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How to prevent food poisoning

Whitney Carter, RN, BSN

Whitney Carter, RN, BSN
Pediatric Specialty Clinical Nurse for General Surgery and Infectious Disease

Many of us are aware of the recent nationwide recall of peaches and other fruit due to the potential of bacterial contamination.  Although thankfully, no illnesses have been reported so far, I’d like to take this opportunity to refresh our knowledge about ways to avoid food borne illness or food poisoning.

 
According to The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), food poisoning affects approximately 1 in 6 Americans every year. Often it results in relatively mild symptoms such as nausea, diarrhea and vomiting that resolve within a day or so. However, food poisoning can also lead to more dangerous and even deadly outcomes, which is why food safety is so important! 
 
So how should we protect our family from food borne illness?   It’s pretty easy!  Just remember 4 basic steps:  clean, separate, cook and chill!

Talking to kids about traumatic world events

Stephanie Wilding, MS, CCLS

Stephanie Wilding, MS, CCLS
Certified Child Life Specialist

From Hurricane Sandy, shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School, Boston Marathon bombing, the Oso mudslide and most recently the shooting at Seattle Pacific University, so often now we are given immediate access and awareness to traumatic and sudden events happening around the world and right in our own communities.  As parents we play an essential role in helping our children cope with stress and the emotions that come with a traumatic event.  Sometimes we think it would be better for them not to know about these things or that talking about will make it worse, but it’s important to respect their reactions and provide a place for them to talk about it. 

Why is it important to talk with my child? 

Talking to your child is an important first step in helping them understand and process any life event and especially a large scale traumatic event.  Your child may have already heard about the event through school, social media, friends or other sources.  Taking the initiative to talk with them allows you the opportunity to clarify the facts, answer questions and provides them a chance to share their own feelings. 

What should I tell my child?

Knowing ...

Treating tennis elbow with platelet rich plasma

Sean Colio, MD

Sean Colio, MD
Board Certified, Sports Medicine

Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) is concentrated blood plasma containing a large amount of platelets. This concentrate, which is derived from your whole blood, is rich in growth factors that help heal injured tendons, ligaments, muscles, and even cartilage.  PRP is injected into the affected region to stimulate and enhance healing. Unlike cortisone injections, PRP helps heal the injured tissue and improve its function.  One of the most common areas of treatment with PRP is tennis elbow. 

Recently, a large study on PRP for tennis elbow was published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine.  They found success rates for patients with 24 weeks of follow-up were 83.9% in the PRP group compared with 68.3% in the control group. No significant complications occurred in either group. 
 
In the news, New York Yankees pitcher Masahiro Tanaka sustained a partially torn ulnar collateral ligament in his pitching elbow. He was ...

Bellyaches in Kids (and the “Und Here” Syndrome)

Uma Pisharody, MD, FAAP

Uma Pisharody, MD, FAAP
Pediatric Gastroenterologist

Bellyaches, stomachaches, or belly pain in school-age children are a common occurrence.  At least half of the children that get referred to pediatric gastroenterologists like me come for treatment of their chronic, recurrent abdominal pain.  Parents often feel frustrated because despite multiple visits to physicians, even emergency rooms, they are left with more questions than answers all whilst their child continues to suffer.

A typical scenario is a child whose pain seems worst in the mornings after awakening and towards the evening, especially after dinner or before bedtime.  Often the child doesn’t want to eat breakfast and if forced, tells his parents he feels nauseated.   When asked where the pain is, the child most often points to the area around his belly button.

More often than not, depending on a few other factors, the diagnosis ends up being ...

Mesothelioma update: shorter course of treatment and improved survival rates?

Alexander Farivar, MD

Alexander Farivar, MD
Thoracic Surgeon

There have been some very exciting recent developments we (the Thoracic Surgery team at Swedish Cancer Institute) are utilizing in the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM).

Over the past year we have offered some of our patients deemed appropriate for surgery a more streamlined approach to their overall care. Previously we have tried to offer chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation to all patients who were healthy and strong enough to undergo the three treatments, as mesothelioma is an aggressive cancer requiring aggressive treatment to optimize survival. This new approach still offers both surgery and radiation, but chemotherapy is given only to those found to have cancer in lymph nodes in the center of chest during surgery.

The advantages of this new treatment paradigm are ...

Dealing with vaginal dryness

Karen Jones, MD

Karen Jones, MD
Obstetrician/Gynecologist, Swedish Healthcare for Women

One of the more annoying situations that many of my patients have been in is having painful intercourse due to vaginal dryness. In general the cause of dryness of the vaginal tissue is lack of estrogen. This can occur postpartum, especially in women who are breastfeeding a baby, and it can occur just before and during menopause.

When estrogen is in the body, one of the effects of estrogen is to ...

Safety tips for the 4th of July

Jayne Blackburn, MSN, RN, CCRN

Jayne Blackburn, MSN, RN, CCRN
Pediatric ICU Charge Nurse

How often do we hear it on the news, local billboards, or social media to “have a safe 4th of July”? Indeed, July 4th can be one of great celebration for our nation’s independence. But do you want to spend the evening in your local Emergency Department or Urgent Care with your child instead of enjoying it with family and friends?

Fireworks are a big cause of injuries, not only to children, but to adults alike. We collectively spend thousands of dollars on things that make the loudest “BOOM”, the brightest lights in the sky, or provide the longest show. We don’t anticipate spending additional money, hundreds to thousands of dollars, on emergency care that comes from the accidents caused by fireworks.

Here are some tips to help you have a safe 4th of July celebration:
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