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Pivotal time for chronic hepatitis C treatment

Trang Chau, ARNP

Trang Chau, ARNP
ARNP, Swedish Gastroenterology

An estimated 2.7-3.9 million people in the US are chronically infected with hepatitis C.*  Patients are often diagnosed incidentally, when they donate blood, get life insurance or get a routine physical exam with blood tests showing normal or abnormal liver enzymes.  They may have been diagnosed many years ago with non-A, non-B hepatitis, but forgot about it, never followed up, or did not mention it to their regular health care provider.  In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) issued additional recommendations to start screening “Baby Boomers,” those born between 1945-1965.  Though Baby Boomers account for 3.25% of the US population, they account for 3/4 of the hepatitis C infections.*

Patients may have seen a health care provider in the past and told that there is no treatment, that treatments were not effective, or not worthwhile due to side effects.  Patients have been reluctant to seek treatment because they have heard about the terrible side effects associated with treatment, including flu-like symptoms, fatigue, depression, muscle aches, rashes, etc, lasting up to a year. 

However, this is a pivotal time for hepatitis C patients because treatment has improved by leaps and bounds.  In late 2013, two ...

Breast Cancer Survival Guide: Physical & Clinical Updates

Tanya Wahl

A diagnosis of breast cancer sets into motion a whirlwind of appointments, tests, surgeries and possibly chemotherapy and radiation treatment. A new study reviewed the timeline between surgery and initiating chemotherapy for different subtypes of breast cancer and found a survival advantage when chemotherapy was initiated within 30 days of surgery. Although treating within the 30-60 post-surgical window did not show a statistically significant survival advantage, there is a trend towards better outcomes. Exceeding 60 days post treatment had a negative impact on survival. The clinical impact of timing is most relevant for patients with stage II and III breast cancer, triple negative breast cancer and HER2-positive tumors.
 
Treatment for breast cancer can be exhausting and take a toll on the physical health of patients as treatment ends and they begin post-treatment life. Cancer survivors are at an increased risk of poor health, depression and physical disability. Approximately one third  ...

Living with achalasia like Seahawk Malcolm Smith

Leslie H. Price, MD

Leslie H. Price, MD
Gastroenterologist

On February 3, 2014, Yahoo Sports published an article regarding this years’ Super Bowl MVP, Malcolm Smith, as not only achieving recognition for his Super Bowl performance, but also dealing with a rare swallowing disorder known as achalasia.
 
Achalasia is a rare disorder with a prevalence of 10 cases per 100,000 individuals.  Men and women are equally affected and it is usually diagnosed between the ages of 25 to 60 years.  The disease often comes on slowly and is gradually progressive with problems swallowing solids and liquids, and movement of undigested food particles back up into the mouth unintentionally (bland regurgitation).  Patients also often complain of a burning chest sensation. Other symptoms include hiccups, difficulties belching, and sometimes weight loss.

The condition can be seen with radiology studies including a barium esophagram that shows a dilated, or larger than normal, caliber of the esophagus with a narrowing or tightness at the lower esophageal sphincter. The lower esophageal sphincter is located at the end of the esophagus before it enters the stomach.  An upper endoscopy or camera study is often performed to evaluate the esophagus and stomach closely.  It is ultimately diagnosed with high-resolution esophageal manometry, which is a technique for evaluating esophageal motor dysfunction or movement disorders of the esophagus.

Once achalasia is diagnosed, there are different treatment options ...

5 things to know about cancer screenings

Michael Milder, MD

Michael Milder, MD
Oncologist, Swedish/Ballard

Cancer causes 580,000 deaths a year in the United States. One in eight women will develop breast cancer and one in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during their lifetimes. However, many deaths can be prevented when cancer is detected at an early stage. Cancer screening and risk assessment tests are the tools we use to find cancers early.
 
How do we find early cancers?

Some cancer screenings can be done yourself at home at essentially no cost or risk. This includes regular self-examination of the breasts, testicles and skin. Home fecal occult blood testing can also be done to screen for colorectal cancer. Additional information on cancer screening and self-examinations can be found on websites such as www.cancer.org or www.webmd.com.

 
Other screening requires medical interventions. There is good evidence that well-targeted screening saves lives. However, screening tests such as mammography, colonoscopy and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) are  ...

Tips for keeping young athletes safe and healthy

Sonal Avasare, MD

Sonal Avasare, MD
Pediatric Nephrologist

We all know exercise is an important factor in maintaining an active and healthy life. However, over-exercising can lead to a rare, but serious complication known as rhabdomyolysis – a medical team that literally means ‘dissolution or destruction of skeletal muscle’. There has been a recent increase in rhabdomyolysis amongst teen athletes so it is important to recognize the warning signs and learn how to prevent them.

The classic triad of rhabdomyolysis is dark urine, muscle weakness or fatigue, and muscle pain. Although exercise can be the primary factor, other key contributing elements such as dehydration, genetic conditions (e.g. sickle cell), metabolic disorders, nutritional supplements, drug use, and heat stress can exacerbate muscle damage. Without appropriate medical evaluation and care, rhabdomyolysis can cause permanent damage to the kidneys and may even be life-threatening in severe cases. Here are some tips to help your young athlete remain active and healthy:

  1. Maintain adequate hydration – preferably with plain water.  Sports and energy drinks may often contain caffeine and excessive amounts of sugar which can cause dehydration.  On average, children that are 6-10 years old should have about 1L of fluid a day, children 10-14 years old should have 1.5L/day and teens over 14 years should have at least 2L of fluid a day. It is important to increase fluids with increased activity due to the additional fluid losses that occur.
  2. Eliminate protein supplements. A recent study by the American Academy of Pediatrics found ...

12 healthy recipes for the 12th Man

Eric Eisenberg

Eric Eisenberg
Executive Chef

When you gather with friends and family this Sunday to watch the Seattle Seahawks compete against the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XLVIII, do your guests and yourself a favor and have a couple of healthy alternatives ready.
 
We’ve prepared 12 recipes – in honor of Seattle’s 12th Man – that are easy and healthier than your typical fried, fatty foods. Enjoy and Go Hawks!

Treating and preventing common sports injuries

Scott Ruhlman, MD

Scott Ruhlman, MD
Orthopedic Surgeon

Looking to be more active in 2014? Have you been waiting all year to enjoy winter sports such as skiing or snowboarding?

There are a few common injuries that often get my patients down when they are on the go. Below are a few tips and tricks to help you prevent these common injuries and determine the best treatment options should you need it.

Sprains/Fractures
The most common injuries in the wrist and ankle are sprains and fractures. Throwing, twisting, weight-bearing, and impact can put you at risk for a wrist injury. Ankle sprains and fractures are typically caused by making a fast, shifting movement with your foot planted on the ground.

In most cases, I recommend the RICE approach: rest for around 48 hours; ice the injured area to reduce swelling (use a pack wrapped in a towel); compress with an elastic ACE wrap; and elevate the injury above heart level.

However, if you experience these symptoms, contact your provider for further evaluation.   
  • Pain at the time of injury
  • Swelling
  • Bruising or discoloration
  • Difficulty moving the wrist or ankle
  • A “popping” or tearing sensation during the trauma
  • Warmth and tenderness of the skin
More serious injuries will likely be treated with a splint, boot or cast. The healing process can take up to six weeks. Surgery may also be required.

ACL Tears
The ACL, or anterior cruciate ligament, is one of the major ligaments in your knee that helps with stabilization when turning or planting. ACL injuries take place during cutting or pivoting movements. The hallmark of a torn ACL is a distinct popping noise and your knee may give out. The  ...
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