easy to get carried away enjoying the string of lovely sunny summer days we have had in Seattle. Our sun is strong, and our unprotected skin vulnerable to UV damage that can lead to sun damage and perhaps skin cancers. Skin cancers fall into the broad categories of squamous cell cancer, basal cell cancer and melanoma. Each of these cancers are usually surgically excised or destroyed by either a dermatologist or general surgeon.

How to tell if a skin lesion is concerning

Warning signs include moles larger than a pencil eraser head, change in size, change in color, itching, bleeding or scab forming over the mole. Areas of particular concern include face, neck, back and extremities. However, skin cancers can also develop in areas where the sun does not shine.

What to do if I have a skin cancer?

If you have a mole or skin lesion that is concerning, bring it up with your family physician who may biopsy it or refer you ..
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