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Why do some people continue to have difficulty hearing even with a hearing aid?

Brenna Carroll
Why is one person a successful hearing aid user while another is not?  What factors contribute to such diverse outcomes?

Many rave about using amplification and report that acquiring hearing aids is a life changing event that opens up the world to a wide range of sounds and improves communication.  But some people report that they are reluctant to obtain amplification because they have known friends or a family member that obtained advanced hearing aids but continued to struggle hearing during group activities.  

Why is one person a successful hearing aid user while another is not?  What factors contribute to such diverse outcomes?

How to eat more vegetables

Leah Goldstein, RD, CD

Leah Goldstein, RD, CD
Clinical Nutrition Specialist

Did you know half of your plate should be from vegetables? Here are some ways to get more vegetables into your family’s meals and snacks.
 
1. Experiment with a new vegetable each week or each month!

Check out your local farmers market or produce aisle for something new and seasonal. Search the web or your favorite cook book for ideas on preparation, and don’t be afraid! Find recipes with some of your other favorite flavors or styles and you may just find your new favorite vegetable.

2. Get sneaky

  • Pureed peppers, zucchini or carrots can be “snuck” into tomato sauces for pasta or pizza. Not even the pickiest eater will notice!
  • Cauliflower, carrots or sweet potato can be steamed and pureed into mashed potatoes or a casserole.
  • Have a ...

Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

Rocco G. Ciocca, MD

Rocco G. Ciocca, MD
Chief of Vascular Surgery

Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when a weak area in the aorta (the major blood vessel that sends blood through the body) dilates and quietly expands. The dilated area can rupture or leak. Often AAA is only discovered when it appears on an X-ray taken for some other reason – or when it ruptures.
 
AAA is the third leading cause of death in men ages 60 and older. Nearly 90 percent of the time, a ruptured AAA causes death, so it is important to discover and treat it early.
 
Risk factors include:

Facts and myths about antioxidants and cancer

Jeffery C. Ward
Some of the most popular misconceptions surrounding cancer, cancer prevention and cancer treatment are about the role of antioxidants. Like many of the popular myths about cancer, there are facts, half-facts and outright falsehoods.
 
Fact: Damage to genes, particularly those involved in the regulation of cell division and cell death, is the key event in the development of cancer. 
Fact: Oxidants are substances, most often generated by our own body, that cause damage to chemicals, including the DNA that makes up our genes, by oxidizing them. The oxidation reaction most familiar to us is when metal rusts. 
Fact: Our bodies’ oxidants can contribute to cancer.
 
Half-fact: Antioxidants are chemicals we ingest that then run around neutralizing oxidants, rendering them powerless to promote cancer. The so-called antioxidant vitamins, of which vitamin C, E, and beta-carotene are the most well known are more properly called redox agents. In a particular environment, they prevent or reverse oxidation, called reduction. But they may change the acidity or even just the concentrations of the components of the reaction, and they may facilitate just the opposite. For example ....

How to prepare your child for a stay at the hospital

Audrey Fuhrer

Audrey Fuhrer
Certified Child Life Specialist

We all know that Swedish provides top-notch pediatric services for the emergent needs of children and their families.  You may be surprised to find out that many children come to Swedish for a planned inpatient stay as well.  There can be various reasons why a child and their family might be anticipating a hospital stay.  Some examples may include having a surgical procedure that requires them to be monitored for a set period of time afterward, neurological video monitoring, or medical preparations for a procedure the following day.

Regardless of what service your child will be receiving at the hospital, there are ways in which you can better prepare them and yourself for what to expect during your stay.

At Swedish, Child Life Specialists help children and families cope with the hospital process.  Child Life Specialists are available to help educate and prepare children and families prior to surgery and/or an inpatient stay.  Some tips on how to prepare your child for an inpatient stay include .....

Managing pain during labor

Erin M. Hurley Waters
One of the most common concerns women have during their pregnancy is how to manage pain during labor and delivery.  Labor pain may be more or less intense than you expected, or may hurt in a different way. It is hard to predict how any labor will go or how anyone will respond to pain.

Labor pain is due to contractions of the muscles of the uterus and by pressure on the cervix. This can feel like strong cramping in the abdomen, groin, and back. Some women experience pain in their sides or thighs as well. Women can also feel pressure on the bladder and bowels by the baby's head and the stretching of the birth canal and vagina. Some find the hardest part is not the contraction itself, but the fact that the contractions keep coming.  

One of the best ways to alleviate fears for women is to learn about the available strategies for coping with pain. There are both medical and non-medical tools that may be a good match for you.

While you are deciding, think about what appeals to you most. Ask your health care provider these questions:

Talking to kids about cancer

Tricia Matteson, MSW, LSWAIC

Tricia Matteson, MSW, LSWAIC
Oncology Social Worker

What do I tell my kids?” 

This is often the first question I’m asked by a parent with a new cancer diagnosis.  One of the most important things for parents to remember is that they know their children better than anyone else and they love them more than anyone…they can trust themselves to do this well.
 
Beyond that general reassurance, however, there are some practical tips for talking with children about a cancer diagnosis. 
 
Prepare for the conversation 
 
Think about your goals for the conversation.  What does your child need to know?  How you can help your child understand what’s going on?  How do you want your child to feel after the talk?  Who should tell your child you have cancer and can the person talking to your child stay relatively calm?
 
When and where should I have this conversation?  You don’t have to wait until you have all the answers.  Be prepared to ...
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