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Nutrition spotlight on quinoa

Sarah Lawson, RD

Sarah Lawson, RD
Registered Dietitian

This week the Registered Dietitians and Diet Technicians offered up a unique spin on quinoa for National Nutrition Month. Many of you reported you have had it as a side dish at dinner or in a salad for lunch. However on Wednesday, we served quinoa for breakfast! Spiced up with cinnamon, cloves, ginger, and cardamom, the sky is the limit for extra add-ins to further boost the nutrition of your morning meal.

Additional Flavor Ideas to Mix and Match:
  • Chopped nuts (walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, almonds, etc)
  • Diced apple or pear
  • Banana slices
  • Mixed berries
  • Dried fruit (raisins, dried cranberries, prunes)
  • Almond or peanut butter
  • A tablespoon of flax seed or chia for healthy essential fatty acids
  • Honey, maple syrup, or agave nectar for sweetness
  • Scrambled egg for protein
Technically considered a seed (not a grain), quinoa is gluten-free and a complete source of protein. A serving provides a good source of dietary fiber, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, and zinc. Quinoa is also packed with B-Vitamins including folate, thiamin, riboflavin, and B6. Try substituting quinoa for pasta or rice at meals to change things up and increase the nutrition ..

To Mammogram or Not to Mammogram? A note on recent studies

Mary Kelly, MD

A Canadian medical research study has recently been published questioning the value of doing screening mammograms on women in their forties. The article has spurred controversy because the results contradict multiple other similar research studies which showed that women in that age group who get regular mammograms actually are spared death from breast cancer more often that women who are not invited to screening.

Some problems with the methods of Canadian study, published in the journal BMJ, were pointed out by a scientist at the University of Washington, Judith Malmgren, who has worked with Swedish Medical Center doctors to see how women in their forties have fared in our system. Click here to read Dr. Malmgren’s letter to the editor of BMJ.

There are two ironic features to the Canadian study. First, the authors say it is okay for women to not get screening starting in their forties “when adjuvant therapy for breast cancer is readily available.” This means that it is okay to diagnose breast cancer later because you can mop up bigger and more advanced cancers with treatment like chemotherapy, radiation and bigger surgery. But at Swedish, we do not think that many women prefer more severe therapy rather than earlier detection.

Secondly ...

Weak link between epsilon toxin and MS

James D. Bowen, MD

A recent article has been published suggesting that MS may be caused by a bacterial toxin. The bacteria is Clostridium Perfringens, a common bacteria found in soil and a cause of food poisoning. This bacteria can produce a number of toxins, one of which is the epsilon toxin.

This study found that about 10% of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) had antibodies to the epsilon toxin, compared to 1% of people without MS. In pathology specimens from mice, the epsilon toxin was found to bind to blood vessels in the retina of the eye, and to myelin in the brain. The authors also reported a single case of a woman with MS who was infected with Clostridium Perfringens and that was producing the epsilon toxin.

Though this study has been widely discussed online, I think that it is unlikely that this will be the answer to the MS problem. This study was primarily in pathology tissue, which found that the toxin was able to bind to myelin. Many more studies will be needed to determine whether this toxin is capable of causing damage to myelin of the type that is seen in MS. There are many other known toxins to myelin, but so far none seem to be the cause of MS.

They tried to show that ..

Adding kale to your repertoire

Sarah Lawson, RD

Sarah Lawson, RD
Registered Dietitian

Thank you to everyone who stopped by for the first week of National Nutrition Month yesterday! It was a big success and you made it possible! The overall feedback we received was very positive for the Kale salad we shared, even those who thought they didn’t enjoy kale! This proves a great example of exploring new, nutritious foods to add to your current diet that you might not have tried (or liked) before.

For those who found the below recipe too salty, you can reduce the sea salt to 1/2 teaspoon and add just ¼ cup of gorgonzola cheese. The sea salt is pertinent to “massage” the kale which helps tenderize the leaves. You may also substitute gorgonzola cheese for a reduced-sodium goat cheese or feta instead. Enjoy!

Massaged Kale Salad


Lymph nodes in children

Robert L. Weinsheimer, MD

Robert L. Weinsheimer, MD
Pediatric General Surgeon

One of the most common referrals to my pediatric surgery practice is (in the parents’ words) “to check out this lump and make sure it’s nothing to worry about.”  Lymph nodes are part of the less publicized part of the circulatory system: the lymphatics.  Lymphatics play a key role in our body’s immune system, and lymph nodes grow in response to an infection in the “neighborhood” to produce cells necessary to hopefully resolve the infection. 

About half of all children will develop enlarged lymph nodes (cervical lymphadenitis) in the neck for example, and the vast majority of these are in response to a minor infection in the area (sore throat, sinus infection, ear infection, etc.).  Often the infection is quite subtle and might not be identified.  These nodes typically go through a pattern of growing and then receding in size once the infection resolves.  This process can take several weeks to months.  The nodes may become tender, warm, and there may be some redness of the overlying skin.  Your child might complain of pain in the area, be fussier, have fever, and/or have decreased appetite.  If the node itself becomes infected, it can turn into an abscess and would require antibiotics and a drainage procedure.  Any possibly infected lymph node should be evaluated by your doctor.
 
Some enlarged lymph nodes ...

Enjoy the taste of eating right - National Nutrition Month 2014

Sarah Lawson, RD

Sarah Lawson, RD
Registered Dietitian

In honor of National Nutrition Month®, the Registered Dietitians and Diet Technicians of Swedish Medical Center will be promoting healthy eating and proper nutrition each Wednesday in March during lunch hours (11am-2pm) at the First Hill, Cherry Hill, Ballard, and Issaquah Campuses.

This year’s theme is “Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right”. Research by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics found that taste is the main reason Americans will select one food over another. This creates a complicated dilemma, as the foods you love will likely become the ones you eat the most. The challenge is to create easy to prepare, delicious, and nutritious meals and snacks that are low in fat, sodium, and added sugar.

The nutrition experts will be providing healthy tips, recommendations, and information to encourage and improve the nutritional health of the Swedish community. There will be ...

Is it ok to laugh with cancer?

Jeffery C. Ward, MD

Jeffery C. Ward, MD
Medical Oncologist, Swedish Cancer Institute

“Is it okay to laugh?”

The question caught me off guard for a moment, then its meaning sunk in.  She was really saying, “Cancer is serious stuff, my breast has been cut on and radiated, and you’ve given me cancer fighting poisons in my veins. My hair has fallen out, food tastes funny, and I’m on a first name basis with the muzak at my insurance company. I’ve done my crying, but is it appropriate to laugh at it all?”

I remembered back to an intimidating nurse critiquing a tape of my very first patient interview during my second month of medical school. Her eyes were sharp and piercing and her brow furrowed as she watched the tape. Half way through she stopped it, turned it off, and said, “You are flippant…. I don’t much care for it.” My heart sank, and then she continued without a smile, but with a twinkle in her eyes, “but it works for you, so don’t mind me and keep on doing it.”

I believe that humor is therapeutic. Of  course, that is not a new idea. The saying, “laughter is the best medicine” did not originate with Readers Digest. The biblical record states, “A merry heart does good like medicine, but a broken spirit drieth bones” (Proverbs 17:22). I don’t know that a merry heart will add time to a cancer patient’s life, but I know that it will add life to the time that they have.  

We don’t know a lot about the physiological effects of humor. It does ....
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